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This question is missing the real point of WHY Protestants would believe that Transubstantiation is idolatry. Communion was never questioned as not being the actual blood and body of Christ until after 1000 years after Christ. Even the pagans believed that Christians were cannibals from the practice and understanding of Communion. Anglicans and some ...


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Luke 22;11,15,17,19,20 11 And ye shall say unto the goodman of the house, The Master saith unto thee, Where is the guestchamber, where I shall eat the passover with my disciples? 15 And he said unto them, With desire I have desired to eat this passover with you before I suffer: 17 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this and divide it ...


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Priesthood of the LDS church certainly take the Sacrament to the sick and the elderly. In some cases they will attend nursing homes and hospitals and hold a service if the numbers warrant it.


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Simple answer: Not all The opinions of the early Reformers were divided on this issue, with Luther on one end of the spectrum: When asked whether Lutherans should do away with the Elevation of the Host in the liturgy, Luther consistently replied in 1544: By no means, for such abrogation would tend to diminish respect for the Sacrament and cause it to ...


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The real reason for the practice is sanitation concerns. But it has often been justified in the following way: Although the Biblical accounts sound like everyone was drinking directly from one cup, there is a belief that this was not the case due to Jewish traditions about Passover. The Jews are said to require everyone to bring their own cup to the ...


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The practice originated sometime during the Second World War. It is designed to avoid spreading germs or other contagious diseases. Although it certainly unscriptural (i.e., not the way it was done in the Bible) it is an accommodation to modern health practices.


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to avoid transfer of bodily fluids that is possible with a common cup.


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The practice is entirely biblical. At the Last Supper, Christ took a single cup at the end of the meal and handed it round the apostles: Mt 26:27 And he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he gave it to them, saying, “Drink of it, all of you; for this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.” The ...


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Sometimes it's a congregation-by-congregation thing. At one time I attended a church in the URCNA denomination that followed this practice for many years; at some point a new pastor convinced the elders to cease the practice on the grounds of lack of Biblical support.


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Sure. I would add that The Episcopal Church encourages a Lay Eucharistic Ministry by which parishioners are charged with administration of the sacrament to the homebound.


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It is common in the Christian Churches, Churches of Christ, and Disciples of Christ. These are part of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement.


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The Church of England does this. It's an important part of the clergy's ministry to their little bit of the country — and they will go to anyone resident in the parish who would receive communion in the Church of England but can't (so it's not restricted to actual members of the Church of England). Although the Church of England is the established ...


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Short answer: no David's comment is correct, the bread referred to in 1 Corinthians 5 is not the bread of the Lord's supper, but the lives of the believers themselves which should be unleavened by immorality (verses 6-8). Paul extends the metaphor to a feast by including Christ as our Passover lamb (verse 7)


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The feast referred to here is the Lord's Table or Communion. Paul would not be telling the Gentile Corinthian believers to practice the Old Covenant Feast of Passover or any other Old Covenant feast. One answer here is mostly correct. They point to the fact that the feast is Christ. But that misses the point here. The point is that our communion with ...


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It would appear that the feast Paul is referring to is having Christ, look back at: 1st Corinthians 4:5 through 13 King James translation Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts: and then shall every man have praise of ...


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The preceding verses answers your question: 6 Your glorying is not good. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump? 7Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: 8Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the ...


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The Catholic Encyclopedia article gives a good albeit old insight into canonical age. In those days 100 years ago and previous, confirmation was before first Communion. Nowadays in most diocese in the USA that's flipped around. The terms, age of discretion and age of reason are used to describe what is needed for a youth to fully understand what they're ...


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I think it is clear from the text that the eating of the trespass offering in the OT was restricted to males. Women were generally not allowed to touch sacrifices, not sin and trespass offerings anyway, since they menstruate, as is explained in the Apocrypha, in Baruch 6:29 RSV-CE (Also known as Letter of Jeremiah 1:29 in some others translations) ...


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here is a thread running thought this discussion concerning wine being corrupted or spoiled-contaminated and new wine being pure, unadulterated. In the Wedding of Cana Bible story (John 2:1-11) the wedding party runs out of wine. Mary advises Jesus of the situation 6 Now there were six stone water jars there for the Jewish rites of purification, each ...



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