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During the persecution period of the early Church, the Lord directed Joseph Smith that evil men were seeking to poison the Sacramental wine. Therefore the Saints were to make their own grape juice. Since that became hard to do at they were being expelled from areas, the Church was directed to use water. And since the substance was symbolic anyway, crackers, ...


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Some more conservative Anglo-Catholics may prefer a policy of closed communion, but in the Episcopal Church there is a policy of communion being offered to all who are baptized.


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The Last Supper, the institution of the Eucharist in the synoptic gospels, was the celebration of the seder feast at the commencement of the Jewish day of the Passover. Mark chapter 14 provides brief details of the preparation made for the feast, to be held in a large upper room that was already prepared for the occasion (Mark 14:14-15), and these details ...


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Attendance at a Protestant church, even on a regular basis, does not detract from a baptized Catholic's Catholic identity in the eyes of the Church, and they are still obligated to follow the laws of the Church and the directives of their bishop and pastor: Merely ecclesiastical laws bind those who have been baptized in the Catholic Church or received ...


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Maybe. If upon deciding to join the Protestant church, the Catholic followed canonical forms and procedures, and renounced Catholicism, then the answer would be "No". However, even if the Catholic joined a Protestant church, unless the Catholic renounced the Catholic church following the canonical forms and procedures, the Church considers that he or she ...


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No, because joining a Protestant church makes you a Protestant You may not know this, but... The sacraments of the New Testament were instituted by Christ the Lord and entrusted to the Church. As actions of Christ and the Church, they are signs and means which express and strengthen the faith, render worship to God, and effect the sanctification of ...


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Prohibited participation in sacred rites of non-Catholics (communicatio in sacris) is "to be punished with a just penalty," according to the 1983 Code of Canon Law (Can. 1365). The 1917 Code says: Can. 1258 ยง1. It is not licit for the faithful by any manner to assist actively or to have a part in the sacred [rites] of non-Catholics Thus, for a Catholic ...


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There are two sides to this issue. The first is whether the Catholics consider it appropriate to share communion with those who understand it differently. As a Christian, I want to avoid offending any fellow believer, so I think it would be important to ask if in doubt. The second point is your own conscience. If you feel that the ceremony or understanding ...



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