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9

If God had created Christianity first, people would not have known their need for a Saviour. "What do we need to be saved from? So God first sets up a do-it-yourself religion; by which I mean that if the Jews followed all the laws they could save themselves earning their right to heaven. That didn't work. Worse, some people became more interested in the ...


8

It has more to do with the translators and languages than the bible itself. The word Testament is derived from Latin testamentum-a will. I understand you confuse it with the modern meaning of the word, but Blue Letter Bible tries to explain it as follows: The word "testament" is an old English word that means, "covenant." The Latin term testamentum was ...


6

I think it is as easy as you suspect. Hebrews does focus on the superiority of the New Covenant a little more from the ceremonial perspective than does some of the other Epistles, as this had more meaning to a Jewish audience. However this superiority of the blood of Christ, versus blood of bulls only has meaning as it satisfies the moral demands of the ...


5

God's Standard Should Be Our Standard The biblical standard regarding marriage, from Genesis to Revelation is One groom, one bride, what e'er betide. Or in slightly less old fashioned verbiage: One husband, one wife, for life. God never sanctioned polygyny in the Tanakh, nor did Jesus sanction it in the New Covenant. God's design from the ...


5

The closest that any of the NT books come to even mentioning polygamy are the pastoral epistles when Paul says that a leader must be the husband of one wife. Since this is the only implied mention, there is no basis to say that there is support of polygamy in the new covenant. 2 Timothy 3:1-2 ESV The saying is trustworthy: If anyone aspires to the office ...


5

It's not quite right to emphasize commandments. They are the Ten Words (dabar in Hebrew). They express so much more than mere commands. For example, this law that God establishes, these "commandments" and statutes and rules that He gives are founded on the fact that He has already saved His people. We see this in the giving of the law on Sinai. “I am ...


4

Yes, it is a bilateral covenant! This is the new covenant, Jeremiah 31:31-34 (NIV) : “The days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the people of Israel and with the people of Judah. It will not be like the covenant I made with their ancestors when I took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt, because they broke my ...


4

Yes, the New Covenant is a bilateral covenant, and Dan the Man covers many of the salient points. I would also like to add a few points from the book of Hebrews, which gives a beautiful and in-depth description of how the New Covenant is so much better than the Old Covenant (Starting in Heb 7:11 and running through the end of chapter 10). But first, here's ...


4

Who first developed this concept of a covenant of grace? Much like the doctrine of the trinity, to proponents of the doctrine, the answer is, "It comes from the Bible." But obviously the actual historical development and refinement of definitions is less straight-forward than that. But do keep in mind that to those explicating covenant theology, all they're ...


4

Since your question focuses on dual covenant theology's biblical basis, I will cite the main points and verses and leave you to research the major proponents' more complex arguments in their writings at your leisure: After the Great Flood, God imposed a set of laws on Noah and his family and their descendants (Genesis 9:3-10), which makes them binding on ...


3

What's the justification for believing that God interacts with us today the same way He did thousands of years ago? In a word: Experience. Consider the value the following men place on experience: “This grace of God is a very great, strong, mighty and active thing. It does not lie asleep in the soul. Grace hears, leads, drives, draws, changes, works ...


3

You have asked a great question and in order to answer it we have to do some reexamining of the Covenants, and what actually each means and with whom they were made. So bear with me this going to be a bit long winded. First Let's take them in the order in which each was made and with whom. Genesis 17:7 KJV And I will establish my covenant between me ...


3

My answer may not be extensive due to time restraints, but I think it's important to emphasize this main point. The old covenant (Jer. 31:32), which the Israelites entered into at Sinai (Exo. 24:7), cannot be eternal because it never promised eternal life to the Israelites. Instead of eternal life, God (the other party of the covenant) promised that the ...


3

Here is a list of the covenants which the Bible explicitly describes God making. It is possible that there are other covenants (such as with Adam), but the Bible does not use covenantal language to talk about them. The Noahic covenant, which God made in Genesis 9:8-10 with all humans and land animals/birds, in which he promised to never again flood the ...


3

There are several views of the covenants within the Reformed/Calvinist camp, broadly defined. The traditional view is that the covenants are unified and that the New Covenant is new in the sense of "new and improved" rather than radically new (cf. Rom. 11 for how Gentiles are grafted into the continuing tree started with Abraham and in Gal. 3 how the law ...


