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44

C. S. Lewis wrote in Christian Reunion: The real reason, I take it, why you cannot be in communion with us is not your disagreement with this or that particular Protestant doctrine, so much as the absence of any real "Doctrine", in your sense of the word, at all. It is, you feel, like asking a man to say he agrees not with a speaker but with a debating ...


15

This answer presupposes that the claims of Christianity are true. Since Christians believe this, and this site is meant to give a "Christian" view of things, that's the presupposition required to properly answer this. I realize that many people don't believe the claims of Christianity, but the Truth of the claims isn't what's being asked or what's relevant ...


15

You basically have three sub-questions here, so let me attempt to answer them in order. Why do christians have to promote their beliefs to other people? For two principal reasons: because we were commanded to at several different places in the Bible, and as an act of love. The Gospel improves the lives of those who live its principles, and we want to ...


12

The term "born again" comes from a passage in John 3: Now there was a Pharisee, a man named Nicodemus who was a member of the Jewish ruling council. He came to Jesus at night and said, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher who has come from God. For no one could perform the signs you are doing if God were not with him.” Jesus replied, “Very truly I ...


12

There is no consensus among Christians on this question. Assuming that the conversion is genuine and permanent, rather than momentary weakness, the three main schools of thought that apply to this issue are: Conditional Security According to this view, Christians can lose their salvation. Thus, a Christian who converted to another religion would be seen ...


11

Although I presume this question will be closed, I'll answer anyway. A Christian who converts to any other religion, whether Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, etc., is considered a heretic and anathema. With respect to Muslims: while they confess Yeshu'a to be the Messiah (e.g., Sūratu Āli ʿImrān, āyah 45), they deny his 1) crucifixion, 2) atonement, 3) death, and ...


10

Chesterton probably wrote more than anyone ever so I'm sure he can tell you in his own words why he converted from Atheism to Anglicanism and from Anglicanism to Catholicism. See: Catholic Church and Conversion and Why I am A Catholic and The God With the Golden Key As an avid reader of Chesterton, I'm often perplexed at how much love he gives to ...


8

I don't think it's important for a Christian to know the exact date/time when they became a Christian, but it is important to know how they became a Christian. Individual testimonies can be incredibly powerful, and often being able to tell the story of how one came to faith does involve knowing where and when it happened. Certainly it's not vital for ...


8

I like an analogy that Hank Hanegraaff uses to address this question: Imagine you're driving from Las Vegas, Nevada to Los Angeles, California, when you look up and see a sign that says "Los Angeles, 50 miles". Is it important that you remember the moment you crossed the Nevada/California state line? Or is it important that you know where you are now? ...


7

You must confess all mortal sins that you're aware of and any venial sins you feel compelled to confess. You are not absolved of any mortal sins you withhold, and intentionally withholding mortal sins not only invalidates the whole confession, but is a mortal sin itself. (catholic.com) And, if left in a state of mortal sin, you're expected not to receiving ...


7

It's because of The Great Commission given by Jesus Christ. Matthew 28:19-20 (NIV) 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” It's the ...


7

Short answer: It would appear that the answer to your question that is reliable, and applicable across the board, is a resounding "no". Within denominational or individual Church/affiliation boundaries, there are plenty, but the numbers vary Explanation of the short answer: I've found several sources that give "fall away rates" with varying degrees of ...


6

I would argue that the moment of conversion is less important than has been stressed as of late. American Christianity is currently very worked up over the sentimentality of the conversion moment, and that is partly due to the tent revivals of the 1st and 2 Great Awakenings, Charles Darby, and Charles Finney (Darby and Finney, however, have had their ...


6

Approaches First of all, some people may evangelize in ways that would be considered "aggressive", but many others are not. In fact, the situation often determines the appropriate approach, so the same person could approach the same person in completely different ways, depending on the situation. When my mother saw me as a child wandering close to the ...


