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14

Sacred tradition in Catholicism makes the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation the pathway by which life in Christ is possible. In the United States at least, before receiving first communion, children must first go to reconciliation. All Catholics who are conscious of mortal sin, must confess their sins before receiving communion. In fact, the only ...


12

Perhaps surprisingly, Canon Law appears to allow it. Can. 959 In the sacrament of penance the faithful who confess their sins to a legitimate minister, are sorry for them, and intend to reform themselves obtain from God through the absolution imparted by the same minister forgiveness for the sins they have committed after baptism and, at the same, time ...


8

Confession is actually required of all Christians. As 1 John 1 states: If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness. If we claim we have not sinned, we make him out to be a liar and his word has no place ...


7

Within the Confessional Canon Law specifically and absolutely forbids the priest from divulging anything sacramentally confessed (Can 983). That said, and notwithstanding Canon 980, it would be possible for a priest to withhold absolution from a penitent until she has reported any crime to the authorities herself. The priest may legitimately have doubts ...


7

Catechumens do not go to confession before reception into the Catholic Church, you were thinking of "candidates for reception" as outlined in Chapter 5 of the RCIA. Candidates for reception are baptized Christians who express their wish to make a full profession of faith and be received fully into the Catholic Church. As for their confession, If the ...


7

Any priest, or any level of priest, can hear confession from anyone. A priest will go to another priest for confession. Similarly, bishops, cardinals, and the pope can (and do) go to priests for confession. Apparently priests and the pope often have a specific confessor and are encouraged to visit him with "some regularity." As for whether a priest can ...


7

The Catholic Church teaches that man's sins may be absolved by the Church. Absolution from sin means "To free from sin", which is pretty much the same as forgiveness of sins. In lay-person's terms, as I understand it, the Priest is acting under the authority and power of the Church, which, in turn, is acting under the authority and power of Christ. This ...


7

You must confess all mortal sins that you're aware of and any venial sins you feel compelled to confess. You are not absolved of any mortal sins you withhold, and intentionally withholding mortal sins not only invalidates the whole confession, but is a mortal sin itself. (catholic.com) And, if left in a state of mortal sin, you're expected not to receiving ...


6

How do practicing Catholics keep track of all the sins they commit before going to Confession? They don't keep track of sins. Before going to confession they do something called examination of conscience. This is in layman term trying to recall all the sin one has committed. An examination of conscience is a “prayerful self-reflection on our words and ...


6

The short answer is yes. Additionally, every priest and bishop, including the pope, is supposed to have a spiritual advisor. The priest they see for confession need not be any special priest, as far as I know. It just needs to be a priest. Confession is not a matter of hierarchical authority. It's just a matter of receiving absolution from "the Church."


6

Jesus also said: “Behold, I am sending you out as sheep in the midst of wolves, so be wise as serpents and innocent as doves. (Matthew 10:16) and Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces. (Matthew 7:6) Wisdom would suggest that one choose ...


5

As believers in the priesthood of all believers, it is not that Baptists (and many other Protestants) reject confession per se- it's that we reject the idea that said confession must be mediated through the local priest. Ideally, we should be confessing our sins in a "small group" type setting if we are being faithful to what Luther, Calvin, et. Al ...


5

What is confession? St. John wrote: If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us (1 John 1:8-10, ESV). The verb used for ...


5

The Protestant Reformation is based on, among other things, "sola scriptura"--that the Bible alone is the basis for all doctrine and practice. There are probably two essential points in this matter. The Priesthood of All Believers First, a common doctrine of Protestants is the priesthood of all believers. It is believed that there is no biblical ...


5

James 5:16 (which you quoted) is pretty clear that we confess our sins to the righteous, honorable ones in the church in order to be prayed for regarding those issues. These people know what it means to sin and be shamed by it, so they will treat the confession with respect and discreetness. They themselves have struggled with sin and know its power; they ...