2

Many reformed theologians would begin a discussion on the topic of covenants with the way they understand the biblical covenants to be formulated. God uses language and objects we understand to relate His truth to us. Many Reformed theologians also believe that he used a covenantal structure called a suzreinty vassal treaty which was common among the ...


2

The Mosaic Law is best understood from its moral code as a renewed covenant of works first enjoined over Adam and the whole human race. However, it was so renewed with an inlaid ceremony, predicting the promise of a better covenant, according to grace in a future Messiah, that it did not contravene the previous covent of grace given to Abraham, according to ...


2

Answering from the Reformed perspective: There are essentially two covenants. The first covenant was with Adam, and is called the covenant of works. Adam was bound to obey the command not to eat of the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. If he obeyed, he would live. If he disobeyed, he would die. Adam disobeyed, and his sin, because of ...


2

Both the Gospels and the Epistles repeatedly establish the New Covenant as a non-legalistic relationship with God --a new relationship not founded in following specific rules. However, as Paul says, not everything that is allowed is beneficial. As a Christian, you need to be guided by your relationship with Christ and by a spirit of discernment to ...


2

There is the line of the shifting of the birthright in Bible. In Genesis alone, there are at least four cases of the shifting of the birthright: from Esau to Jacob (25:22-26, 29-34); from Zarah to Pharez (38:27-30); from Reuben to Joseph (49:3-4; 1 Chron. 5:1); and from Manasseh to Ephraim (48:12-20). Furthermore, in the New Testament the birthright is ...


2

Honestly, there are a lot of questions there and rather than skip around I'm going to give one really long background on the birthright and blessing. Just be glad I'm not also giving a treatment to the meaning of firstborn. There is a TL;DR Conclusion at the end, where I will revisit each specific question. But first there is a lot of groundwork to lay. ...


1

I take the passage as God having one covenant with Israel, and Israel, having to make two attempts to respond to that covenant. The covenant is the promise from God, and it is not affected by the fact that the first set of tablets was broken; the second set of tablets was proof that the covenant endured.


1

I assume you are talking about the tablets of the Ten Commandments which Moses broke in Exodus 32:19, then the second set of tablets made in Exodus 34:4. You are wondering if God wrote something different on the second set. Exodus 34:1 gives us the answer to your question: "Cut two tablets of stone like the first ones, and I will write on these tablets the ...


1

The First Covenant is unilateral: When the sun had set and darkness had fallen, a smoking firepot with a blazing torch appeared and passed between the pieces. On that day the Lord made a covenant with Abram.... Genesis 15: 17-18a My understanding on this point comes from a sermon by Tullian Tchvidjian, but I have found similar explanation of contract ...


1

Your question kind of hops around, but I can say that the justification for that belief is the verse you provide plus some others Hebrews 13:8 ESV Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever. Malachi 3:6 ESV For I the Lord do not change James 1:17 ESV Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the ...


1

God's covenant's are neither unilateral nor bilateral, but they are colateral, meaning that even though Jesus" has been made a propitiation for us and taken the anger of God on our behalf and is the mediator of the new covenant, The covenant itself, set up by God himself to reconcile his creation, man, male and female, back to himself, this covenant is made ...


1

From a sole fide or sola gratia perspective, the New Covenant is inherently unilateral. Probably the most famous verse on grace - Ephesians 2:8-9, states it explicitly: For by grace, you are saved through faith. It is not through any work of your own lest any man should boast. A bi-lateral covenant would entail work on the other party. Grace ...


1

Although we often find various covenants spoken of in scripture such as the covenant with Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, etc. there are really only two covenants between God and man. The remaining covenants are merely modifications, progressions, or what might be called dispensations of the only two covenants. The first covenant is the covenant of works ...


1

It is certainly not unilateral. In a unilateral covenant, only one party must assent to the terms of the covenant in order for it to be ratified. For example, the covenant enacted in Gen. 15:12 is unilateral because Avraham was in a deep sleep when God alone passed between the split animal pieces (Gen. 15:17), signifying ratification of the covenant. Since ...


1

The Mosaic covenant is not a republication of the covenant of works. First, "republication" assumes a previous covenant of works, in the garden, and that is a matter of serious dispute. If there were no covenant of works in the garden, then the Mosaic Covenant could not be a republication. But for the sake of argument, I'll assume that the relationship ...



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