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Where in the Bible does it say that Peter was a Bishop? The English word "bishop" is commonly translated from the Greek word ἐπίσκοπος (episkopos). The noun ἐπίσκοπος literally means "one who watches over," i.e. overseer. In the New Testament, the ἐπίσκοπος was essentially synonymous with the "elder," or Greek πρεσβύτερος (presbyteros), as demonstrated ...


4

The Bible does not mention Peter as ever going to Rome, and there is no early Christian record of this being the case. Even at the end of the first century, the author of 1 Clement appears unaware that St. Peter ever came to Rome. Written from Rome, 1 Clement mentions Peter's 'many labours' and makes a general comment about Peter's death, without mentioning ...


11

Augustine of Hippo is basically universally credited with the coinage of the phrase. It is an idea which can easily be supported by the Bible, but he was the first to say it in a form close to its present proverbial form. He probably didn't think he was coining a cliche, since it was neatly hidden away in a letter to a convent. This blog has a summary of the ...


5

It did indeed, though not that exact phrase. It was St. Augustine in his Letter 211 (A.D. 423), in point number 11: ... If she refuse to submit to this, and does not go away from you of her own accord, let her be expelled from your society. For this is not done cruelly but mercifully, to protect very many from perishing through infection of the plague ...


2

The second century church father Irenaeus was probably the first. Against Heresies: Book III Chapter XI-Proofs in Continuation, Extracted from St. John's Gospel. The Gospels are Four in Number, Neither More Nor Less. Mystic Reasons for This. It is not possible that the Gospels can be either more or fewer in number than they are. For, since there are ...


0

The Catholic Encyclopedia article "Symbolism" says claims they were prominent in "the art of the early Middle Ages": For the Evangelists there have been used from very early times certain conventional emblems — a winged man or an angel for St. Matthew, a winged lion for St. Mark, a winged calf for St. Luke, and an eagle for St. John. All these are taken ...


3

The source of this tradition is the words of Jesus in Matthew 16:18, which I reprint in the context of Matthew 16:13-18, to allow a comparison with Mark's slightly earlier version ofthe same event: When Jesus went into the region of Caesarea Philippi 9 he asked his disciples, "Who do people say that the Son of Man is?" They replied, "Some say John ...



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