Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

The issue with copyright translations. One translation that was produced with the specific intention of avoiding copyright entanglements is the World English Bible. It is modernization of the American Standard Version (ASV) placed into the public domain. A paragraph from the site's FAQ is worth quoting: The copyright laws of most nations and the ...


21

In the United States, Copyright law has two basic categories - protected works and public domain. When a work has been around long enough (currently 95 years after the first publication or 70 years after the author's death) it enters the public domain, and is therefore allowed to be reproduced at will. According to the "Copyright Act", any work published ...


9

The length is the length of what you quote in a single document. So yes, a new sermon resets the counter. However, if you then publish all your sermons together in a single book, that single book becomes the reference document and can only contain 500 verses in toto (and of course, the rules on selling the text then come into play). The terms are quite ...


8

Of the non-public domain translations, the NET Bible has the most liberal licence for copying passages - you can read its licence. You can copy, but not alter or distribute commercially. If you wish to have complete freedom to act without legal restriction then you need a public domain translation. There are a number of translations which are out of ...


6

I have compiled a database of known public domain Bible translations. My compilation includes the following: Versions available: American Standard-ASV1901 (ASV) Bible in Basic English (BBE) Darby English Bible (DARBY) King James Version (KJV) Webster's Bible (WBT) World English Bible (WEB) Young's Literal Translation (YLT) This database is available ...


4

This issue is really just a sub-set of a much larger issue. See my answer on Are Christians bound to the laws of their country? for a defense of why Christians are bound to follow the laws of their countries whether or not they agree or disagree with them. Whether or not some of the items you list would or would not fall under a biblical definition of ...


4

Copyright laws are written to protect the author (or translator, artist, etc, but I'll stick to authors for my discussion). Without copyright laws, it would be easy for a very skillful author to write a wonderful book, but for some wealthy publisher to come along and take their book and publish it for their own profit. The author then goes un-recognized ...


4

It's a very good question, and not one which is easy to answer. But we are all called to make use of our talents, which I think may vary from gifts. Information is not necessarily subject to copyright - only literary / dramatic / musical works, films, broadcasts and sound recordings - basically, works where the author/creator has expended skill and effort to ...


3

It's an invalid legal argument and would fail if tested. Copyright subsists in the arrangement of the words themselves within the literary work. The licence to copy is separate from the literary work. Quite apart from copyright law, Dt 17:18 needs to read in context. 17 14 "When you come to the land which the LORD your God gives you, and you possess it ...


3

Ok, so far most answers are in terms of whether Christians/artists should work with copyrights. They give arguments like the musician, songwriter, etc. should get money in order to do what they do. But in all this, there is one important thing missing: motivation; what motivates the musician to write music - what motivated the people to write the Bible. If ...


3

So, I want to make two additional distinctions, the first is what establishment of copyright law means: Option 1: Literal establishment of copyright - An author can still agree with each and every of his sellers on limitations how they can distribute a book. Option 2: Forceful publication in public domain - It becomes illegal/impossible to limit ...


2

You should also look at the Open English Bible here: http://openenglishbible.org/ The Open English Bible project aims to create the first modern English translation of the Bible which is completely free of copyright restrictions and available without cost for any purpose. The OEB has no restrictions on what its readers and users can do with it (for both ...


2

Yes, it will. Quote away, without fear of being attacked for not footnoting what you are quoting. In the Wikipedia article on the KJV, you'll find the following: "The Authorized Version [i.e., the KJV] is in the public domain in most of the world." In your memoirs, just make sure your quotation corresponds to the correct chapter and verse. A personal ...


2

Note: I am not a lawyer. This is all uneducated opinion and reasoning. It's difficult to imagine that any of these companies would press charges (or even accuse you of wrongdoing) for simply using the Bible, since what you're doing is the very thing it was translated for. It seems like they're trying to protect their assets from being republished without ...


2

This is a legal issue and you should address it to the Bible translation editors for their legal department to consider. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't be surprised if they already have guidelines drawn up for this scenario and are ready to answer you if you ask them.


1

While I agree with all that you should ask a lawyer, my understanding is that it is first about distribution, long before it is about display. In order to have a program that displays a Bible translation, you must distribute the Bible translation with the program. Thus, simply distributing the content by way of a database is a violation, technically, even ...


1

The Following is a list of Public Domain bibles I tend to use. Septuagint in American English 2012 World English Bible Twentieth Century New Testament Open English Bible [an update of the 20cNT] The Updated King James Version The American Standard Version The Work of God's Children Illustrated Bible (based on Challoner Revision of the Douay–Rheims ...


1

Cambridge University holds the copyright to the King James version (through a centuries-long series of transfers of ownership rights), but only in the United Kingdom. I think the King James version can be freely quoted in books published in the U.S. and other countries. Source: http://www.cambridge.org/about-us/who-we-are/queens-printers-patent Also see ...


1

Copyright is ultimately a protection over ownership. Those who choose to copyright their work are saying "I want ownership over my work, I don't want anyone else to take credit for what I do". But as Christians, we are held to a higher standard (Acts 2:44). What does taking credit of our work show? I think we need to examine our hearts here. Ultimately, ...


1

The Bible mentions nothing about copyright because it didn't yet exist. At a time when most people were illiterate, the concept of protecting ideas was absurd. That means to answer this question we have to find verses and try to make them apply, which gets dangerous. I will make my case for my beliefs, but to say "the Bible supports copyrights" or "the Bible ...


1

Rightly or wrongly, copyright is something that someone owns. To breach that copyright is essentially to steal from them, and I'm sure you know what the Bible has to say about stealing. In terms of something more specific about copyright itself, you could look at passages like Romans 12:4-8 and 1 Corinthians 12:1-31. Copyright is usually applied to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible