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Lutherans do not generally use the term consubstantiation. Nor do they use the term impanation. Impanation, by analogy to the Incarnation, would imply some kind of hypostatic union between the bread and Christ (just as between the human and divine natures in Christ), which is explicitly rejected by the Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord (6.38). The ...


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This is a bad question because there is too much diversity of belief to say that there is a single "Protestant" view of sacraments. Some Protestants, notably the Salvation Army, do not even practice sacraments. On the other hand, there are some Protestants, especially in certain corners of Anglicanism who have essentially the same beliefs as Catholics. ...


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What did Jesus mean when He said we must “eat His flesh and drink His blood”? John 6:53-54 (NASB) 53 So Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in yourselves. 54 He who eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life...55 For My flesh is true food, and ...


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The Purpose of the sacrmanents in the Protestant view -- I would specifically answer from a Born Again Christian view point. First of all, Born Again Christians do not believe that the sacraments --the Eucharist and Water Baptism -- have graces that saves/cleanses/justifies someone from any sin. The Lord's Table Born Again Christians believe that the ...


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Yes. The Eastern Orthodox Church uses leavened bread. Leavened bread has always been used in the Eastern Church. In fact, at one point in time, a great controversy raged over the fact that in the Eastern Church leavened bread was used, while in the Christian West unleavened bread was the norm. (Orthodox Church in America) The Orthodox Church ...


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RCIA candidates who receive the sacraments of Baptism and First Eucharist at the Easter Vigil Mass also receive Confirmation at that time: Today in all the rites, Latin and Eastern, the Christian initiation of adults begins with their entry into the catechumenate and reaches its culmination in a single celebration of the three sacraments of initiation: ...


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I have been a Southern Baptist for over sixty years, and have never heard of any set procedure; for administration of Communion. In all of the Churches I have attended the juice and wafer are distributed by the ushers and after distribution usually the Preacher offers a prayer; but in some churches everyone says their own silent prayer, then the bread and ...


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While I am unable to find any evidence that the Southern Baptist Convention definitely supports the practice, there doesn't seem to be any reason for them to do so. For one thing they/we believe in the "priest-hood" of all believers, so there's no requirement that communion be administered or overseen by an ordained minister. In their "Basic Beliefs" web ...


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Certainly in the case of Lanciano, the Euchartist did not continue as normal. According to Father Saunder's The Miracle of Lanciano This time, when the monk pronounced the words of consecration, the host was miraculously changed into flesh and the wine into blood. The monk was awestruck. Weeping joyously, he regained his composure. He called the ...


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Read just about any commentary and it will tell you that the restrictions in Acts 15 are 1) temporary (for the church at that time), and 2) based on the prohibitions in Leviticus 17 and 18. They are meant for allowing the Jews and Gentiles of the first-century church to integrate so that they could be united. Protestants and Catholics are usually agreed on ...


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Washing of feet - Is it a part of Communion? There are some denominations that practice foot washing as an ordinance. I have heard of some that practice it separate from communion and others that include it with communion. In the Bible it is a recorded event at the same time as the last supper. There is speculation that the argument recorded in Luke ...



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