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52

Many religions are attempts to please a god or "gods" in order to gain their favor. Many religions focus on becoming more like a god ourselves, elevating man in some way or another Others deny God or the Supernatural at all (often viewing man as already being the ultimate being) Many focus on using or harnessing powers of the universe to improve our lives (...


38

To our Muslim friends, please do not be offended: Christianity has no official view on Mohammed or the Quran, nor could it because Mohammed and the Quran came about hundreds of years after Christianity. Christians do have opinions though. To most Christians, Mohammad is no different than any other non-christian who started a religion. They are false ...


36

Christianity is unique in being the only religion in the history of the world to turn the tables on man (in every sense). It stands apart in its claim to reconcile a perfectly just God as being both just and the justifier of unjust men. Christianity stands alone in being the only religion whose God gave up his rights –and very life– on behalf of his ...


22

I will post later using this information here, but for now, I have copied the image supplied by Jayarathina Madharasan It seems that there are actually not as many similarities as certain people on the internet would like you to believe.


12

No. Jesus said "I am the way, the truth, and the light. No one comes to the Father but by me." It's an exclusive statement. As is "Thou shalt have no other gods before me" and "Thou shalt not make any graven image" (which I take to mean a "god" we create with our hands or with our imagination.) The entire history of the Jewish people, as recorded in ...


12

Your source has more than a few issues; I'm not going to worry about the specific details raised (many of which are answered with a simple "false") but paint in broad strokes to attempt to answer the question behind the question. Many similarities between Jesus and other gods are superficial, and others may have actually borrowed from the life of Jesus. The ...


11

First question to ask is what are Christians being saved from or for? Thankfully someone has saved me time from having to write that answer up (Thanks @Caleb): What does it mean to "be saved" Again, I would promote the necessity of relationship with God so that a follower knows the nature of God well enough to know what His desire for us. This is ...


11

The rule is "no", but like every rule there are exceptions. So "yes". It should be stressed that such views are not mainstream, majority or orthodox in any way. However there are groups that claim to be Christian and hold to a metaphorical view of Christ's resurrection. Likewise, there are groups who claim to be Christian but don't even believe that Christ ...


11

In the terms you describe, most - if not all - forms of Christianity are Monotheistic in nature. That said, there are three key concepts (that again most forms of Christianity subscribe to) that are somewhat comparable to 'Shivoham' as you've described it: God's Immanence, the Indwelling of the Holy Spirit in a believer, the Glorification of believers. ...


10

Occam's Razor states that the simplest solution is likely to be the correct one, and such commonalities are generally explained by Christians by appealing to the simplest solution: when two separate entities share several common traits, it's generally because they derive from a shared origin. The Old Testament gives a few tantalizing glimpses of things that ...


10

One could do a great deal worse than quote another answer: There are several heresies that one needs to be careful of when discussing a topic such as this. For example, Modalism which declares that God is not three distinct persons, but that He merely reveals himself in three different forms. Or, Arianism which declares that Christ and the Holy Spirit ...


9

You're obviously familiar with the Messianic prophecies which are well expounded in Wikipedia. The classic proof text for Christians' being saved is John 14:6 (and 10:27 below) — Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” And for Jesus-as-God, there's John 10:27–30 (...


9

The answer to your question lies in what each religion teaches about who God is. Islam From The Truth About Islam by Dr. David R. Reagan*: God — The Koran asserts that the god of Islam is the God of Christians and Jews (Sura 29:46). Nothing could be farther from the truth.7 The god of Islam, Allah, is most definitely not the God of the Bible. ...


8

Objection 1: It would seem that there is no distinction between actual grace and karma. For both are external causes of a person's future behavior. Therefore there is no distinction between them. Objection 2: Furthermore, karma and actual graces both influence the state of an individual after death. For karma, we are told, can influence how an individual is ...


