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In mosaic law the Priests would offer sacrifice and do this on a table, the table was referred to as an alter. Christ who offered himself up as a sacrifice for all, offered himself up on a Cross. His symbol is often referred to as a tree. In the Catholic Church when you enter into the sanctuary you bow down to three places mostly. First to the tabernacle ...


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Anselm's satisfaction theory of the atonement is developed in his book, Cur Deus Homo, and, as presented, is not "based on the Bible" like we might expect. Instead, Anselm relies heavily on logic, and largely avoids citing Scripture to make his case. However, he is forced to rely on it in a few places, and he also tangentially mentions it in others. For ...


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He was certainly not arab as they came much later......as they is no such thing as the berber race..... Being a berber is to be racially mixed....iam talking about light skinned berbers. If he was light skinned that would mean he was either a mixture of non-african and another dark skinned african. Given that indigenous inhabitants of the continent were not ...


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A smoking gun is in the references that John Calvin makes to Thomas Aquinas in his own book, The Institutes of the Christian Religion (II.11.4 and III.22.9). This is evidence that Calvin at least knew of Aquinas, which suggests that Aquinas' most important work had reached France or Switzerland and that he would probably have read it. Mark J. Larson says ...


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It appears we have no true historical information on the alleged vision of Pope Leo XIII. The Global Catholic Network says that in 1934 a German writer, Father Bers, investigated the origins of the story of Leo’s vision. “Wherever one looks,” he observed, “one may find this claim — but nowhere a trace of proof.” Father Bers quoted a priest who visited with ...


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The simplifying or outright dismantling of liturgies has been in train since the beginning of the Reformation, particularly as it started to unfold in Switzerland under Huldrych Zwingli. From the linked Wikipedia article: Shortly before Easter (1525), Zwingli and his closest associates requested the council to cancel the mass and to introduce the new ...


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It appears that Augustine believed that purgatory was real, but didn't believe the matter was settled. His agnosticism seems clearest in this passage: It is a matter that may be inquired into, and either ascertained or left doubtful, whether some believers shall pass through a kind of purgatorial fire, and in proportion as they have loved with more or ...


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I'm not aware of any mainstream churches that baptize adults while they are nude, though when I lived in Mexico the churches often didn't have facilities to perform baptisms in the church and would have these ceremonies at the river. When this occurred the men and boys often wore only a pair of brief shorts. This, of course, was hardly nude baptism. In the ...


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A great deal of early Church art showed baptism being done in the nude. This would not have been shocking in the world of the early Church, as many early Christians were slaves. Most slaves in the Roman world owned no more than one garment, and many were given no clothing at all, particularly those who mainly performed hard physical labor. Below are some ...


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In short, yes: a range of language, cultural and theological differences separate them. The various groups have evolved from different sects that schismed during the Roman Empire period (2nd to 7th centuries AD). Some of the differences are discussed in more detail here, here, here and here.


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Open persecution: There is considerable evidence that while the Christians did suffer occasional persecution, particularly around 250 and in the Great Persecution of 303-311, Christian tradition seems to have exaggerated the extent of such persecution. Richard Holland sees the accusations laid against Emperor Nero to be far fetched, saying in Nero: The Man ...


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The first chapter of John Stott's The Cross of Christ provides a history of the development of the use of the symbol of the cross in Christianity. I'll briefly summarize it here. Pre-cross images The earliest images used by Christians did not include the cross. Persecution required that they be circumspect, which meant that an image clearly associated ...


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To answer the "when" question, the exact date is unknown (patron saint assignments were not decided by official decree, but rather were adopted by people over time), but the association dates back to at least the Middle Ages. As alluded to by previous answers, there are two theories on "why" question. Theory 1: anointing Jesus' feet The first is that ...


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The book Flower, the Story of the Nativity (p126-27), by Wayne E. Stahre, includes an interesting footnote in reference to this: Mary Magdalene is the patron saint of hairdressers. The Talmud refers to a "medadela neshaya," which apparently means "women's hairdresser." The word "megadela"or "mgadla" has a phonetic connection to the name "Magdalene," and ...


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To answer your main question: The Council of Laodicea, being a regional council, would only have been binding on the Faithful living in the region (specifically, on areas that were represented by their bishops). Being only a regional, and not an ecumenical council, it is not binding on all the Faithful. For your question about scripture, the answer is a ...



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