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20

The answer is: "more than likely not". Catholics do allow others to take part in the Holy Communion, but they maintain tight restrictions on this. Guidelines for the Reception of Communion For Other Christians ... Because Catholics believe that the celebration of the Eucharist is a sign of the reality of the oneness of faith, life, and ...


19

The only safe thing to do is to ask the priest beforehand. To willingly participate in someone else's communion when they would say "no" if they knew your story is offensive. As a result, the only option I see is to ask them. If you explain your position, and that you are [insert denomination here], but visiting their congregation with your friends, is it ...


15

Yes, Catholics do believe that the bread and wine are transformed into the body and blood. Sort of. The "sort of" is because the technicalities of it go back to Aristotelian philosophy, which greatly influenced Thomas Aquinas, who is still in many ways the preeminent theologian of the Catholic Church. Before we get to Aquinas, though, let's look at the ...


14

You are correct that most Protestants do not see the bread and wine as anything more than symbols. There is no blessing that is ever attempted to transform the elements into the literal body and blood of Christ. Consequently, the bread and wine (or juice) that could be stored for long periods of time prior to the observance of the Eucharist (the Lord's ...


12

The Protestant practice of traditionally substituting grape juice for wine during communion must largely be credited to one man - Thomas Bramwell Welch From Wikipedia: While some Christians consider the use of wine from the grape as essential for the validity of the sacrament, many Protestants also allow (or require) pasteurized grape juice as a ...


12

An accidental spill of the Precious Blood can be cleaned up by soaking it up by placing a "purificator" which is a linen specially reserved to come into contact with the consecrated wine (one can use multiple of this linens depending the quantity of liquid) and then soaking them back in water do dissolve or dilute the Precious Blood. Then it can be poured ...


11

As you note, there are lots of different traditions here. My ancestry is Scottish and some old Scottish churches only celebrate communion once a year. I've looked through the some liturgies for these services that basically run all day, and it's quite an affair. I have even heard it advocated that once in a life-time ought to do the job, sort of like ...


11

There's an article here that covers the history of intinction quite extensively. (I apologize that it's a PDF reference. It's the best article I could find.) The article starts out like this: The common wisdom among opponents of intinction is that it arose after the doctrine of transubstantiation, and was a method of preventing Christ's blood ...


10

One aspect I don't see addressed in other posts is the significance of bread and wine. Yes, it's because that's what Jesus said to do, but he did not merely pick to random substances to represent himself. Although I would argue that John 6 does not have sacramental overtones in mind per se, we do see Jesus using bread to represent himself. A couple of ...


10

Symbolic meaning of the bread and wine JW's do not accept transubstantiation (the unyeasted bread means/symbolizes Jesus' perfect and sinless body and the wine represents his blood he sacrificed to save humankind from the sinful state inherited by Adam and to seal the second covenant). The biblical verses in the New World Translation (NWT), the ...


9

John's Gospel does not contain many of the things recorded in the Synoptics, including the Sermon on the Mount, the Transfiguration, the virgin birth, the Great Commission, and the Ascension. In fact, the only miracle outside of the Resurrection that appears in both the Synoptic gospels and John's gospel is the feeding of the 5,000. This doesn't mean that ...


9

tldr version: It is not normally permissible by Cannon law for you to partake of the bread and wine. However, you can still join the communion line and indicate you would like a blessing by placing your index finger over your lips (similar to shhing someone) or by crossing your arms over your chest in the shape of an 'X' when you approach the minister. The ...


9

This is the analogy that Jesus chose at his last supper. Matt 26:26-29 (NIV) 26 While they were eating, Jesus took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to his disciples, saying, “Take and eat; this is my body.” 27 Then he took a cup, and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, saying, “Drink from it, all of you. 28 ...


9

On the Meaning of Transubstantial To me, the prefix "trans" is the key. Transformation is change of form Transmutation is change of shape Transfiguration is change of appearance Transubstantiation is the change of substance. While often one will be related to another, it does not follow that there is a co-dependence. So, while it is possible that ...


8

It seems that regulations and opinions on this are varied. It depends (very strongly) on the denomination and what they believe. Key Verse: I'll put this here for later reference: 1 Corinthians 11:27-28 (NIV) 27 So then, whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of sinning against the body and blood ...