7

Per your own quoted dictionary, no. By definition they are incompatible. Pegan: ... observing a polytheistic religion ... who is not a Christian ... irreligious. (dictionary.com definitions #1, #2 and #3) Per the every major creed in Christian history, no. The whole purpose of these creedal statements was to show how Christianity's beliefs are set ...


7

This is a question that requires a long quote to be read, in context, from Chesterton's Orthodoxy, you really should read the entire book, but you may be able to pick up a few chestnuts here or there from this excerpt: The things said most confidently by advanced persons to crowded audiences are generally those quite opposite to the fact; it is actually ...


7

To quote from Bible itself, Jesus mentioned about the salvation of mankind through Him, in following verses in Bible. All these words spoken by Jesus Himself: John 3:14-18 Just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, so that everyone who believes in him may have eternal life.”For this is the way God loved ...


7

It might be nice to believe that anyone who suffers must deserve it because of some evil thing he did, that everyone always gets exactly what he deserves, good or bad. But Christianity does not teach that. As Asfallows and Thomas point out, in John 9 Jesus was specifically asked if a particular case of suffering was punishment for a person's sin, and he ...


7

Dismissing other religions is a bit harsh, I believe. First, there are common beliefs, which makes sense if there was an event that actually happened, for example, if you look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_Eden and read about Sumer you will see that there is another story with parallels to the Garden of Eden. If you look at http://www....


7

Trimurti and Trinity similarity: The number "Three" Trimurti and Trinity differences: Trinity is Father, Son and Holy Spirit while Trimurti is Creator, Preserver and Destroyer. Trinity is "Three persons in one God". Trimurti is "Three distinct gods" 1 John 5:7 (NKJV) For there are three that bear witness in heaven: the Father, the Word, and the ...


7

Jesus is Risen All of Christianity rests on the resurrection of Jesus from the dead. If He is indeed risen, then He is indeed the Christ, the Son of God. From this, it follows that the Christian God is, in fact, the true God. Paul affirmed this in his opening statement to the Romans: Paul, a bond-servant of Christ Jesus, called as an apostle, set ...


6

According to the Bible, God was in the beginning and was the only God worshiped as such. He revealed Himself to Adam and Noah specifically. At Babel, the people of the earth were divided by language, yet all of them retained some history and understanding of God's interactions with mankind in the world that is recorded in Genesis 1-11. From this, we ...


6

Al-Hallaj was a sufi mystic from ~900 years after the time of Jesus. He was enamored of the Jesus he knew of, but his own sources and influence were primarily Islamic and his idea of who Jesus was matches the non-divine prophet of Islamic teaching rather that the divine savior of Christianity. He tried to live after the pattern of the stories he had and used ...


6

The article states that Christianity itself, particularly as it originally existed in the days of the early Church, meets the definition of a mystery religion, and that this was noted and remarked upon by one of the great early apologists, Justin Martyr. And if the definition is that "participation is reserved to initiates," then Judaism meets the ...


5

The study of religious doctrines of salvation is called soteriology (the Wikipedia article is a good start). The most important part of soteriology is the theologic concept of justification. Justification is God's cleansing of our sins and declaring us righteous. Catholics and Orthodoxs believe in justification by baptism (initial justification) avoiding ...


5

You can take compatible in a number of directions and the answers, accordingly, varies: A. Compatible meaning theologically interchangeable - answer is no, clearly. B. Compatible means holding similar doctrines - answer is no. C. Compatible means holding similar values - answer is USUALLY yes. Just look at the values espoused in Buddhism and Hinduism, ...


5

So, if I understand you correctly, your question could be alternately summarized as "Does the Bible offer explanations for why certain things happen to certain people?", which is related to (but different from) the age-old question "Why does God let bad things happen to good people?" To my knowledge, there isn't much (if any) canon scripture that directly ...


4

Christianity is the only religion that is not a religion. It is an encounter with the Person of Jesus Christ. Being Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction. Deus Caritas Est



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