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15

Jesus did not make an explicit statement on the matter, but he did seem to take Genesis as true and historical in some sense. Consider Jesus's words in Mark 10:6ff on divorce: "But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one ...


11

The Bible does recognise the existence of heavenly bodies of some sort, and the fact that they move and come and go during the year: Gen 1 14 And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years. However it calls them lights, which is how ...


9

The short answer is "yes, sort of". The only sub-group within Christianity that I'm aware of that cares about whether the animals in the Garden of Eden were originally carnivorous or not are the Young Earth Creationists. To other groups, it's simply a non-issue. Only within the young-earth paradigm do you get the idea that there was no physical death ...


8

The Church of England has not taken a stand on the simplified 'creation versus evolution' debate. Many people investigating this have reported being unable to find a clear positional statement from the CofE, and there are quotes from church leaders stating that they believe there is no official position. This is an example. The church has made pronouncements ...


8

I think it's clear that your assumption is wrong, and that figurative interpretations of the Genesis were always common amongst scholarly interpreters, such as for example St. Augustine. At the very least, he thinks that the transgression in the Garden of Eden was in fact of a sexual nature, and therefore the account as it is, is figurative. Further, we are ...


7

Doctrine does not make claims about the definitions that biologists (or others) use. If someone wanted to assert that the earth is billions of years old, then someone's doctrine may contradict that assertion, but it is not a doctrinal assertion to argue about what is meant by macro- or microevolution. If someone has an issue with macroevolution (e.g. ...


7

Micro and macroevolution are non-ideal terms because they indicate that the issue is the size of changes, whereas the real issue is the type of changes. Adaptation (and natural selection) are undeniable, but they consist of changes that shuffle and modify genetic information that is already in existence. By contrast 'macroevolution' involves adding new ...


7

Jesus did not give an opinion about the matter in any case, so there is no factual basis on which to answer the question. There is simply no recorded dialogue in Scripture about creation, save that marriage was instituted by God from the beginning. That said, based on: John 1:1 (by Him everything was made that was made) John 8:58 (before Abraham was, I ...


7

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has 289 Among all the Scriptural texts about creation, the first three chapters of Genesis occupy a unique place. From a literary standpoint these texts may have had diverse sources. the inspired authors have placed them at the beginning of Scripture to express in their solemn language the truths of creation — ...


7

As a YEC - I think David Stratton has presented a good overview of our belief regarding animals (and human beings) being herbivorous before the fall, and that we use the Bible as our only canonical writing (though as I commented on his answer, we do not believe that every word in the Bible is meant to be taken literally, there are many figurative and poetic ...


6

The crux of this question is really How long was it before Adam and Eve sinned? The biblical record only has the following facts: Adam and Eve's first child was Cain, and the second Abel, by virtue of Genesis 4. Genesis 4 also suggests that Seth was not born until after Cain killed Abel, an act that could not have occurred in the Garden. Genesis 5 says ...


6

The Biblical basis for claiming that Eve was created after the sixth day is one from inference instead of literalism. The account in Genesis 1 starts with all the creatures first, then man on the sixth day. Chapter two continues on describing a different time of creation, or a smaller, second creation, if you will. The story in Genesis two has Adam created ...


5

The answer can actually be found in the very next verse: 35 But only an account of this earth, and the inhabitants thereof, give I unto you. For behold, there are many worlds that have passed away by the word of my power. And there are many that now stand, and innumerable are they unto man; but all things are numbered unto me, for they are mine and I ...


5

Creationism is built on the assumption that there is a God, and the assumption that this God is the God described in the Bible. If you don't believe either of these things are true, then you cannot logically believe creation science. However, if you believe that both these things are true, then creation science becomes a logical possibility (although not ...


5

It's not a matter of theories or facts, it's a matter of personal worldviews. All people (whether scientists or not) interpret facts through their individual worldviews. A person with a creationist worldview will interpret a fact one way, while a person with an evolutionist worldview will interpret the same fact quite differently. For example, in 1963, ...


