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13

I have never been heavily involved in fantasy or role playing games, but I've had plenty of friends who were. A couple of them have given it up for one reason or another. The most applicable of these cases was somebody who was convicted about the usage of their time spent in the gaming world not being productive or glorifying to God. There was no objection ...


11

On one hand, fantasy world is based on magic. In fantasy there are daemons, witches, sorcerers, spells etc. But on the other hand, real magic is a sin against God's Will Deuteronomy 18:9 (ESV): 9 "When you come into the land that the LORD your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominable practices of those nations. 10 There ...


11

It's not an ignorant question. You've touched on something that has great value to Latter-day Saints. Not only has the LDS Church partnered with Ancestry.com and others to make their genealogical records available to church members and developed FamilySearch to organize and collaborate family history research, the LDS Church also has the world's largest ...


10

The missionary dress code has changed a lot over the years to stay compatible with current trends and styles (without compromising modesty, of course). Until about 2010, sister missionaries were required to wear nylons and dark dresses/skirts that went down to at least mid-calf, as well as dark suit/jacket tops. In 2010, the dress code was updated, ...


8

The biggest issue I can see in America is the frequent confusion of Christian marriage and Governmental marriage (which hints at a greater confusion between America and God, but that's another topic for another day.) From a Christian perspective, marriage is defined as a covenant between a man and a woman to honor and love each other, and treat the other as ...


8

This answer will focus on the religious aspects of the Amish rather than the cultural aspects, as far as differentiation is possible. Even then, there are four major orders and each community is self-governing; therefore, all statements made will be generalizations, and will naturally have exceptions. The Amish find their roots in the Swiss Anabaptists ...


8

The original concept album (on which the stage and film versions are based) was deliberately ambiguous about whether Jesus was, in fact, anything other than a man. Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice came to the Gospel text with a humanistic premise. "We approached the opera from the point of view of Christ the man, rather than Christ the God," Rice noted. ...


8

Proverbs 31:10-31 is a famous passage on The Virtuous Woman. In addition to taking care of her family, the passage describes a woman who contributes financially to her household. Proverbs 31:16-18 She considers a field and buys it;     out of her earnings she plants a vineyard. She sets about her work vigorously;     her arms are strong for her ...


7

For Mennonites and Amish, the issue is not about the technology itself, but about community. Community is of paramount importance, and a technology is accepted or not depending on its effect on the community. So, for example, cars are bad because they permit people to travel long distances on a regular basis, reducing the connection to the local community. ...


7

Before I can answer, I must clarify several terms that you are using incorrectly/ambiguously and define how I will approach this question. I also must begin with the disclaimer that I will be answering from an Eastern Orthodox perspective. Eastern Orthodox vs. Oriental 'Orthodox' vs. Nestorianism Nestorianism was condemned at the third and fourth ...


7

No. Everyone in my local Church self-describes as fundamentalist, and we live like normal folk in cities, suburbs, farms, our own houses, apartments, underground survival bunkers with automated home defenses, abandoned missle silos, trees, caves, and just about anywhere else normal people live. Just joking about the last four on that list... Our group ...


6

First of all, Paul was the Roman citizen, and during his imprisonment he was been waiting for Caesar's judgment: (Acts 25:10-12) Then said Paul, I stand at Caesar's judgment seat, where I ought to be judged (...) I appeal unto Caesar. Then Festus, when he had conferred with the council, answered, Hast thou appealed unto Caesar? unto Caesar shalt thou go. ...


6

As a gamer and Christian who's been both since the 1980s I can explain the general history of Christian attitudes toward fantasy role-playing games. This is largely crossposted from a newer and somewhat identical question on the RPG Stack Exchange, Background of Christian resistance to role-playing. Ancient History The Church was initially quite ...


6

Ironically, I think the constitutional issue here is the simpler one. Remember that from the Christian world view, marriage is established by God between Adam and Eve. It is a religious structure before it is a social or legal structure. Therefore, by the reasoning of the poster in the question, any law or regulation that recognizes marriage — at ...


6

Preface: This is one of those questions that deals with personal convictions and preferences rather than a clear-cut Biblical statement. This actually came up not too long ago when our Pastor was preaching a sermon on the difference between the three. A Biblical statement is simple. The Bible says "Thou shalt" or "thou shalt not". (Example: Theft - thou ...


