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Wikipedia explains the Quartodeciman controversy thus: The Quartodeciman controversy arose because Christians in the churches of Jerusalem and Asia Minor celebrated Passover on the 14th of the first month (Aviv), while the churches in and around Rome changed to the practice of celebrating Easter on the following Sunday. The difference was turned ...


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The earliest indication may be in the Didache, typically dated at the end of the first century. It describes the celebration of the Lord's Supper in terms of the cup and breaking bread, and then says: But every Lord's day gather yourselves together, and break bread, and give thanksgiving after having confessed your transgressions, that your sacrifice ...


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In fact as one comment states Jehovah's Witnesses observe the event just once a year. In the January 1 2003 issues of the Watchtower magazine on page 31 a similar question was posed by a reader. The answer provides evidence that early on the apostles did conclude that once a year was appropriate. In fact it states that only later in the second century did ...


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I think that the answer lies in how the Church understood the nature of the Eucharist. Whereas Passover was essentially a commemoration of an event of the Exodus, the Eucharist is something entirely different. According to the account in Exodus (12:14), Passover was instituted strictly as a memorial. Christ Himself described the nature - and necessity - of ...


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Firstly, who are the Quartodecimans? The Quartodecimans are followers of the Early Church who kept Easter on the fourteenth day of the moon of Nisan, whatever day of the week that might be, following therein the tradition which was claimed to have derived from St. John the Apostle. Irenaeus states that St. Polycarp, who like the other Asiatics, kept ...


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No, "they" celebrated the Eucharist throughout the year. I am not sure what your source material is, but perhaps there is some confusion about the term "Passover" in a Christian context. "Easter" has always been referred to using the Hebrew word for Passover - "Pascha" - in the Christian east and continues to be referred to as such to this day in the ...


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Although you are directing your question specifically towards Roman Catholics, I would point out that Eastern Orthodox also believe in transubstantiation as you define it, although different terms are sometimes used. So I will also comment on your question from an Eastern Orthodox perspective (to the best of my ability, God being my helper). In answer to ...



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