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15

In essence, care should be taken lest the Sacrament of Confession be confused with psychological counseling. A priest with a degree in psychology should be sure not to confuse the spiritual purpose of the Sacrament with the therapeutic purpose of psychology. Therefore, the proper procedure would be for the priest to instruct the penitent to bring up his ...


7

Prior to Christ, a priest was needed to help make sacrifice to receive forgiveness: Thus shall he do with the bull. As he did with the bull of the sin offering, so shall he do with this. And the priest shall make atonement for them, and they shall be forgiven. - Leviticus 4:20 ESV The reason that Protestants don't consider confession a sacrament ...


7

A baptized Catholic would understand "accepting Jesus" as meaning professing the (Catholic) Faith; he would interpret "repenting of one's sins" as receiving absolution from a priest in the sacrament of penance, and thus being in a state of grace (the state of not having the stain of mortal sin on his soul). If he were to die in a state of grace, he would ...


6

As far as why individual Catholics participate in the various liturgies and sacraments, there can be all sorts of reasons, from the highly religious to the merely social or cultural. The Church does have teachings on the subject, though; let's look at those. As far as going to Mass on Sundays (and some other days): This is a requirement for Catholics. In ...


4

All of these answers respond to your question well, using scripture. But because there is no reference to Protestantism in the NT, and because Catholics would take something different from scripture, I'd like to include the history of where the change took place between the Catholic church seeing seven sacraments (including confession) and Protestants not ...


4

The Catholic Church requires that one go to confession for any mortal (serious) sin one has committed after baptism. If the one entering the Church has never been baptized, there is no need to go to confession since the sacrament of baptism cleans the soul of all sin, regardless of its gravity. One could still do so in order to be more at peace with oneself. ...


4

Actually Catholics would have to assent to the statement that "once saved, [one is] always saved" (I'll refer to this belief as "OSAS" for short). The difference is in when Catholics believe one is saved. The Evangelical Protestants whom you refer to generally seem to believe that one is saved once one deliberately turns to God and accepts Jesus as Lord and ...


4

In the sacrament of penance the faithful who confess their sins to a legitimate minister, are sorry for them, and intend to reform themselves obtain from God through the absolution imparted by the same minister forgiveness for the sins they have committed after baptism and, at the same, time are reconciled with the Church which they have wounded by sinning. ...


3

Yes, a non Catholic can confess to a Catholic priest. (The canon law point has already been addressed). What the non Catholic is not generally eligible for is the full sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation.; thus the priest cannot grant you absolution.1 Our priest makes that clear to folks who are married to Catholics but who aren't of that ...


1

For protestants generally, one of the essential, non-negotiable requirements for a sacrament is an explicit command from Jesus. In the case of Baptism, this command is reported in Matthew 28:19 Go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them... and in the case of Holy Communion, it is reported in Matthew 26:26—29, Mark 14:22—25; and Luke 22:17—19; ...


1

The Catechism of the Council of Trent gives these reasons: Necessity Of Confession Contrition, it is true, blots out sin; but who does not know that to effect this it must be so intense, so ardent, so vehement, as to bear a proportion to the magnitude of the crimes which it effaces? This is a degree of contrition which few reach; and hence, in ...


1

John 20:19-23 (NAB) Jesus sends his disciples (making them apostles) breathes on them, says receive the Holy Spirit then says who's sins you forgive are forgiven and who's sins you retain are retained. The question then is, how would the apostle know which sins to forgive and which ones to retain? Unless the repentant sinner told the Apostle which sins ...


1

No. What is said during the Sacrament of Penance, must be secret and it's inviolable. The Seal of Confession must not be violated, no matter how serious is the fault, not even if it could save another life. The priest cannot disclose anything that is said during a Penance, directly or indirectly. To make an extreme example, if a man, during the Penance, ...



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