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22

I have heard two explanations for this. I tend to think the second one is much more sound in the context given but I will offer them both for reference. First of all, the passage in question is 1 Corinthians 14:34. The first explanation I've heard is that at the time, most women were poorly educated and had a difficult time participating in the discussions ...


13

Order, Authority and Peace Would you ever dare to mention that the Holy Spirit is subject to the authority and/or control of a Man? If you cannot fathom that the Holy Spirit would ever be subjected to man then you do not understand order and peace. 1 Corinthians 14:32-33 NIV 32 The spirits of prophets are subject to the control of prophets. 33 ...


9

As a "Pharisee amongst Pharisees," Paul would have seen the Scriptures as the Scriptures of the Jews - the Torah, the Ketu'vim, and the Nevi'im, or as we say in English, the Law, the Writings, and the Prophets. When Jesus was on the transfiguration mount, he prefigured this. These Scriptures are the Old Testament to modern Christians, or "the Hebrew Bible" ...


7

This article provides a good summary of the historical and current practices within Christianity regarding head coverings. Basically for large portions of Christianity wearing some kind of head covering before the 20th century was the norm, even for Protestants: Among the Protestant reformers, Martin Luther's wife, Katherine, wore a headcovering in ...


5

Abstract The spiritual gift of tongues serves one purpose: communication where ordinary language skills do not serve. Paul saw prophecy as useful to non-believers even though its primary purpose is for the edification of believers. But speaking in a language the unbeliever does not understand fails to accomplish any purpose at all. A little context is ...


4

Even if the premise that Christ had longer hair is true, it would not matter as that is not the point of this passage. If it is read in context i.e. read the chapter before and after, it is clear that Paul is talking about how Jewish customs and how even though they are no longer necessary due to Christ's sacrifice, they should still be observed if you are ...


4

Being as there is no image of Jesus that has any historical credibility, the question is based on a faulty premise. We simply do not know what Jesus' hair looked like. The paintings to which you allude tend to be those painted by the European masters in the 16th & 17th Centuries. At the time, it was fashionable for men to have longer hair, and thus it ...


4

John Gills exposition of the Bible always explained it the best for me: The bread and cup are called the bread and cup of the Lord; these may be eaten and drank "unworthily", when they are eaten and drank by unworthy persons, in an unworthy manner, and to unworthy ends and purposes. The Lord's supper may be taken unworthily, when it is partook of ...


3

In context (which is crucial to understanding virtually anything in Scripture), the Corinthian Christians were engaged in behaviors which, prima facie, would be labeled "unworthy"; hence, they were participating in the Lord's Supper unworthily. Here is a partial list of the way various Bible versions translate unworthily: in an unworthy manner (by ...


3

RadzMatthewCoBrown asks: "What does the phrase "saved as by fire" in 1 Corinthians 3:15 mean? If any man's work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire." Catholic Perspective 1 Cor 3:15 is a standard verse used by Catholic apologists to support their idea of purgatory. They say this verse spells out that the ...


3

At the time of the writing of Paul's epistle to the Corinthians, Paul had served three missions, the most recent of which lasted several years. He is speaking to those men who would be called to the ministry, and likewise serve missions abroad, traveling and preaching away from home and loved ones. He is explaining that it is easier for an unmarried man to ...


3

Since Paul didn't expand on this, the best we can do is to review what noted theologians have said about this. To get some good answers, you really need to look no further than Bible commentaries. Bear in mind that the type of love here is agape love, which is also translated as charity, or selfless love. It's not speaking of romantic love as on "love ...


3

Since Paul was coming to deal with a sinning church member, he is back referencing Jesus' command on dealing with sins in the church in Matthew 18: But if he does not listen to you, take one or two more with you, so that BY THE MOUTH OF TWO OR THREE WITNESSES EVERY FACT MAY BE CONFIRMED. Which is itself a reference to Deuteronomy 19:15: A single ...


2

The book of Revelation refers to the final judgment (Rev. 20:11-13; NASB quoted): Then I saw a great white throne and Him who sat upon it, from whose presence earth and heaven fled away, and no place was found for them. And I saw the dead, the great and the small, standing before the throne, and books were opened; and another book was opened, which is ...


