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6

A baptized Catholic would understand "accepting Jesus" as meaning professing the (Catholic) Faith; he would interpret "repenting of one's sins" as receiving absolution from a priest in the sacrament of penance, and thus being in a state of grace (the state of not having the stain of mortal sin on his soul). If he were to die in a state of grace, he would ...


6

There are indeed some sins which cause excommunication simply by being committed. Such excommunications are called latae sententiae excommunications (in Latin, more or less, "[excommunications] of a hidden sentence"). Acts which can incur such an excommunication include: a physical assault against a bishop or the Pope; procurement of an abortion; ...


5

As far as why individual Catholics participate in the various liturgies and sacraments, there can be all sorts of reasons, from the highly religious to the merely social or cultural. The Church does have teachings on the subject, though; let's look at those. As far as going to Mass on Sundays (and some other days): This is a requirement for Catholics. In ...


4

I'm going to disagree slightly with Andrew Leach on this one. As far as excommunication: since you obviously weren't a member of the Church at the time, excommunication is obviously impossible. The information Andrew gives on excommunication for abortion is valuable, though; you should certainly be aware of just how seriously the Church takes this action. ...


4

In the sacrament of penance the faithful who confess their sins to a legitimate minister, are sorry for them, and intend to reform themselves obtain from God through the absolution imparted by the same minister forgiveness for the sins they have committed after baptism and, at the same, time are reconciled with the Church which they have wounded by ...


3

Actually Catholics would have to assent to the statement that "once saved, [one is] always saved" (I'll refer to this belief as "OSAS" for short). The difference is in when Catholics believe one is saved. The Evangelical Protestants whom you refer to generally seem to believe that one is saved once one deliberately turns to God and accepts Jesus as Lord and ...


3

"Seeking moral advice" is not a confession, and so would not be subject to the strict seal of the confessional. However, if there is no need for the priest to divulge anything, then I would certainly expect something said in confidence to be kept confidential. To give a concrete example: If moral advice was sought as part of a sacramental confession, then ...


3

This would depend upon a couple of things: 1) Which faith tradition are you speaking within? If you are within the Catholic (Roman and Eastern Branches), Orthodox, or Anglican Churches, then you need to confess this sin within the sacramental forum provided by your faith. If you aren't within the Catholic Church, but are within the Orthodox or Anglican ...


2

It is a sin of the gravest seriousness, and results in excommunication by virtue of committing the act (this is what latae sententiae means: one does not have to be declared excommunicated; procuring an abortion procures excommunication). It must be confessed. As the excommunication is not reserved to the Apostolic See, any priest with the faculty to remit ...


1

The reason you don't see "penance" in the Bible is because of a difference in translation: Matthew 3:2 in the English Standard Version, popular among protestants, says: "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." Matthew 3:2 in the Douay-Rheims, an English translation of the Latin Vulgate and primarily used by Catholics, says: "Do penance: for the ...


1

While having a sinful desire is not a sin by itself, to willingly dwell in such desires, however — by means of imagination, which amounts to actively listen to the Devil — is a sin. For instance, if you see an object of desire, and immediately are tempted to sin, there is no sin in this: but if you then indulge in imagining the sinful act, then it is a sin, ...


1

"Ideations" in the question "Can having 'ideations' to sin ever be mortally sinful?" could mean "passions of the soul," which are causes of sin. Now, can a sin committed through passion ever be mortal? St. Thomas Aquinas explains (Summa Theologica I-II q. 77 a. 8 c.): Mortal sin, as stated above (q. 72, a. 5), consists in turning away from our last end ...


1

I'll try to answer this from a Catholic perspective. In the situation you described, even if A confesses his sin to a priest, he's still two steps short of being forgiven. Both steps involve the fact that supernatural contrition for one's sins is a necessary part of the sacrament of penance (or, in modernist language, the sacrament of reconciliation). ...


1

Actually you got it wrong as alot do... No it is not confess to a priest and you're done... You dont even need a priest to do it..! It is something I believe is totally wrong that got spread widely through the last centuries..! You could just pray for god and ask him for mercy and forgivness but you really have to mean it...! Also not to make the same sin ...


1

John 20:19-23 (NAB) Jesus sends his disciples (making them apostles) breathes on them, says receive the Holy Spirit then says who's sins you forgive are forgiven and who's sins you retain are retained. The question then is, how would the apostle know which sins to forgive and which ones to retain? Unless the repentant sinner told the Apostle which sins ...


1

No. What is said during the Sacrament of Penance, must be secret and it's inviolable. The Seal of Confession must not be violated, no matter how serious is the fault, not even if it could save another life. The priest cannot disclose anything that is said during a Penance, directly or indirectly. To make an extreme example, if a man, during the Penance, ...



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