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I can scarcely disagree with Affable Geek when he says everyone had an agenda. I am also very much in agreement with his assessment of Tacitus, Flavius Josephus and later Christian "historians." Therefore, I do not propose to reiterate the reasons those historians can not be regarded as entirely reliable. Where I may, with respect, disagree is in the ...


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The statement that the faith of the Romans “is being reported all over the world” (Romans 1:8) is evidence that the Christian community of Rome had grown to some size. Raymond E.Brown says in An Introduction to the New Testament, page 561, that Paul’s letter implies that the community had been in existence for a long time, since he had been wishing “for many ...


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Presbyterian. Robert Bruce Mullin says in 'North America', published in A World History of Christianity (edited by Adrian Hastings), pages 437-8, that Southern religious figures claimed not only that was slavery a positive good, but that it was a Christian institution. He cites the Presbyterian theologian Charles Hodge (1797-1878), who insisted, “nothing ...


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Mark 12:17, draws a clear distinction, with government (Caesar) to be obeyed on matters of concern to the government and God to be obeyed on matters of religion (at this point there is no suggestion that the Church itself is to be obeyed on behalf of God): And Jesus answering said unto them, Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the ...


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Early date for Paul's undisputed epistles Paul's epistles were written by Paul. Since his mission covers the time of King Aretus of Nabataea as well as the Great Famine, we can reliably date the epistles to around the first half of the first century. Possible dates for Acts of the Apostles The assumption that Acts must have been written within a ...


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I think part of the issue may be the differing meanings of the word "possess". We typically use the word today to mean "to own" or "to have"; but this is not the original meaning. Etymonline.com records the original meaning of the word (when it entered English at the end of the 1300s) as being "'to hold, occupy, reside in' (without regard to ownership)". ...


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The Apostle Peter told us that many false religious teachers will come from within the church itself. 2 Peter 2:1 (NASB) But false prophets also arose among the people, just as there will also be false teachers among you, who will secretly introduce destructive heresies, even denying the Master who bought them, bringing swift destruction upon ...


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"'Every kingdom divided against itself goes to ruin, and a divided household falls. Equally if Satan is divided against himself, how can his kingdom stand?--since as you would have it, I drive out the devils by Beelzebub. If it is by Beelzebub that I cast out devils, by whom do your own people drive them out? If this is your argument, they themselves will ...


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There are several different forms of verbs used in the New Testament translated as possessed. You seem to be conflicting between these two: δαιμονίζομαι daimonizomai.....dahee-mon-id'-zom-ahee Middle voice from G1142; to be exercised by a daemon: - have a (be vexed with, be possessed with) devil (-s). Total KJV occurrences: 13 And this one: ...


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The Book of Watchers, in the aprocryphal 1 Enoch*, is the earliest specific, pre-Christian reference to the fallen angels, at least in the Septuagint version. Annette Yoshiko Reed says in an innovative twist on earlier Jewish traditions, Justin Martyr (c. 100-165) proposed that the progeny of the fallen angels, described in Genesis 6.1–4, became demons who ...


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As close as I can understand these Scriptures they apply to the fallen Angels: Revelation 12:7 through 9 NKJV And war broke out in heaven: Michael and his angels fought with the dragon; and the dragon and his angels fought, 8 but they did not prevail, nor was a place found for them in heaven any longer. 9 So the great dragon was cast out, that serpent ...


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Origin of the idea that “demons” and “fallen angels” are the same thing? There is a description of angels that went bad. Jude 1:6 And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day. While Revelation is often called allegorical or ...


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Every now and then I hear a non-Catholic Christian say, "Catholics are not Christians." Very often communication that is made to express emotion is taken as attempting to communicate fact and confusion ensues. This can frequently be seen in arguments between husbands and wives. I'd really like to know the thought process of those who say that "Catholics ...


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Evangelicals would say that there were faithful churches who kept the gospel before the reformation. I think there are two historical factors involved: Protestants recognise several movements of like-minded people before the reformation, such as the Lollards and Hussites. I think that Luther himself at one time admitted that his own beliefs essentially ...


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[Answering from the perspective of my Non-Denominational Evangelical Church] Evangelical Christians give a lot of emphasis on "Born Again Christian". As the Wikipedia article says, Evangelicals are Christians who believe in the centrality of the conversion or "born again" experience in receiving salvation, believe in the authority of the Bible as ...


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Amongst non-denominational evangelicals, a Christian is often regarded as being synonymous with someone who has been born again (regenerated) a la John 3:3 - Jesus replied, “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again.” - John 3:3 NIV They regard regeneration (or 'getting saved') as something that occurs if and ...


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I have not been able to find evidence of a Baptist argument for slavery that differs from other pro-slavery denominations. Rev. Richard Furman (for whom Furman University was named) published a philosophical defense of slavery that alluded to biblical support but did not elaborate on it. The proof texts would have been well known to his readers. The ...


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You're correct that nowhere in the Gospels does Jesus condone slavery--nor does he speak out against it. Outside the Gospels, numerous Bible passages have been used in defense of slavery through the years. The starting point for Christian justification of slavery is Genesis 9:24-27. When Noah awoke from his wine and knew what his youngest son had done ...


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Robert Bruce Mullin says in 'North America', published in A World History of Christianity (edited by Adrian Hastings), pages 437-8, that Southern religious figures claimed not only that was slavery a positive good, but that it was a Christian institution. This slavery argument gained a specific religious dimension, and the northern Protestants faced a ...


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The first case of prayer to the departed saints is documented in the divine liturgy. In the New Testaments prayer through the departed are mentioned in 2 Tim 1:16-18 (Paul prayed for Onesiphorus) and in Revelation 5:8 (Saints in Heaven receive prayers). As a former Calvinist I used to read these passages in isolation to how that texts were read and ...


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Joyce Baldwin's commentary on Daniel says (pg. 129): Verse 10 supplies welcome evidence concerning prayer habits during the later biblical period. Windows . . . open toward Jerusalem is a literal understanding of Solomon's petition [at the dedication of the temple], 'When [foreigners] hear about your great reputation and your ability to ...


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There is a short prequel to the gospels called the Protevangelium of James, supposedly written about 150 ad., but it is noncanonical and certainly not an eyewitness account. The author claims to have been walking in a field and this vision just came to him. Although I don't believe that it is authentic history, it does mention Mary going into a cave with her ...


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The Belgic Confession (1561) states (Art. 4): " They are canonical books with which there can be no quarrel at all." and (Art. 5) "And we believe without a doubt all things contained in them." That's a long way before 1978, and you might find even older texts stating similar things. Catholic and Protestant churches share the same tradition here. During the ...


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The earliest reference I can find is Justin Martyr (c. 100 – 165 AD) who wrote in Dialog With Trypho: But when the Child was born in Bethlehem, since Joseph could not find a lodging in that village, he took up his quarters in a certain cave near the village; and while they were there Mary brought forth the Christ and placed Him in a manger. (1)


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This selected Aerarius' answer to What are the main differences between the Catholic and Protestant definitions of Biblical inerrancy? said: There is not any real difference between the Catholic teaching on inerrancy of Scripture and the generic "Protestant" view [...]. If this be the case, we have from the article on the Catholic position: The ...



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