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4

Original source Henry's quote is verbatim from Christoph Pezel's 1590 book Außführliche, warhaffte und bestendige Erzehlung, and he mentions Pezel in a footnote to the paragraph prior to the story. Many sources indicate that the story originates with Pezel. Credibility I found a few historians who weighed in on whether the story was credible or not. Paul ...


4

The paramilitary organisations did not hold particular theological positions and members were not, in general, especially pious. They were, for the most part, members or adherents of their respective churches. For Protestants this was mainly Presbyterian and Anglican. Religious background, as a proof of allegiance and a guard against infiltration, was ...


0

The definitive difference between what St. Augustine believed and what Luther in all honesty came up with himself is quite different. It's like this: St. Augustine taught that grace is itself transformative and is infused into the soul of humanity, whereby changing their condition and makes the sinner righteous before God. So that when God sees the persons ...


2

This article by Stephen E. Saint is a little out of date (1998), but suggests unfinished business. Saint says that there were many conversions among the older generation, who appreciated the arrival of a force that ended the constant rounds of killing, and appreciated things such as medical help. However only a handful of the younger generation is ...


1

The Vulgate Psalm 83:5 has saecula saeculorum, so I suppose a useful starting point would be an Anglo-Saxon psalter, as these did exist whereas vernacular Bibles didn't; but I can't find one online. Wycliffe (around 1390) translated Ps 84:5† into Late Middle English as "into the worlds of worlds", which is a fairly literal rendering of the Latin. ...


14

"Secret" is probably about the worst possible translation I can think of for the original term. The "Archivio Segreto Vaticano" is the current term in Italian, as documented on the Archive's website. This translates the Latin "Archivium Secretum Vaticanum" (see for example the references here). Secretum in Latin, however, does not necessarily mean "secret". ...


2

The Bible used today by Christians was dived into chapter and verse by Catholic Arch Bishop Stephen Langton. Prior to this, Jewish Rabbi,s had devided the OT, the OT used in their calendar, so that is could be used is worship through the year. This was their Catechism and their Liturgy.


4

The best data on this topic that I'm aware of comes from the Atlas of Global Christianity, which describes how Christian missions has changed between 1910 and 2010 (unfortunately, if it does include tradition-level data, I don't have access to it). An overview report summarizes its findings: The growth in missionary sending from the Global South is ...


1

St. Thomas Aquinas appears to believe this. He wrote in Summa Theologica II-II q. 1 a. 9 ("Whether it is suitable for the articles of faith to be embodied in a symbol?") ad 6: …the symbol of the Fathers…was drawn up after the faith was already spread abroad, and when the Church was already at peace…. … the symbol of the Apostles… was drawn up at the time ...


0

There are many differences in wording, although with very similar meaning, allowing the assumption that the two creeds are independent of each other, linked only by being based on an earlier baptismal creed. Even so, the authors of the 381 Creed were inevitably aware of the Nicene Creed of 325. Actual evidence that the Creed of 381 is dependent on the Creed ...


-1

In the catacombs, the rich or more well to do would leave some sort of memento at the tomb of a saint as a reminder of a particular saint to pray for them. The poor and slaves would simply write on the walls things like "Petri ora pro Victor" (Peter pray for Victor). I can still remember seeing this sort of graffiti along with various other debris in the ...


-1

The Roman Catholic Church teaches that Saint Augustine was from Thagaste in Africa and that Saint Augustine was, by today's racially-charged language, Black. Saint Augustine confesses in many of his homilies that he was a sexually-charged youth espousing socially deleterious political philosophies before his conversion; what mattered was not skin tone but ...


9

A satisfactory answer requires that we examine the development of the Apostles' Creed through history. We'll deal with the question in three parts: Does today's version match that of the apostles? Does any version come from the apostles? When did today's version first appear? Does the current form of the creed come from the apostles? The strongest ...


7

I've found two sources online for the Latin text, but unfortunately nothing in English. The Latin is available in Gousset's Les actes de la province ecclésiastique de Reims, page 233, as well as Hefele's Conciliengeschichte, volume IV, page 187. The first of these includes a very brief introduction in French, while the second has more extensive commentary ...


-2

Well, in the Adoremus Hymnal the 11th century translation of the Sub Tuum Praesidium is sung. That dates as early as 250Ad....but more likely 200AD Beneath your compassion,We take refuge, O Mother of God:do not despise our petitions in time of trouble:but rescue us from dangers,only pure, only blessed one. But the Mass Settings in any Roman Catholic Hymnal ...


7

Piotr Ashwin-Siejkowski in his book, The Apostles's Creed: and its Early Christian Context, argues that Pilate was specifically mentioned primarily in order to argue for and defend the humanity and real death of Jesus. He first emphasizes the historical importance of Pilate to Christianity: Certainly the Scriptural detail that Jesus of Nazareth was ...


3

First, the Creed does not say Pilate killed Jesus. As you point out in your question, there was plenty of blame to go around for Jesus' death. Biblically, we (i.e., you and me and every person who ever lived) are partly to blame. Let's also not forget that God the Father . . . did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all . . .. This ...


-3

On the day the LORD gave the Amorites over to Israel, Joshua said to the LORD in the presence of Israel: "O sun, stand still over Gibeon, O moon, over the Valley of Aijalon." So the sun stood still, and the moon stopped, till the nation avenged itself on its enemies, as it is written in the Book of Jashar. The sun stopped in the middle of the sky and ...



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