Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

43

C. S. Lewis wrote in Christian Reunion: The real reason, I take it, why you cannot be in communion with us is not your disagreement with this or that particular Protestant doctrine, so much as the absence of any real "Doctrine", in your sense of the word, at all. It is, you feel, like asking a man to say he agrees not with a speaker but with a debating ...


16

The word myth, in its academic definition, means a story with deep power and symbolic meaning. When studied in the academic sense, it's that meaning that is important, not whether the story actually happened or not. Thus ancient 'myths' like the founding of Rome, or the stories of Hercules were important (to their societies) for what they said and the effect ...


15

No. C.S. Lewis converted to Christianity in 1931. While there is no doubt that Muscular Christianity, as a movement, was still around at that time, the largest proponents for muscular Christianity, Charles Kingsley and Thomas Hughes, died before 1900. This, of course, does not preclude C.S. Lewis from adhering to these views. However, his corpus does not ...


14

Before Elijah was taken away into heaven, he “crossed the Jordan,” and ever since, “crossing the Jordan” has been a metaphor for dying, or crossing over into heaven. By the time of Pilgrim’s Progress (1670s or so) this was an established metaphor for gaining entry into paradise. Now, having seen the Jordan River firsthand, I can tell you that it isn’t much ...


9

Aslan's Country is not Heaven - it is Paradise, it is important to read carefully The Last Battle if you want to make a comment on this part in particular. Aslan's country is not unconnected with heaven, as Eden of old and Paradise in concept are a type of Heaven. But if you pay attention to The Last Battle, Aslan's Country is itself only a figure -- Heaven ...


8

This is what Lewis has to say for himself in his introduction: I hope no reader will suppose that "mere" Christianity is here put forward as an alternative to the creeds of the existing communions—as if a man could adopt it in preference to Congregationalism or Greek Orthodoxy or anything else. It is more like a hall out of which doors open into ...


8

The Reformed perspective Tim Challies (a well known reformed pastor in Toronto) gives an in depth opinion on Mere Christianity on his blog. Reading Classics - Mere Christianity by Tim Challies part I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII From the reformed view, Lewis does make the common errors with regard to free will and God's sovereignty, especially with regard ...


8

OK. Couple of things. As you said, Númenor is closer to Atlantis. But Númenor is not supposed to be heaven, the Grey Havens are, their name in Elvish: Valinor. They are also reachable by boat, BUT ONLY BY THE ELVES (and special others such as the wizards and the ring-bearers). Man dies and has a fate which is not known to any save the highest of the Valar ...


6

Here is a more full context: May we not, by a reasonable analogy, suppose likewise that there is no experience of the spirit so transcendent and supernatural, no vision of Deity Himself so close and so far beyond all images and emotions, that to it also there cannot be an appropriate correspondence on the sensory level? Not by a new sense but by ...


5

tl;dr> NO! For Lewis, Pleasure is temporary, Joy reminds us of what is to come First and foremost, I should admit that if the canon ever gets re-opened, The Great Divorce is my vote for book #67. :) That said, C.S. Lewis has a very definite idea in mind when he says "Infinite Joy". In The Weight of Glory he writes: “It would seem that Our Lord finds ...


5

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


4

The quote is from C.S.Lewis in "Mere christianity", book 4, chapter 3 "Time And Beyond Time".


4

I think your friend either misunderstands you or Lewis. You will find a nice essay by David Allred, comparing C.S. Lewis and Plato, at "Into the Wardrobe". Things in themselves It is perfectly Christian to reflect that all things in themselves are good. Indeed, Paul asserted the idea just as clearly: "I am convinced, being fully persuaded in the Lord ...


4

The same could be said of G.K. Chesterton and probably a whole host of smart writers wholly ignorant of large swaths of Christianity. One difference, pointed out here is that Lewis doesn't see a need for a Church and without a Church it is hard to have a priesthood and without a priesthood it is hard to have a sacrifice - so I'd imagine that's contrary to ...


3

But I'm wondering if there is anything in earlier Christian writings or thought (especially the Bible of course) that might have influenced this creative choice? When describing the paradise after judgment day in Revelation 21, the Revelator begins (ESV quoted): Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had ...


3

I've read several of Lewis's works (Narnia series, Great Divorce, Mere Christianity, pieces of a few others), and I'm not aware of any of his writings that suggest what that author describes. Certainly, Lewis had some very interesting views about what life will be like after we die (or after the return of Christ). In The Last Battle, "heaven" is depicted ...


3

Lewis is pointing out that if the object of hope can never be attained as a better state (i.e., it is better to seek with anticipation than to find), then true hope is impossible (with the exclusion of false perception, i.e., "and known to be true"). One cannot hope for a worse state. One could say that in the glorified state hope is no longer significant. ...


2

In his book "Mere Christianity" he indicates that Christianity is one step in a sort of religious evolutionary system. In his mind the thing after Christianity won't be constrained by religious divisions or Dogmas. This is one obvious reason he wasn't interested in becoming Catholic. The evolution is approximately: Paganism->Christianity->Something ...


2

Whenever I have asked God about this question, a very simple analogy comes to mind of geometry. To begin, I was in a fellowship meeting once, and the question was asked of how God can be three in one. A word of wisdom was then shared where the woman who responded said, "He is not 1 + 1 + 1, but 1 x 1 x 1". God has three dimensions (Father, Son, and Holy ...


2

I don't really think this question is on-topic for this site, since it's not about Christianity. It's probably not really on topic on any SE site, since it's just a discussion topic, and the only authoritative source for an answer died 49 years 11 months ago today. Having said that, I think the best answer I can provide to your question: When he said ...


2

As I understand it, he is saying that our future perception may be "expanded", while still being qualitatively the same - in particular, not approaching the very different perception of time that God has. (We experience time as a succession of cause and effect; we can remember the past but can only conjecture about the future. On the other hand, God sees all ...


2

My limited understanding is that the early church fathers were as aware of platonic philosophy as Plato was of Jewish philosophy. "The Fathers of the early Church sought to explain the striking resemblance between the doctrines of Plato and those of Christianity, principally by the acquaintance, which, as they supposed, that philosopher had with learned ...


1

I believe he is saying that God is a person who is full of happiness and goodness. Namely Love love for all mankind. He uses every experienced pleasure as an opportunity to give gratitude and contemplate the majesty of God. The God of all creation. As can be seen here: Adoration says, ‘What must be the quality of that Being whose far-off and ...


1

Yes, the Bible says: That is what the Scriptures mean when they say, “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, and no mind has imagined what God has prepared for those who love him.” 1 Corinthians 2:9, quoting Isaiah 64:4. So we don't know if it will be infinite (whatever that would mean in this context) but we do know that it is way ...


1

There are at least two solid Biblical scriptures which prove that time continues in heaven. First in Revelation 19 Jesus returns in the second coming riding a white horse, we know that at that time the saved are taken to heaven for it is written "For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of an archangel, and with the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible