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14

Our bodies are not the church. The verse in 2 Corinthians that you quote says that our bodies are temples. In context this is saying that we (rather than a building) are the dwelling place of the Holy Spirit. In the OT his presence would rest in the temple and that was considered his dwelling among his chosen people. In the NT this took a new form -- the ...


13

No. Actually yes it is of course quite possible, but if someone is asking this question at all, it is likely that there is some other issue. Fellowship and the community of saints is such a basic part of the Christian faith that someone who wants to avoid that part on purpose has probably not understood the purpose of church at all and may not have the kind ...


13

This depends on what your church services provide for you and your own life situation. As a Catholic, I can't really do that because I cannot receive Eucharist at home, unless a priest comes over, in which case I could. But this doesn't lend itself well to internet services. Another common reason people go to a service is because of fellowship and ...


12

Benefits of going to church regularly: During Holy Mass, receiving the Body and Blood of our Lord regularly, brings us into continuous reminder that God is with us and in us. If we believe that, then it has a huge affect on our behavior and mind set. Being with a community of believers is extremely encouraging. When I see fellow believers humble themselves ...


11

This all kind of depends on what you mean by "young". Titus 1:5 - 9 has a more detailed description of what an elder should be: Titus 1:5 - 9 5 I left you on the island of Crete so you could complete our work there and appoint elders in each town as I instructed you. 6 An elder must live a blameless life. He must be faithful to his wife, ...


11

The purpose of congregational gathering is not exclusively to provide the laity access to someone who can be a mediator between them and God, so the assumption that the priesthood of all believers is mutually exclusive is invalid. Gathering as a congregation has many purposes, including mutual edification, encouragement toward love and good deeds, ...


11

At least part of this answer I believe comes through obedience to the many ‘one another’ commands of the New Testament. We are exhorted in various ways to be involved with and caring for one another: To admonish one another (Rom. 15:14) To comfort and encourage one another (1 Thess. 4:18; 5:11; Heb. 3:13) To worship with one another (Eph. 5:19; Col. ...


11

This answer relates to the Church of Scotland. Dancing has often been regarded with deep suspicion in the Presbyterian tradition. Originally, it was strongly associated with all kinds of bad behaviour, and would certainly not be permitted in church. Even after dancing became more socially acceptable, church was still meant to be a solemn and sober place. ...


11

The Church is presented as the Body of Christ (an organism, not an organization [e.g., 1 Cor. 12:12+]) and as the household of faith (a family, not a club [e.g., Gal. 6:10]--also sons of God, brothers and sisters). As the Body of Christ there is an implication of a different kind of life (this may address a spiritual nature), an implication of diversity ...


10

In Paul's letter to the Galatians, he adresses this issue about wrong learning in the church: Galatians 1:8 (KJV): But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed. See the following where this verse is shown in different translations, and at the bottom some ...


10

The way the question is phrased means we must look at two historical developments: How preaching evolved in the early church, from Jesus through the pioneer stage of Acts to the early church fathers. How preaching evolved in the protestant church, from Luther into what we have today. Also, one must note the context of the preaching: Small group, large ...


9

"Condemn" is a rather strong word. I think you just should not be a part of it. I would not be a part of a church like that either. Their is no lack of bad Christians in the world unfortunately. As long as you do not think that those radical views are speaking for Christianity as a whole. Matthew 7:1 (ESV) Judge not, that you be not judged. I do not ...


9

After watching "What is the Church?" , I posed myself a question: "What happens if my Church (the building) was taken down? Or my cell group being taken away? Would there still be Church?" Answer is simply Yes. For the Church exists in each and everyone who believes, trusts, and acknowledges our Saviour - simply because each of us is a part of Christ's ...


9

It is a fairly natural idea to have somebody fulfilling this role, and various Christian traditions have done just that. The following are from Worship music: a concise dictionary (ed. Edward Foley, 2000): Cantor [Latin]. "Singer" (1) In Christianity, a 5th-century term for the psalmist; later, the medieval singer (often cleric) who intoned and led the ...


9

Dr. Donald McGavran's definition of a homogeneous unit is "a section of society in which all members have some characteristic in common." In plainer terms, a homogeneous unit is a group of people that have ethnic, linguistic, social, educational, or vocational similarities. In terms of a church congregation, ethnic, social, and educational commonalities ...


