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52

C. S. Lewis wrote in Christian Reunion: The real reason, I take it, why you cannot be in communion with us is not your disagreement with this or that particular Protestant doctrine, so much as the absence of any real "Doctrine", in your sense of the word, at all. It is, you feel, like asking a man to say he agrees not with a speaker but with a debating ...


19

The word myth, in its academic definition, means a story with deep power and symbolic meaning. When studied in the academic sense, it's that meaning that is important, not whether the story actually happened or not. Thus ancient 'myths' like the founding of Rome, or the stories of Hercules were important (to their societies) for what they said and the effect ...


15

No. C.S. Lewis converted to Christianity in 1931. While there is no doubt that Muscular Christianity, as a movement, was still around at that time, the largest proponents for muscular Christianity, Charles Kingsley and Thomas Hughes, died before 1900. This, of course, does not preclude C.S. Lewis from adhering to these views. However, his corpus does not ...


14

Before Elijah was taken away into heaven, he “crossed the Jordan,” and ever since, “crossing the Jordan” has been a metaphor for dying, or crossing over into heaven. By the time of Pilgrim’s Progress (1670s or so) this was an established metaphor for gaining entry into paradise. Now, having seen the Jordan River firsthand, I can tell you that it isn’t much ...


13

It's from The Screwtape Letters, letter XVIII. The truth is that wherever a man lies with a woman, there, whether they like it or not, a transcendental relation is set up between them which must be eternally enjoyed or eternally endured. In context, Screwtape is telling Wormwood that the "one flesh" analogy in the Bible refers not to some romantic ...


11

C. S. Lewis is well-known for not calling himself a theologian. Rather than seeking a systematic theological perspective, he understood the story of Christ as a "true myth." As he explains: It is true, not in the sense of being a 'description' of God (that no finite mind could take in) but in the sense of being the way in which God chooses to (or can) ...


9

This is what Lewis has to say for himself in his introduction: I hope no reader will suppose that "mere" Christianity is here put forward as an alternative to the creeds of the existing communions—as if a man could adopt it in preference to Congregationalism or Greek Orthodoxy or anything else. It is more like a hall out of which doors open into ...


8

The Reformed perspective Tim Challies (a well known reformed pastor in Toronto) gives an in depth opinion on Mere Christianity on his blog. Reading Classics - Mere Christianity by Tim Challies part I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII From the reformed view, Lewis does make the common errors with regard to free will and God's sovereignty, especially with regard ...


8

OK. Couple of things. As you said, Númenor is closer to Atlantis. But Númenor is not supposed to be heaven, the Grey Havens are, their name in Elvish: Valinor. They are also reachable by boat, BUT ONLY BY THE ELVES (and special others such as the wizards and the ring-bearers). Man dies and has a fate which is not known to any save the highest of the Valar ...


8

If you check out "The Abolition of Man" you'll get an understanding of what he means. He's basically saying that modern education has a tendency to move our eyes from the joy that is set before us in heaven, to the created things of this world. In Lewis' time (think mid-1940's) the "modern education" system which he decries was more or less about a century ...


7

tl;dr> NO! For Lewis, Pleasure is temporary, Joy reminds us of what is to come First and foremost, I should admit that if the canon ever gets re-opened, The Great Divorce is my vote for book #67. :) That said, C.S. Lewis has a very definite idea in mind when he says "Infinite Joy". In The Weight of Glory he writes: “It would seem that Our Lord finds ...


7

There's a very common teaching on what's called "soul ties". The idea is that there are various things that can tie two human souls together. One of those is sex. The Biblical support for this is 1 Corinthians 6:16 6 Do you not know that he who unites himself with a prostitute is one with her in body? For it is said, “The two will become one flesh.” ...


6

Here is a more full context: May we not, by a reasonable analogy, suppose likewise that there is no experience of the spirit so transcendent and supernatural, no vision of Deity Himself so close and so far beyond all images and emotions, that to it also there cannot be an appropriate correspondence on the sensory level? Not by a new sense but by ...


6

The most obvious reference I see comes from St. Catherine of Siena, one of the Doctors of the Catholic Church. St. Catherine wrote a work known as the Dialogue, representing a discussion between a soul and God. In Section 22 of the Dialogue, God says this to the soul: "[The] vision of the Devil is the third pain [of four pains suffered by those in Hell] ...


5

The quote is from C.S.Lewis in "Mere christianity", book 4, chapter 3 "Time And Beyond Time".


5

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


4

The same could be said of G.K. Chesterton and probably a whole host of smart writers wholly ignorant of large swaths of Christianity. One difference, pointed out here is that Lewis doesn't see a need for a Church and without a Church it is hard to have a priesthood and without a priesthood it is hard to have a sacrifice - so I'd imagine that's contrary to ...


4

Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning ...


4

I think your friend either misunderstands you or Lewis. You will find a nice essay by David Allred, comparing C.S. Lewis and Plato, at "Into the Wardrobe". Things in themselves It is perfectly Christian to reflect that all things in themselves are good. Indeed, Paul asserted the idea just as clearly: "I am convinced, being fully persuaded in the Lord ...


4

But I'm wondering if there is anything in earlier Christian writings or thought (especially the Bible of course) that might have influenced this creative choice? When describing the paradise after judgment day in Revelation 21, the Revelator begins (ESV quoted): Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had ...


4

A quick Google search produced this: Now the story of Christ is simply a true myth: a myth working on us the same way as the others, but with this tremendous difference that it really happened: and one must be content to accept it in the same way, remembering that it is God’s myth where the others are men’s myths: i.e., the Pagan stories are God ...


4

I also found it in Mere Christianity under "7. Let's Pretend": Why? What is the good of pretending to be what you are not? Well, even on the human level, you know, there are two kinds of pretending. There is a bad kind, where the pretence is there instead of the real thing; as when a man pretends he is going to help you instead of really helping ...


4

From my notes on chapter 2 of Miracles: Miracle: “An interference with nature by supernatural power.” Naturalists: “Those who believe that nothing exists except nature.” Supernaturalists: “Those who believe that, besides nature, there exists something else.” Nature: Defined by naturalists as “everything there is.” More rigorously, the ...


3

I've read several of Lewis's works (Narnia series, Great Divorce, Mere Christianity, pieces of a few others), and I'm not aware of any of his writings that suggest what that author describes. Certainly, Lewis had some very interesting views about what life will be like after we die (or after the return of Christ). In The Last Battle, "heaven" is depicted ...


3

Lewis is pointing out that if the object of hope can never be attained as a better state (i.e., it is better to seek with anticipation than to find), then true hope is impossible (with the exclusion of false perception, i.e., "and known to be true"). One cannot hope for a worse state. One could say that in the glorified state hope is no longer significant. ...


3

Significant events that occurred roughly 100yrs before he wrote this quote: On the Origin of Species was published on 24 November 1859. Not only did this work by Darwin directly influenced State Atheism, it also drastically changed how scientists and schools perceived the world. The transition from the Industrial Revolution ended in about 1830-40. ...


3

In chapter 9 ("Charity") of book III ("Christian Behaviour") of Mere Christianity, Lewis writes: It would be quite wrong to think that the way to become charitable is to sit trying to manufacture affectionate feelings. Some people are "cold" by temperament; that may be a misfortune for them, but it is no more a sin than having a bad digestion is a sin; ...


2

Of note is that the sea symbolizes several things for the Jewish people in antiquity, most notably disaster or ruin. For the most part, the ancient Jews were not seafaring people. Deuteronomy 28:68 gives them a stern warning against disobedience, clearly stating that disobedience would ultimately lead to a re-enslavement with the notable inclusion of being ...



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