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It has more to do with the translators and languages than the bible itself. The word Testament is derived from Latin testamentum-a will. I understand you confuse it with the modern meaning of the word, but Blue Letter Bible tries to explain it as follows: The word "testament" is an old English word that means, "covenant." The Latin term testamentum was ...


4

Yes, it is a bilateral covenant! This is the new covenant, Jeremiah 31:31-34 (NIV) : “The days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the people of Israel and with the people of Judah. It will not be like the covenant I made with their ancestors when I took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt, because they broke my ...


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Yes, the New Covenant is a bilateral covenant, and Dan the Man covers many of the salient points. I would also like to add a few points from the book of Hebrews, which gives a beautiful and in-depth description of how the New Covenant is so much better than the Old Covenant (Starting in Heb 7:11 and running through the end of chapter 10). But first, here's ...


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My answer may not be extensive due to time restraints, but I think it's important to emphasize this main point. The old covenant (Jer. 31:32), which the Israelites entered into at Sinai (Exo. 24:7), cannot be eternal because it never promised eternal life to the Israelites. Instead of eternal life, God (the other party of the covenant) promised that the ...


2

Both the Gospels and the Epistles repeatedly establish the New Covenant as a non-legalistic relationship with God --a new relationship not founded in following specific rules. However, as Paul says, not everything that is allowed is beneficial. As a Christian, you need to be guided by your relationship with Christ and by a spirit of discernment to ...


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You have asked a great question and in order to answer it we have to do some reexamining of the Covenants, and what actually each means and with whom they were made. So bear with me this going to be a bit long winded. First Let's take them in the order in which each was made and with whom. Genesis 17:7 KJV And I will establish my covenant between me ...


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Answering from the Reformed perspective: There are essentially two covenants. The first covenant was with Adam, and is called the covenant of works. Adam was bound to obey the command not to eat of the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. If he obeyed, he would live. If he disobeyed, he would die. Adam disobeyed, and his sin, because of ...


1

God's covenant's are neither unilateral nor bilateral, but they are colateral, meaning that even though Jesus" has been made a propitiation for us and taken the anger of God on our behalf and is the mediator of the new covenant, The covenant itself, set up by God himself to reconcile his creation, man, male and female, back to himself, this covenant is made ...


1

From a sole fide or sola gratia perspective, the New Covenant is inherently unilateral. Probably the most famous verse on grace - Ephesians 2:8-9, states it explicitly: For by grace, you are saved through faith. It is not through any work of your own lest any man should boast. A bi-lateral covenant would entail work on the other party. Grace ...


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The First Covenant is unilateral: When the sun had set and darkness had fallen, a smoking firepot with a blazing torch appeared and passed between the pieces. On that day the Lord made a covenant with Abram.... Genesis 15: 17-18a My understanding on this point comes from a sermon by Tullian Tchvidjian, but I have found similar explanation of contract ...


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Mat 26:28 For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. Strong's Greek Word Testament G1242 διαθήκη diathēkē dee-ath-ay'-kay From G1303; properly a disposition, that is, (specifically) a contract (especially a devisory will): - covenant, testament. Thesaurus Devisor ...


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The Bible is a pretty thick book when you come right down to it. Yet, so few spend any time researching 3/4's of it, while relying on the end to interpret the beginning. That is not how one should read any book. The plan of God is not written backwards. So the question is "Why did God give a 'New Covenant'"? Well, believe it or not, the answer flies in ...



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