8

From Paul's own writing to Timothy, specifically verse 12: Let no one look down on your youthfulness, but rather in speech, conduct, love, faith and purity, show yourself an example of those who believe. So no, there is no "age requirement", but one must at least fulfill the prerequisites listed in Titus 1 & 1 Timothy 3. As a sidebar, Jesus ...


8

Going to Church is like a spiritual version of a meal. While it won't kill you to miss one or two, you should do it regularly for best results. That said, a regularly scheduled event that you attend over Church is not a good idea. If you don't eat for 6 months, you die. Missing Church for that length of time could potentially be that devastating ...


8

You are correct in viewing the priesthood of all believers as obviating the need for a mediator between oneself and God - but there is also incumbent upon the participant a duty, as a priest, to minister to one's fellow congregants. Put simply, without a congregation, there is no one to minister. As a member in the priesthood of all believers, I am to ...


8

Yes and No It is fair to say that Baptist services are liturgical, but I don't think I'd say that they have "a" liturgy (meaning that they generally adhere to a common liturgy). Many Baptist churches I've been to don't quite follow the formula you described. Most follow it somewhat, but I think that to call it a common liturgy, it needs to be followed ...


8

The "coreness" of your stated doctrines should really be divided into two groups: Group 1 (Requires Explanation - See Below) Doctrine of the Trinity Deity of Jesus Group 2 (A Lot! see Methodists in particular) Predestination Millenialism Dispensationalism The doctrines in Group 2 are actually rather narrow in scope and are rarely considered ...


7

This is a great question. In the Presbyterian churches I have participated in they have had the following structure: Denomination - An organization (often national) that oversees many different regional bodies (in my denomination called Presbyteries). It is a representative democracy, where each Presbytery has a representative and they vote to determine ...


7

Yes and no. Calvin said something to the effect of "God cannot be your Father if the Church is not your mother," his point being that the church is very, very important to the spiritual life of the Christian. Most if not all New Testament letters are addressed to specific churches, in Acts orders are given as to the order of worship, and Hebrews 10:24 says ...


7

To be honest, you have a good point. We're all here for the same reason, to glorify God and rejoice in his Son, our savior. For most intents and purposes, any denomination of Christianity will get you that much. As far as being part of a body of Christians at all, I believe this to be essential. Time alone is also necessary, but good Christian fellowship ...


7

It's cultural. This is a Catholic answer, but not based on Catholic Dogma or even the Bible. It's just common sense. In the Western Hemisphere, and western Europe (commonly and ruefully [here at least] referred to as the West) we don't need dance to communicate. Furthermore, we can't even interpret dance as language. In African (and other) cultures ...


7

Do any Christian denominations have any policies to prevent nepotism? Short answer: Yes The modern Catholic Church does, as of June 22, 1692. Pope Innocent XII. Innocent XII gave nepotism a death blow by his celebrated Bull "Romanum decet Pontificem," 22 June 1692. However, it does not appear to have actually ended the practice. Romanum ...


7

TL;DR Yes. Everyone is welcome. (Matthew 28:16-20) The apostles were instructed to teach all nations in the Great Commission. There are many other verses that reiterate that everyone is welcome and I could be here all day going through all of them. One of my favorites on the subject is Paul's statement that he became all things to all men so that he might ...


7

Baptismal certificates are still used by Churches for whom Trinitarian baptism is important. This is so that they can be certain that someone has been validly baptised. The Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox Churches recognise each other’s baptisms and those of many other denominations as a valid, once-for-all and transferable sacrament. But it can only be ...


7

I attended meetings of the Vineyard for a period of a year and the members there exercised the gifts of the Spirit, with multiple people, one at a time, giving revelation and prophesying, tongues and interpretations. Then they bunched together and prayed for healings for the afflicted. I attended a Brethren-inspired gathering for about 8 years. There, they ...


6

None. Every time the Bible presents the belivers it presents them in a context of a group. The biblical christian (believer in the Bible) always get together in houses, underground. Here are a few passages tackling this subject: Romans 12.3-8 1 Corianthians 12.12-31 1 Peter 2.4-5 Heb 10.25 The argument advanced by the non-church goer is all over the ...



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