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Although you are directing your question specifically towards Roman Catholics, I would point out that Eastern Orthodox also believe in transubstantiation as you define it, although different terms are sometimes used. So I will also comment on your question from an Eastern Orthodox perspective (to the best of my ability, God being my helper). In answer to ...


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I think the simplest explanation is simply that the Evangelists had slightly different recollections of events. The Church Fathers recognized that there were inconsistencies in the Gospel accounts and accepted them. John Chrysostom discussed this the first of his Homilies on the Gospel According to Matthew, written in the late 4th century: And why can ...


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The ubiquity doctrine is problematic to Catholics in that it does not acknowledge a "real" (substantial) change. Second, Lutherans reject Rome's identification of the bread and wine as the corporal body and blood of the Lord. At the Lord's Table, the bread remains bread; the wine remains wine. Luther, however, argued that there was a communication of ...


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From what you've quoted of Ott, it sounds like this "Ubiquity* Doctrine" holds that Christ's human nature is His divine nature. This is the heresy of monophysitism,** which says that Christ only has one nature, not both human and divine natures. *(ubi- = Latin for "where" or "in what place")**(mono- = one; phys- = nature) It is not necessary, for ...


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There is no reason preventing more chalices form being consacrated, but usually catholics uses olny one cup mainly for pratical reasons: since there is no need for each faithful to receive the Blood, in most cases only the priest drinks it, so one cup is enough. Even when there are more priests, each one takes only a little sip from the same cup (possibily ...


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The official website of the Vatican seems to be silent on this issue. Nevertheless it may be up to the local ordinary to make special norms for the diocese in question! The following is taken from Redemptionis Sacramentum of the Vatican: [160.] Let the diocesan Bishop give renewed consideration to the practice in recent years regarding this matter, and ...


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Lay "Eucharistic Ministers" are a post-Vatican II novelty, as is Communion in the hand. The actual norms only permit them in cases of grave necessity (e.g., in regions where there is no priest). See, e.g., The Eucharistic Storms: Communion in the hand and marginalizing the Real Presence by Barry Forbes.


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The "Communion of Saints", (stated in the Apostles Creed), in reading the passages in 1 Corinthians 12, seems to mean the sharing of those spiritual gifts afforded us from the Holy Spirit to strengthen and complete the body of believers who make up the church. Although God could create one individual who might possess all the spiritual gifts, our Father, ...


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Transubstantiation is adhering to these three mysteries (or miracles), described in the Catechism of the Council of Trent: The Real Presence:that the true body of Christ the Lord, the same that was born of the Virgin, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father in heaven, is contained in this Sacrament. Transubstantion itself:that, however repugnant ...



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