5

Here is a evangelical view from the Protestant tradition. The concept of 'birth' means something that happens to you, not as a result of your own work, effort or commitment. The doctrine of new birth pertains to the new life one has the moment they believe the gospel.  The necessity for new birth shows that the old life from Adam can't be improved. It must ...


5

It is the Engel Scale. Originally it went from -8 "Awareness of supreme being, no knowledge of Gospel" to +5 "Stewardship" but now it is often shown as going from -10 to +10 (see eg Bill Hybel's Just Walk Across The Room). A quick Google search will reveal multiple variations, see eg this YWAM variant:


5

Christians go to missions inspired and commanded by the book of Matthew. Precisely: And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I ...


4

Let me put it to you this way: If you saw someone about to walk off a cliff, wouldn't you try to stop them? The question is asking about a Christian's motives, so it's fair to evaluate this from the Christian's point of view. Perhaps the atheist about to walk off the cliff is only trying to reach a ledge just below top of the cliff, but if all the ...


4

A better question is, why wouldn't we? We have the truth, and the truth is that you may have eternal life by believing in Jesus Christ. Pardon me if I say so myself, and I think I speak for all Christians when I say this, but eternal life is not a bad thing. In fact, if we didn't want to convert anyone, if we just kept to ourselves, it either means 1) we ...


3

As Chesterton himself has said, The difficulty of explaining “why I am a Catholic” is that there are ten thousand reasons all amounting to one reason: that Catholicism is true. I could fill all my space with separate sentences each beginning with the words, “It is the only thing that…” As, for instance, (1) It is the only thing that really ...


2

The question of conversion in Christianity as a whole is very different than when you just look at western evangelicals. For someone raised entirely in a christian family and in a church they stay with their entire lives, there may never be a "conversion" since there may never have been a time when they weren't christian. Most evangelical churches ...


2

In his book "Mere Christianity" he indicates that Christianity is one step in a sort of religious evolutionary system. In his mind the thing after Christianity won't be constrained by religious divisions or Dogmas. This is one obvious reason he wasn't interested in becoming Catholic. The evolution is approximately: Paganism->Christianity->Something ...


2

The Apostle John addresses this issue in his first epistle: They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us. But they went out, that it might become plain that they all are not of us. 1 John 2:19 ESV This teaches that those who leave [Christianity] were never really Christians.


2

What is described in this link does seem to me to be a model for becoming a Christian but a means of describing where someone is on the spectrum of belief/faith. In particular, this document seems to employ the scale as a means of comparing some beliefs of different Christian groups. I don't think a model such as you're describing exists. To use a ...


2

From 2000-2008: Over these nine years, the Catholic presence in the world has grown from 1.045 billion in 2000 to 1.166 billion in 2008, an increase of 11.54%. Considering the statistics in detail, numbers in Africa grew by 33%, in Europe they remained generally stable (an increase of 1.17%), while in Asia they increased by 15.61%, in Oceania by 11.39% ...


1

The aim of Christian missionaries is to present the good news about Jesus Christ, for: there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved. - Acts 4:12 ESV As well as preaching this good news, they are mandated with the task of making disciples of those who respond to this message with ...


1

I liked David's answer and +1'd it. He talks about one working motive and he is absolutely right in that regard - because a Christian cares about the one they are witnessing to - that's the answer in the Penn Jillette perspective basically. I don't necessarily see a problem with those answers, and when I share with someone, it is out of a motive of love for ...


1

Wikipedia has an article on people who have converted to Anglicanism and a category for Catholic-Anglican conversions. Ones specifically listed as converting to Anglicanism from Catholicism as adults include: Madeleine Albright Matthew Fox Alberto Cutie Dinesh D'Souza said he converted from Catholicism to his wife's tradition in a Christian's vs. ...


1

Just thought I'd muddy the waters by bringing to light something referencing being born again that is at least as old as the reformation. Grant, we beseech Thee, O almighty God, that the splendor of Thy brightness may shine forth upon us, and the light of Thy light may, by the illumination of the Holy Ghost, confirm the hearts of those who have been born ...



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