2

The preceding verses answers your question: 6 Your glorying is not good. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump? 7Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: 8Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the ...


2

You appear to be misreading the Scripture, in order to understand a verse of Scripture we must also read and understand the other verses before and after the one we want to understand, and sometimes we even have to read and understand the Chapters before and after the one containing our verse. Sometimes we even have to understand what the entire book is ...


2

1 Corinthians 13 is one of those chapters that tends to be read at weddings and get taken out of context. Because of its association with weddings, many associate it with romantic love, and David Stratton is right to say clearly that this is not what Paul was thinking about. If you look at chapter 12, you'll see that Paul was addressing the issue of the ...


2

Most commentaries point toward the idea that the individual loses all, and because of this, is convinced of the need of salvation. Put another way, trials and tribulations make the individual realize the need for Christ. They burn away all the non-essentials, and leave only that which is pure and true. Some examples to back up that answer: Gill's ...


2

An Evangelical perspective: This verse should be understood in its context (the whole chapter) and a key verse for putting it in the right perspective is verse 13: their work will be clearly seen, because the Day of Judgment will make it visible. That Day will appear with fire, and the fire will test everyone’s work to show what sort of work it was. - 1 ...


1

A Catholic Sacred Scripture Interpretation bruisedreed's answer has the gist of it. 1 Cor 3:11-15 (RSVCE) 11 For no other foundation can any one lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ. 12 Now if any one builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble— 13 each man’s work will become manifest; for the ...


1

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: Catechism of the Catholic Church 1825 Christ died out of love for us, while we were still "enemies." [Rom 5:10]. The Lord asks us to love as he does, even our enemies, to make ourselves the neighbor of those farthest away, and to love children and the poor as Christ himself. [cf. Mt 5:44; Lk 10:27-37; ...


1

By studying Christ's teachings on love, we can get a better understanding of the belief of love. He gives us an idea of how strong his love us for us in John 15, as well as guidance on how to love one another. He loves us as the Father loves him. If we obey, we remain in his love. He states we're his friends and that everything he's learned from his ...


1

That specific phrase is present in the New International Version: Now, brothers and sisters, I have applied these things to myself and Apollos for your benefit, so that you may learn from us the meaning of the saying, "Do not go beyond what is written." Then you will not be puffed up in being a follower of one of us over against the other. The meaning ...


1

The Scripture 1 Corinthians 15:1-5 (NET) - 15:1 Now I want to make clear for you,1 brothers and sisters, the gospel that I preached to you, that you received and on which you stand, 15:2 and by which you are being saved, if you hold firmly to the message I preached to you—unless you believed in vain. 15:3 For I passed on to you as of first importance ...


1

I believe mature, spiritual Christians who know what the bible says are called to judge behavior accordingly. (See John 7:24, Galatians 6:15. 2 Corinthians 2:15, 2 John 10) There are so many examples in the bible where the early Christians had to resolve conflict in the church (thus judging a behavior) and deal with the perpetrators. I'm so tired of ...


1

The following is a Bible based answer. This is what Jehovah's Witnesses Believe. These words to still apply today in the sense that there are many who claim to be Christians who are not really living as Christians and are promoting beliefs that do not harmonize with true Christianity as taught in the Bible. The ones doing this are helping Satan to ...


1

This is one of those passages that is more metaphorical and should be taken in context with the entire passage, and, like the entire New Testament, it should be taken in context with common Judaic beliefs of the day. The people to whom Paul is speaking know what heaven is supposed to be like. The resurrection of the dead and the paradise that awaits is ...


1

It seems that in Corinthians some women were assuming to much in the equality and liberty that the gospel provided them. They supposed since thy were equal they could 'speak in public gatherings' as though exercising authority over others including men. There may have been other fellowship gatherings where they could exercise gifts of prophesy such as ...


1

Judges are not merely for the purpose of dispensing punishments, one tenet of being a judge is to restore order. From wikipedia: A biblical judge (Hebrew: shôphatîm or shoftim שופטים) is "a ruler or a military leader, as well as someone who presided over legal hearings." "Legal hearings" could include sentencing punishment but also establishing one's ...



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