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16

This is generally explained as two different details of the same event being the emphisis of the record. Both accounts tell of a suicide. One specifically mentions hanging, the other doesn't mention anything about cause of death but does mention his "falling". These can readily be reconciled through natural causes either by something going wrong in the ...


15

It's quite possible that both happened: he hanged himself, and when he was found and cut down, (which might have been some time later, long enough for the decay process to begin,) his body burst open with a predictable display of gore.


13

The meaning is pretty obvious in context. Ps 137 is a lament for Jerusalem after the Babylonians have invaded and destroyed it. Verses 7-9 make it explicit: 7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. “Tear it down,” they cried, “tear it down to its foundations!” 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, ...


8

Jesus' body was in the tomb (Matthew 27:59ff; cp Mark 15, Luke 23, John 19). Jesus' spirit was in Paradise (Luke 23:42ff) - else He could not have truthfully promised the thief crucified with Him that "today you will be with Me in Paradise". See also Luke 16:19-31. Jesus paid our debt in completion while on the cross - while He absorbed the full wrath of ...


7

To understand this perspective, it is better to think of "death" as "a separation", rather than "a ceasing to exist". So, when you "die", your spirit is separated from your flesh, and from this world. 1) The second death is the ultimate separation of (the spirits of) sinners from the presence of God. 2) Indeed, (the spirits of) those who are "resurrected" ...


7

Very little is said in the Bible of where Jesus was and what he was doing during the three days, but here's what we do know: He promised the thief on the cross that they would be together in paradise after death. (Luke 23:39-42) When Mary recognized him in the garden after his resurrection, he told her that he had not yet been to heaven. (John 20:15-17 ) ...


7

Sacred Tradition would say yes, the recently reworded Nicene creed says, He suffered death and was buried We also say it was in: accordance with the Scriptures which means, there's some prophecy that says this had to happen which you can read in Psalm 22 or Isaiah 53 or Genesis 22 Death is the splitting of the body, but not splitting "The ...


6

Orthodoxy has a Tradition of the Dormition of Mary wherein it is belived that she didn't die but merely fell asleep and was assumed into Heaven. Catholic teaching neither affirms nor contradicts the Dormition but we have another tradition which is written in one of the apocryphal gospels ascribed to St. Thomas but written hundreds of years a after his death. ...


6

That death and "sleeping," are often conflated in Scripture is perhaps a useful metaphor here. Notice how, in 1 Corinthians 15, Paul likens those who have died to those who have "fallen asleep in Christ." And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. 19 ...


5

Your real question is really why do the sins in these three instances deserve Death in God's eyes? Leviticus 20:13, Exodus 35:2, Deuteronomy 21:18-21. The answer to that is the same as why God demanded death for when Adam and Eve disobeyed God, and ate from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Genesis 2:17 KJV But of the tree of the ...


5

I'm sure that there are people who think otherwise, but you didn't specify a perspective,so I'm going to go by answering it from what is the most common understanding in my personal experience. By that I mean not my own personal opinion, but rather the understanding that every sermon I've heard, or every exposition I've read seems to think. With that ...


5

In a family, the firstborn son had special privileges that set Him above all others. Jesus, in ushering in the resurrection for all, had the privileges of that firstborn son. Note: For a long time, I used to think of this strictly in chronological terms - but it isn't warranted. Elijah & Elisha resurrected dead people. Lazarus and Jairus' daughter ...


5

The Bible often uses the word sleep to refer to those who are dead, especially those who are going to be resurrected to life. So I think Jesus meant that the girl was not dead forever, without hope. Yet you sweep people away in the sleep of death— they are like the new grass of the morning (Psalm 90:5) Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth ...


5

The Bible teaches that death entered into the world because of Adam's sin: Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through sin, and in this way death came to all people, because all sinned— To be sure, sin was in the world before the law was given, but sin is not charged against anyone’s account where there is no law. ...


4

The Athanasian Creed, which is accepted by most christian, (esp. catholic, orthodox, anglican, Lutheran, etc.) reads thus: ...He ascended into heaven, he sitteth on the right hand of the God the Father Almighty, from whence he will come to judge the quick and the dead. At whose coming all men will rise again with their bodies; And shall give account for ...