8

Communion with bread and wine is common in most Christian denominations, although it can mean different things to different denominations (see What do different denominations mean when they talk about the Real Presence in the Eucharist?). The bread and wine are from the Last Supper. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Supper The Last Supper is the final ...


8

Per @awe and @Jamess, there are really two sides of this. It can go either way. Are you breaking your fast? Yes. You truly are. But you have to question: Why am I fasting? If you are fasting in order to grow closer to God and find reliance only on him, then taking communion would not necessarily be bad. Since communion is meant to draw us to God, ...


8

I can give you an answer based on my experience. I live in Rome, I'm Catholic, and I have travelled quite a lot. Every time I travel I search a local catholic mass. I can tell you with a 99% of certainty that this is a cultural matter, dependinding on the community. Here in Rome people is more or less ordered and goes in line. In France they have a more ...


8

As far as the Roman Catholic Church and the Church of England are concerned, it certainly is Canon Law. 900 §1. The minister who is able to confect the sacrament of the Eucharist in the person of Christ is a validly ordained priest alone. 907 In the eucharistic celebration deacons and lay persons are not permitted to offer prayers, especially the ...


7

For my part, I can quote the inside flap of the Missal in the pew which says, Catholics believe that the Bread and Wine become the Body and Blood of Christ (not a symbol, but actual fact). It goes on to say, the Catholic Church permits eastern Orthodox adherents to come to Catholic Mass, celebrate the Eucharist and receive communion. But Catholics are not ...


7

The LDS church proscribes wine (or any alcoholic beverage, really), so water is used instead, although it doesn't matter what is used for the symbols of the sacrament, according to Doctrine and Covenants in the LDS canon: D&C 27:2 2 For, behold, I say unto you, that it mattereth not what ye shall eat or what ye shall drink when ye partake of the ...


7

I am aware of one protestant view that has not been brought up, so here it is for your consideration: To interpret John 6:53 we examine the context, close to the beginning of the conversation, at John 6:35. "He that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst." In this verse Jesus sets up the interpretation for the ...


7

I would say they erred on the side of caution. Your baptism is fully valid in the Catholic Church and since you are mature enough to distinguish the Eucharist from regular food you have every right to partake. However, because you were raised in a Baptist church, you did not receive a Catholic education nor did you have a Catholic confirmation. (In fact the ...


7

As far as both Catholics and Orthodox are concerned, you need a validly ordained priest to confect the Eucharist.(see e.g. CCC, ¶1411) As far as they are concerned, none of the churches that originate from the Reformation period have what is required for a valid priesthood (i.e. bishops in unbroken tactile succession from the Apostles(see CCC, ¶1576)), so ...


7

It's clearly because Catholics believe that the bread and wine are the physical Body and Blood of Christ. Protestants do not. So, therefore, it's a fundamentally different ritual in Protestant churches. The 1896 Papal Bull declaring all Anglican denominations to be "null and void" was after hundreds and hundreds of years of disagreement on the fundamental ...


6

The reason for the different traditions of frequency of communion is that there are a wide variety of views within Christianity about what communion actually is. It is so widely disagreed over that Christians often can't agree over what name to call it. The different theologies give rise to different practices of communion, including different frequencies. ...


6

I don't think there is any problem with the order Martin Luther used, as it is the same as the order used by Christ in the Last Supper. I do believe the 1324 order is likely used due to it scaling a little better when the bread and wine are distributed after consecrating them. The Last Supper was only a few people, compared to a Sunday service which could ...


6

(wider Christianity perspective, not Catholicism specific...) This will vary from denomination to denomination, and much hangs on what the "this" is referring to in Jesus' instruction "do this in remembrance of me". One view is that he was referring to eating together. He happened to have bread and wine handy but these days it could as easily be chips and ...


6

Yes, but receiving the species of consecrated wine alone is not common. During Mass, the celebrant(s) separately consecrates the Bread to the Body, Blood, Spirit and Divinity of Christ, and the Wine to the Body, Blood, Spirit and Divinity of Christ. Each is equally divine, and each is the Eucharist. The priest signifies this by taking a piece of the host ...



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