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Your raise a lot of interesting points that are sources of great controversy between different Christian groups, but I'll try to focus on your question: What is an overview of the theological differences that led to distinct approaches to unwanted State innovation and overreach in the West and East? I don't think there really was much distinction ...


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It seems to me that before the Enlightenment, the predominant understanding of the structure of the universe was that the cosmos, while stratified, is unitary- that "the Heavens", which include the spheres of the stars, then of the angels, and the abode of YHWH, have substantial existence in the same way that the Earth does. When one speaks of ...


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It is my understanding that "Black Africans" are sub-saharan in origin. See: Bantu Migration Theory. Look at the appearances of ancient Egyptians and whatnot. They were not black --- they considered blacks from Nubia, the country to the south of them corresponding to the far southern Nile between Egypt and Ethiopia, to be foreigners. Carthaginians were not ...


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The woman Grapte referred to in I.2.IV of the Shepherd of Hermas is understood to have been a deaconess. The duties of deaconesses, however, are not understood to be equivalent to those of deacons, but involved, rather, ministering to widows and orphans, and perhaps helping to prepare and baptize women. The above passage is an example: You will write ...


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In the Orthodox Church, people who have practised witchcrat, or attempted to do so, are urged to confess that as a sin. Attempting to harm other people, whether by natural or "supernatural" means, is an indication of malice, which is definitely sinful, There is more detail in my article on Christian responses to witchcraft and sorcery. Someone else ...


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It goes all the way back to Genesis 29:35 at least with Leah raising her hands in praise to YHWH in naming Judah. As a Biblical Hebrew professor thinking in Hebrew, I find the Old Testament full of hand raising. After the most frequent verb for spoken praise HaLeL (Strong's #1984 & 8416), the word most translated (53 times) as "praise" is the verb YaDaH (...


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Found it in this question: What exactly did Pope Gregory the Great mean by “Universal Bishop?” Pope St. Gregory the Great, 6th century, from his epistles.


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As long as we're talking about using icons in worship and not worshiping icons: The very earliest written account of icons in general that I'm aware of comes in Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History written in the early 4th century before and during the reign of Constantine (it is regarded as the very first history of the Christian church ever written): I do ...


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I think one can easily argue that the difference is based on the division the two churches have over papal supremacy As the West felt it truly had supremacy over the whole church, it alone was aggressive in asserting power. Historically the fact that the Roman church also rose up in a government that was persecuting it, and eventually overthrew it's pagan ...



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