6

There is no Biblical argument for any food or drink of any type to 'aid in spiritual connection with God' or in 'developing a deeper understanding of his Word'. However, as you already noticed, the Bible does oppose drinking too much alcohol. 9Do you not know that the wicked will not inherit the kingdom of God? ... nor drunkards nor slanderers nor ...


5

There are really two kinds of cuss words (with some overlap): the profane and the vulgar. Profanity is absolutely prohibited, in part because of the verse quoted in your question, but it is important here to first understand the precise definition of the word. To profane something is to take something that is holy (set apart) and make it common. Words ...


5

I know when I was growing up my mom didn't let me play D&D (I did anyway) partly because of the magic/demons/occult stuff, but also because (according to Focus on the Family at least) role playing is supposedly all consuming with a cult like aspect of sucking you into it's world and not letting you go. That was at least the common wisdom of James Dobson ...


4

Mormons would be one to say yes. According to LDS belief, any who die without a complete or necessary knowledge of Jesus will be taught about Him in the Spirit World after this life, where they may choose to accept or reject the gospel. (This is why they build temples: to redeem the living and the dead.) On a related note, they also believe that Christ came ...


3

Historically, these verses have not been applied to employer/employee relations, at least not in the sense that we understand employment today. In ancient times slavery was fairly common; employment, however, was not. Most free people lived and worked on the family farm. Employment contracts did exist, but only to protect the employer's interests. Contracts ...


3

SHORT ANSWER One major example is the USA Southern States (The South) in the four or five decades leading up to the Civil War of the USA (1860's). Slavery was very common in The South and using the Bible and other religious arguments was very common to justify the morality of it. Although the verses you site were not as commonly used, except perhaps 1 ...


3

The shift of the powerbase from the east to Europe caused a fundamental change in the worldview of the Western Church, not the least being from the influences of Greek Philosophy. Concepts such as Original Sin which find no place in Judaism and Eastern Orthodoxy began to find a foothold in Western Christian Theology, with further knockon results: Quote from ...


3

Dominion Theology is the belief that society should be governed exclusively by Christian Laws, whether or not all of the people in that society are Christians. It is very much a minority view within Christianity, which has traditionally believed in dual secular and ecclesiatical authorities, even in times and places where Christianity has been the dominant ...


3

In western culture, Red is the color of passion and it's disordered vice of lust is cooped up in the color. (see also, the Scarlet letter). I see the esteemed Revered V says the sin is pride. I don't disagree, I just think the real sin that is being covered here is lust and not pride. Karen has a disordered desire to dance and be seen when she should stand ...


3

Let me preface this by saying that I'm making the implicit assumption that the reader has some typical form of Christian belief (so I don't have to keep saying it). The Bible, as a piece of literature, was written for people in a specific time and culture. In that sense, it behooves those who try to understand the Bible to also understand the culture as ...


3

The Laestadian Lutheran Church (LLC), the American branch of the Laestadians, defines sin by quoting Ro. 14:23 saying sin is "whatsoever is not of faith". One reason they think it's sinful is that there's a whole lot on TV and in popular music that meets that criterion. And since it is part of their mission to promote "Christian values and ethics", seeing ...


2

In Romans, Paul mentions that the Gentiles can do good, because the morals are written on their heart. Romans 2:14-15 NIV 14 (Indeed, when Gentiles, who do not have the law, do by nature things required by the law, they are a law for themselves, even though they do not have the law. 15 They show that the requirements of the law are written on ...


2

This question is particularly difficult to answer because it is not clear who should evaluate what is moral. If Biblical morality is the standard, then I strongly suspect that it would "encourage" openness to the Gospel for the trivial reason that there isn't much reason to adopt those features of Biblical morality that are not found in other moral systems ...


2

The Jews of Jesus's time were not particularly moral; they were particularly moralistic. They went to great lengths to put on outward appearances of piety, which repeatedly earned them the condemnatory epithet of "hypocrites!" from the Savior. We get a pretty good sense of what they were like from the Gospels. For example, using legalistic tricks to get ...


2

While there is little debate that the ancient Hebrews had access to cannabis, whether it was used is something which is very much subject to debate. The LXX suggests that it was cannabis, while the most reliable Hebrew documents say calamus (which is an entirely separate species), other sources identify that Hebrew word with yet another plant from the ...



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