5

Doctrine and Covenants 105:53-56 53 Three years previous to the death of Adam, he called Seth, Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, Jared, Enoch, and Methuselah, who were all high priests, with the residue of his posterity who were righteous, into the valley of Adam-ondi-Ahman, and there bestowed upon them his last blessing. 54 And the Lord appeared ...


5

Your question is a creative one and as humans we tend to think in human terms. In our day however we have a greater capacity of understanding how such things could even be possible. I'm going to use the example of computer games as what might be a humanly relatable comparison. I'm usually not one to use elaborate world-oriented illustrations, but this ...


4

People don't seem to believe in the firmament as a literal barrier of water up in the sky that collapsed at Noah's flood. The answer to this is amazingly simple. Many Young-Earth Creationists believe that there was a layer of water of some form (ice, water, other possibilities) in the upper atmosphere, or in space, surrounding the earth AND ...


4

The garden of Eden was a physical place. It was believed to be situated south of Lake Van in Turkey. Ancient Turkey. We cannot know the exact location of Eden because of the flood. The flood could have changed the geography of the whole area. It almost certainly would change how the 4 rivers flowed. Those 4 rivers are really the only way of knowing the ...


4

They are just there to display the glory of God. The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands. (Psalm 19:1, NIV) When we look at the sun, the moon, solar systems, galaxies, we see how great is our God and how big is our God. The universe declares the glory of God. The more we know about the universe, the more we are ...


4

There is a relatively large and active community engaged in reconciling the current claims of mainstream biological science with what is known as "Young Earth Creationism." Young Earth Creationists believe that God's creation of the earth took seven literal twenty-four-hour days, and that it took place roughly 6,000 years ago. It is common among that ...


4

I come from a Reformed background and though I know this is not something all Reformed people believe, I know that my church holds that there are many theological hills to die on, but the creation account is not one of them. The main point of the creation account is to chow God's omnipotence and THAT He created the world. How exactly He created the world is ...


4

The answer to this question is similar to the answer I gave for your other question. We read in Genesis 1:27-31 that God created man (as a race) and created both male and female. Jump ahead to Genesis 2:18-25 we see the detailed creation of Eve (and prior to that, Adam). These events both take place on the same day, the sixth, which is supported by ...


4

Although a traditional understanding of Creation is 'ex nihilo' - out of nothing, it can be seen from one of the passages quoted by another answer (John 1:1-3) and also the following: By faith we understand that the worlds were set in order at God’s command, so that the visible has its origin in the invisible. - Hebrews 11:3 NET (cf. other versions) ...


4

Yes, the canonical writings of some (most?) Christian groups does say if animals in Eden were carnivorous and when they became carnivorous; and as for your title (bible as opposed to canonical Christian writings), also yes it is addressed. That is the blunt answer and technically a full one considering your question. However, you likely want to know not ...


4

You appear to be making the most prevalent misconception that people make. That misconception is that the physical realm is the true realm, while in truth it is the Spiritual realm which is predominant. Just so that I do not confuse you let me explain things this way. The physical realm exists in the Spiritual realm. By that what is meant is that the ...


3

Here is an obscure answer that appears to have surfaced in the mid-1800s: The purpose of the greater universe i.e. “stars etc.” is addressed in: Witness of the Stars, by E. W. Bullinger Essentially, Bullinger along with others advanced that God in creation established the “Gospel” message in the stars. He goes into great detail within his book to show how ...


3

The interpretation of verse doesn’t say God “needed” to rest; but that God stopped His acts of creation on the seventh day. Genesis 2:2 And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done. The Hebrew word “u•ishbth” when translated has one of the main definitions as “to ...


3

My answer here is an adaptation of part of my answer to a related question on Hermeneutics.SE: The purpose of 'rest' In two of his books (listed below), John H. Walton examines Genesis 1.1-2.3 according to its similarities to other 'creation myths' in the ancient near east (ANE from here onward), verbal cues with contemporary or related Hebrew ...


3

The context of this verse: The wolf will live with the lamb, the leopard will lie down with the goat, the calf and the lion and the yearling together; and a little child will lead them. The cow will feed with the bear, their young will lie down together, and the lion will eat straw like the ox. The infant will play near the cobra’s den, and the young ...



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