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9

The short answer is "yes, sort of". The only sub-group within Christianity that I'm aware of that cares about whether the animals in the Garden of Eden were originally carnivorous or not are the Young Earth Creationists. To other groups, it's simply a non-issue. Only within the young-earth paradigm do you get the idea that there was no physical death ...


9

You're right, creationism, of whatever variety, is not scientifically falsifiable. Creationists do not think this is a problem. In fact, they would say that all alternatives to creationism are equally unfalsifiable. The scientific method cannot test the past; it may be able to tell us what is possible, what is likely and what is unlikely, but it ultimately ...


8

The Church of England has not taken a stand on the simplified 'creation versus evolution' debate. Many people investigating this have reported being unable to find a clear positional statement from the CofE, and there are quotes from church leaders stating that they believe there is no official position. This is an example. The church has made pronouncements ...


8

I think it's clear that your assumption is wrong, and that figurative interpretations of the Genesis were always common amongst scholarly interpreters, such as for example St. Augustine. At the very least, he thinks that the transgression in the Garden of Eden was in fact of a sexual nature, and therefore the account as it is, is figurative. Further, we are ...


7

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has 289 Among all the Scriptural texts about creation, the first three chapters of Genesis occupy a unique place. From a literary standpoint these texts may have had diverse sources. the inspired authors have placed them at the beginning of Scripture to express in their solemn language the truths of creation — ...


7

As a YEC - I think David Stratton has presented a good overview of our belief regarding animals (and human beings) being herbivorous before the fall, and that we use the Bible as our only canonical writing (though as I commented on his answer, we do not believe that every word in the Bible is meant to be taken literally, there are many figurative and poetic ...


6

The Biblical basis for claiming that Eve was created after the sixth day is one from inference instead of literalism. The account in Genesis 1 starts with all the creatures first, then man on the sixth day. Chapter two continues on describing a different time of creation, or a smaller, second creation, if you will. The story in Genesis two has Adam created ...


6

Doctrine and Covenants 105:53-56 53 Three years previous to the death of Adam, he called Seth, Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, Jared, Enoch, and Methuselah, who were all high priests, with the residue of his posterity who were righteous, into the valley of Adam-ondi-Ahman, and there bestowed upon them his last blessing. 54 And the Lord appeared ...


5

It's not a matter of theories or facts, it's a matter of personal worldviews. All people (whether scientists or not) interpret facts through their individual worldviews. A person with a creationist worldview will interpret a fact one way, while a person with an evolutionist worldview will interpret the same fact quite differently. For example, in 1963, ...


5

Your question is a creative one and as humans we tend to think in human terms. In our day however we have a greater capacity of understanding how such things could even be possible. I'm going to use the example of computer games as what might be a humanly relatable comparison. I'm usually not one to use elaborate world-oriented illustrations, but this ...


5

One thing that I think other answers have missed is that "creationism" means different things to different people. The definition one uses is vital to whether or not it is falsifiable* in a scientific sense. For instance, if one states that creationism means: All life has existed in or close to its present form since the beginning of the earth Then ...


4

The answer to this question is similar to the answer I gave for your other question. We read in Genesis 1:27-31 that God created man (as a race) and created both male and female. Jump ahead to Genesis 2:18-25 we see the detailed creation of Eve (and prior to that, Adam). These events both take place on the same day, the sixth, which is supported by ...


4

Although a traditional understanding of Creation is 'ex nihilo' - out of nothing, it can be seen from one of the passages quoted by another answer (John 1:1-3) and also the following: By faith we understand that the worlds were set in order at God’s command, so that the visible has its origin in the invisible. - Hebrews 11:3 NET (cf. other versions) ...


4

Yes, the canonical writings of some (most?) Christian groups does say if animals in Eden were carnivorous and when they became carnivorous; and as for your title (bible as opposed to canonical Christian writings), also yes it is addressed. That is the blunt answer and technically a full one considering your question. However, you likely want to know not ...


4

You appear to be making the most prevalent misconception that people make. That misconception is that the physical realm is the true realm, while in truth it is the Spiritual realm which is predominant. Just so that I do not confuse you let me explain things this way. The physical realm exists in the Spiritual realm. By that what is meant is that the ...


