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10

The chair was real, but its actual function is different from what the legend says. And actually, it seems to have been three chairs: one "commode"-type seat, and two porphyry "pierced" chairs. Read on for more. In Misconceptions About the Middle Ages (page 66-7; ed. Harris and Grigsby), a description is given of the chairs' function in papal coronations: ...


11

It seems virtually undisputed that Theophilus of Antioch (d. 183) is your man. He wrote in Greek: [God's creations on the first three days--light, sky, and vegetation--] are types of the Trinity, of God, and His Word, and His wisdom. And the fourth [day, the creation of the moon and stars,] is the type of man, who needs light, that so there may be God, ...


4

I've seen a few candidates put forward. Valentinus the Gnostic (100 - 160) Writing about two hundred years later against the Arian heresy, Marcellus of Ancyra (himself possibly a Sabellian) wrote: These then teach three hypostases, just as Valentinus the heresiarch first invented in the book entitled by him On the Three Natures. For he was the first to ...


-3

If it was from biblical times and not some made up ritual, I remind you that Paul says 'brothers.' Though this may have no bearing on this particular rite, Adelphpoiesis is most likely a very close like-brothership between few peopl, but certainly not limited to two.


9

You may find a book that shows his writing about the followers of Islam On Heresies (see 101) by St. John of Damascus . The writing of St. John of Damascus basically runs like this: (Actually he does not really say that much in depth, or from argumentation from scripture but still it is interesting) He mentions Mohammed and his book He pokes fun at the ...


0

Until at least 400 AD, Christians were reluctant to make any image of Christ, due to idolatry. Occasionally Christ was pictured as a lamb, as He is several times represented in the Bible. An image at Edessa began to be regarded as a likeness of Christ, and was said to have been made by Christ himself. Church leaders contended that it was therefore ...


3

Owen Chadwick, in his book The Reformation, gives a few lists of the vices Erasmus saw in the church: Erasmus was not fired by a reforming passion or zeal. But his sensible and scholarly nose was otherwise offended by the stink of corruption. He despised ignorance, superstition, obscurantism, and wished to cure them. Because his pen was able to portray ...


-2

Aren't the Nicolaitans the guys who formed the Roman Catholic Church? For a time the Nicolaitans were thought to be followers of a guy named Nicholas. Catholic scholarship (which you would think had the greatest reason to support such a view) has found this to not be supported. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11067a.htm I think we can see in human nature ...


5

Nicolaism refers to one or more groups of doctrines, apparently held by a group or groups founded by a Nicolaus, Nicolas, or Nikolaos (depending on exactly how you Anglicize the Greek name). There are a couple of these mentioned in the very early church, but it's unclear what exactly the content of the heresy is. You refer to "the practice of ruling over the ...


-2

The Roman Catholic Church was formed by Christ fully man and fully God. The Nicolaitans are those who fallowed the teaching of Nicolas, a heretic who stressed that matter was evil Christ could not be God and man but only appeared in the form of man. Reference The Panarion of Epiphanius: Panarion 25 This is a reference from an early Church father pointing ...


1

As far as I know, both Lutherans and Calvinists are not subscribed to ritualistic pattern. The Great Apostasy article in Wikipedia, I believe, refers to the 'ritualistic' apostasy which were increasing in the period of pre-reformation. Doctrine-wise, Luther and Calvin do not differ on great apostasy, as they hold on 'Sola Gratia, Sola Fide, Sola Scriptura'. ...


-2

Although "forelove" is not a term you find in Scripture, it is strongly implied as part of the foreknowledge of God. Romans 8:28-29 " And we know that all things work together for good for those who love God, who are called according to his purpose, because those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son..." This verse ...


2

Martyrs were honoured from earliest times, and Christian tradition certainly says that some notable Christians sought out and hoped for martyrdom. While some of these tales seem fanciful, no doubt others did seek out the honour of martyrdom and the glory they hoped for in the next life. Alvar Ellegard says, in Jesus One Hundred Years Before Christ, page ...


0

I'd like to point out respectfully that, from some perspectives, this question is based on a false assumption: "... if evidence of the hierarchy exists from the first century, a principle of historical continuity can be invoked to bring the institution quite near the earliest community." This assumes that the earliest community of organized Christianity was ...


4

To trace the evolution of church institutions, as well as where Catholics and Protestants disagree about them, one will find that they agree on the facts but disagree on their meaning. There is nothing in the ‘facts’ that cause dispute, but as in all never-ending disputes, it is the prior assumptions that divide us. The cause in this subject is probably ...



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