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Tradition says Jesus was betrayed late Thursday night, was crucified and buried before sundown on Friday. Jesus went to the garden of Gethsemane late in the evening, and prayed there for some time. A reasonable guess would be that it was Midnight to 2 AM by the time Judas led the soldiers there to arrest Jesus. Mark 15:25 says it was "the third hour" when ...


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Mark's Gospel makes it clear that the betrayal took place at midnight and the crucifixion was at 9 am, a difference of nine hours. In this, the first New Testament Gospel to be written, the last twenty four hours in the life of Jesus are described in a chiastic structure, in which an opening set of events (A-D) is mirrored by a second set (D'-A'): A The ...


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When I was in Yeshiva, this question came up during a lunch with a visiting priest, that Jesus descended in order to free the souls of those who did not know him. That is to say that the people who died before Jesus was born had no salvation. Basically, the priest put it simply that Jesus freed his Jewish forefathers so that the Jews would be able to ...


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This may be difficult to ascertain with any great degree of certainty, but we may be able to get close. The Time of Betrayal If, by the "moment of betrayal", you are referring to the Judas' kiss, then there are a few things we know. We know the disciples were having a hard time staying awake even during the first time Jesus went away to pray, and Jesus ...


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There are two obvious options - either they were the same people or they were not - with no supporting evidence for either. John Shelby Spong provides a third option that I find convincing. The story of the crowd welcoming Jesus into Jerusalem is closely based on a Jewish tradition that occurred each year, but at an entirely different time. Spong says in ...


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I have often wondered this myself but never really formulated a thoughtful answer. I have tried to search through various commentaries for an in-depth explanation and also to no avail. I put then the things that stand out to me as an explanation from the wider view of the gospel story. Firs this is a key verse to have some context: 7 A man called ...


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In Exodus 12, the Hebrews celebrated the Passover on the 14th day of the first month of the year, it is called Abib in Hebrew (like January in our calendar today). After coming back from the Babylonian exile, they call Abib by a Babylonian name which is Nisan. So Abib 14 or Nisan 14 every year is the day of the Passover. Fast forward to the time of Jesus, ...


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The Greek work kleptes refers to a common thief; but in Matthew and Mark's account of the thieves crucified, the Greek word lestes is used, which has the root meaning "to plunder." Though we don't have information on the nature of their crimes, the use of this term indicates they were probably a part of a rebel group.


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Sin by definition is separation from God. When The Christ uttered these words, He, Who from all eternity, had known only complete "oneness" with the Father, was completely separated from the Father. The sin of all the world had cast Him into total darkness and "aloneness." Broken (not by The Father, not by The Son... but by sin) was the eternal union.



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