4

Reasons to Believe is an organization which presents arguments in favor of Old Earth Creation, and on their Who We Are page, founder Hugh Ross states: One of the approaches I've developed, with the help of my RTB colleagues, is a biblical creation model that is testable, falsifiable, and predictive. Their web site offers an overview of their ...


3

The basis for the belief that Eve was created on the 6th day is a literal interpretation of Genesis 1. Genesis 1:26-28 ESV Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing ...


3

There is a definite difference between trying to foretell an unknown future and seeing things unfold and knowing what's going on. I don't have to be a meteorologist to know that when dark clouds start gathering overhead there's a chance it might rain. A good representation of this is in Revelation: "I watched as he opened the sixth seal. There was a great ...


3

My answer here is an adaptation of part of my answer to a related question on Hermeneutics.SE: The purpose of 'rest' In two of his books (listed below), John H. Walton examines Genesis 1.1-2.3 according to its similarities to other 'creation myths' in the ancient near east (ANE from here onward), verbal cues with contemporary or related Hebrew ...


3

There are no other common Christian denominations that believe in a pre-mortal existence. There are instances of individual Christians with this belief. Clementine, quoting Peter, said in Clementine Recognitions: Last of all He made man whose real nature, however, is older and for whose sake all this was created. Origen of Alexandria (ca. 200 AD) ...


3

When Michael Angelo looked at a large block of stone, he already new in his mind what he wanted the outcome to be. He didn't just start chiseling away hoping for the best. I believe God was telling Jeremiah that before he came into existence, He knew how He was going to use him. He was born to be Jeremiah the Prophet. God had set his course even before he ...


3

Starting with the second question, the Magisterial teaching of the Church likewise finds both decisions to be bad All things considered, it needs to be recognized that the thousands of abandoned embryos represent a situation of injustice which in fact cannot be resolved. Therefore John Paul II made an “appeal to the conscience of the world’s scientific ...


3

Most English-language Bibles begin with "In the beginning, God created the heaven and the earth," although the first three Hebrew words of Genesis are: "בראשית ברא אלהים" (B'reishit bara Elohim). There is no definite article and the grammar is complex, if not confusing, but there is a general consensus among scholars that this can not be translated correctly ...


2

The 1909 Pontifical Biblical Commission said: The word “day” [םוי = yom] need not be taken in the literal sense of a natural day of 24 hours, but can also be understood in the improper sense of a longer space of time. See this for more info. So for Catholics there is no inconsistency. Pope Pius XII spoke of the compatibility of the Catholic faith ...


2

I am adding a bit more to this question as this view point has not been explored in the other answers: Genesis 2:1-3: Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made. And God blessed the seventh day, ...


2

There are two separate accounts of creation in the book of Genesis. The first, which occupies the first chapter, describes the creation of the world, life, and humanity in the "7 Day" format. On the 6th day, God creates mankind, both male and female. In the second creation story which starts at Genesis 2:2 recounts the familiar story of Adam (a name which ...


2

I think it is clear enough from the text in Genesis 1 that Adam and Eve were created on the sixth day. On the fifth day God created the fishes and birds, and On the sixth day God created wild animals and Adam and Eve. Let me post the whole passage for clarification with my own emphasis. Notice that between the "fifth day" and the "sixth day", there is the ...


2

From what you've quoted above, it seems that they believe in progressive creationism which is the believe that all things were created over a long period of time, however not through evolution. Theistic evolution is more along the lines of what you're saying, which is basically that God guided the evolution process. Jehovah's Witness believe that God formed ...


2

I'll try to summarize some of the infos we can find in the JW.org site (wol.jw.org) First, have a look at their Awake! 9/06 magazine, pages 9-10, the article titled "Did God Use Evolution to Create Life?" As a summary, it says that the Bible’s account of the creation of the first man, Adam, is to be taken literally. It also says that Jesus (and his ...


2

Yes, the bible says that God created matter, time, space, logic, physics, etc... out of nothing. John 1:1-3 ESV In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. So, with a plain interpretation of the ...



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