4

In Christianity, as in Judaism, death isn't "the end". It does not mean to cease to exist. Perhaps the verse that makes this most clear is 2 Corinthians 5:8 (KJV) We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord In death, it is only the physical body that dies. The spirit/soul continues to ...


4

1 Peter 3:18 For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit: 19 By which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison; This place that Jesus, while he was dead, went to preach to the spirits in prison, may be Hades or Paradise. ...


4

The severity of the punishment matches the severity of the crime, that's all. For Israel to keep a holy God in her midst who will provide her with plenty of rain and abundant crops, health and well-being, protection in all warfare, bravery and courage in its citizens, much healthy offspring, and so on (Deuteronomy 28), will demand high standards on the ...


4

I think I understand your question, but not fully. Here is my answer based on my understanding. You asked: "Because of Christ's death, what does death mean for me?" Christ felt everything we have gone through (joy, pain, sorrow, etc), and suffered for it in the Garden. Alma 7:11-12 Book of Mormon 11 And he shall go forth, suffering pains and ...


4

The answer is because Jesus was without sin. When Adam and Eve first sinned, not only were they thrown out of the Garden of Eden, but they were also rendered mortal; they were now capable of dying. Everyone who sins dies, and everyone sins. Even those before Jesus who died and were returned to life (like Lazarus) still had to die again later. Jesus however ...


4

Division of human beings into distinct entities called body and soul is not original biblical (nor generally Semitic) thought but is usually attributed to Greek (and other pagan) philosophies. This is not to say that this division is necessarily false, but there are two points worth mentioning: The Old Testament generally relies on the Hebrew belief that ...


4

Probably not Jonah spoke of coming out of the belly of Sheol (Hebrew word for grave). Jonah could have been speaking literally or using a figure of speech. Jonah 2:1-2 ESV Then Jonah prayed to the Lord his God from the belly of the fish, 2 saying, “I called out to the Lord, out of my distress, and he answered me; out of the belly of Sheol I cried, and ...


4

Conservative Protestants typically use the phrase "intermediate state" when talking theologically about the "immediately-in-heaven" view. Wayne Grudem is a conservative Protestant representative of this view. In his book, Bible Doctrine, on page 352, Grudem writes, "The souls of believers go immediately into God's presence. Death is a temporary ...


4

I'll begin with Mark's Gospel, as that was the first New Testament Gospel to be written and is considered by scholars to be the primary source used by the authors of the other gospels, either directly (Matthew, Luke) or indirectly (John). Mark 15:40 says that Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joses, and Salome stood watching from afar off: ...


4

Matthew 27:38-54; Mark 15:27-39; Luke 23:35-49; John 19:23-34 describe the Crucifixion and the people present and name some of them.These passages from the four Canonical Gospels, however, give different accounts of the number of people present and their names. If I am allowed to put these accounts together the following names can be found (or inferred): ...


3

God is eternal and inherently immortal. If we dismiss the incarnation in entirety, then we can also dismiss the idea of God being able to die. Therefore, it is because of the incarnation that God could (and did) die. In this incarnation, the divine person of God the Son, the Word of God (Rev. 19:13), received humanity (human nature) upon himself (John ...


3

Catholic teaching states that you must make a sincere effort to confess all mortal sins in the sacrament of confession. It is often encouraged that all grave sins be confessed as soon as possible, and certainly all mortal sins. However, if the sinner is unable to confess before death, the effortful intent to confess is taught to be valid, provided it is a ...


3

(Here's the "tl/dr" summary: Article four of the Apostles' Creed says Jesus "descended into hell" between the time that he was buried and the time that he rose from the dead.) That's a good question. I'm aware of no specific place in scripture that provides an extensive & thorough, "He was at [location] to accomplish [goal]"-type answer, although ...


3

When God created man He was sinless, and would have remained so had he not disobeyed the one restriction God gave him. God also told him what he would face as a penalty should he disobey that command. Genesis 2:9, 16 & 17 KJV 9 And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of ...


3

John Calvin says (Commentarium in epistolam ad Hebraeos, translated by John Owen in 1853): Were any one to object and say, that some had died twice, such as Lazarus, and not once; the answer would be this, - that the Apostle speaks here of the ordinary lot of men; but they are to be excepted from this condition, who shall by an instantaneous change put ...



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