4

You know you're in confession if: you started your conversation saying bless me father for I have sinned. the priest dons his purple stole you can't see the priest you're talking to you stood in line to talk to a priest you were given absolution for your sins you end your conversation by making an act of contrition. you don't go in to details, but ...


4

Grace is the forgiving of sin: Mark 2:5 When Jesus saw their faith, he said unto the sick of the palsy, Son, thy sins be forgiven thee. God’s grace is a gift: Ephesians 2:8 For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: “Faith” enables “grace”: Romans 4:16 …it is of faith, that it might be by ...


4

From a Calvinist perspective, any teaching which makes God contingent on man in any way negates the supremacy of God. Put another way, who is man to say anything to God? Any choice which man makes for God is the result of an election that occurred ante praevisa merita, and is thus a decision man made long before any person "decided" he or she wanted ...


4

Since the Catholic perspective has not yet been stated, and since the OP professed to be a member of a Church which is allied with Rome, it might be a good idea to state the RCC position here: Mortal sins are sins which cut off your relationship with God. Venial sins are all of the other sins. A person who dies with venial sins on his soul will go to ...


4

For ordinary sins, the priest is supposed to deny absolution if there's no sign of contrition (see 1451-1454 here), especially when the sins are grave (mortal). In case of excommunication, some can be lifted by any priest, some by an Ordinary (usually a bishop) or a priest appointed by an Ordinary, and some only by the pope or some priest appointed by him. ...


3

We have a biblical warrant to be thinking in the mindset of confession for the forgiveness of sins. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his ...


3

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has this to say on satisfaction: 1459 Many sins wrong our neighbor. One must do what is possible in order to repair the harm (e.g., return stolen goods, restore the reputation of someone slandered, pay compensation for injuries). Simple justice requires as much. But sin also injures and weakens the sinner himself, as ...


3

99% of the time that seems to be the case, even for mortal sins. I've had a few "take your wife on a dates" but the most prayers I've ever been assigned was a Rosary. Generally it's just a few Hail Mary's. I think there's a recent historical precedent for this practice, but I don't know off hand what it is, hopefully someone can expand on that. I've ...


3

The short answer is, "Yes, he can." At a minimum, the confession of those of us came into the Church, already having been baptized, it is necessary and necessarily efficacious. My RCIA director (a cannon lawyer) basically explained that for all practical purposes, a priest has the authority to allow confession and communion to anyone, so long as it is ...


3

I think the most direct Bible verse on this subject is: 1 Tim 2:5 "For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men, the Man Christ Jesus" Christians do not need any mediator besides Jesus. Specifically, we do not need a priest to stand between us and Jesus. Jesus is the mediator. We don't need a mediator to speak to the mediator. 1 ...


3

If a priest violates the seal of confession, he is automatically excommunicated, period. Even if someone confesses to being a rapist, serial killer that enjoys hitting kittens with a baseball bat, the priest violates the seal of confession, that priest is still excommunicated. There are norms for the reporting of child abuse (and often if a child is ...


2

Originally Luther believed that confession to a priest was a holy sacrament. After being what he called 'born again', which is often referred to as his Tower Experience, he began to see confession and penance differently.  Early in the reformation he still maintained that it was still a sacrament, along with Baptism and the Lord's Supper, but the priests ...


2

Andrew's got the canon law side of things down, but I think a majority of non-Catholic confessions are said by those coming in to the Catholic Church according to the norms of the rite of Christian initiation for adults chapter 5 concerning the reception of baptized Christians (also done for Children in a separate chapter). Any baptized Christian willing ...


2

1Jn 1:9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. Mat 18:21 Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times? Mat 18:22 Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, Until seven times: but, Until seventy ...


2

First and foremost, nobody - neither Catholic nor Protestant - believes that a priest "forgives" sins. At best, they act as an intermediary, supplicating to Jesus, who alone forgives sin. As the Cathecism of the Catholic church states: Only God forgives sins. The priest is the sign and the instrument of God's merciful love for the sinner. The ...



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