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15

The evidence for Paul being married is fairly scant. He writes in 1 Corinthians 9:5: "Don't we have the right to take a believing wife along with us, as do the other apostles and the Lord's brothers and Cephas?" The implication could be made that Paul was complaining about leaving some wife behind. In Galatians 1:14, Paul says: "I was advancing ...


10

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints has an official policy of not accepting any tithing from winnings having to do with gambling, this includes the lottery. Their position on gambling can be found here. For those that don't want additional information/links the position is this: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is opposed to ...


10

Update: The short answer: No; it seems that partialism is not a "real," historically defined heresy. Explanation: Before writing this post, I checked the applicable titles from among my usual textual sources -- a variety of historic theological works that are now in the public domain and available online. When that yielded no references to "partialism," I ...


10

No, he did not address the issue of slavery in any published works. We know this because of a recently published paper revealing an unpublished draft letter by Edwards that does deal with slavery. It is described by the paper author thus: It is the only known instance of Edwards writing, however abstrusely, about slavery. Also it discloses differing ...


9

Revelation 1:9 explicitly states that John was on the island of Patmos when he wrote revelation: I, John, your brother and companion in the suffering and kingdom and patient endurance that are ours in Jesus, was on the island of Patmos because of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus. That he would have been exiled there is common: "Early ...


9

There are many covenants which are recorded in the Bible. Some are made by people, some are made by God, and some are made between God and people. The terms Old Testament (Covenant) and New Testament (Covenant) are general terms which are referring to two specific covenants. The Old Testament is a term which refers to the Mosaic Covenant which was between ...


8

I like this question because it forces us to read the Westminster Confession in its context, and not just as a settled statement of belief. In summary, the two confessions are in continuity, but the earlier Scots Confession was more permissive. Especially, it did not exclude the option of episcopal polity, or of royal power over the Church. The Westminster ...


8

The TULIP acronym is intended to define the Calvinist position - however it is not intended to define that position relative to non-Christians, it is intended to define it relative to other Christians. It doesn't include doctrines that are considered basic to Christianity, or Protestantism. So you will find no emphasis on: Necessity of faith; Primacy of ...


7

Here's the List of Popes from newadvent.org, which I assume is the same list found in many US Catholic-approved Bibles, with the exception of the Papal "oppositions" listed here: 1. St. Peter (32-67) 2. St. Linus (67-76) 3. St. Anacletus (Cletus) (76-88) 4. St. Clement I (88-97) 5. St. Evaristus (97-105) 6. St. Alexander I (105-115) 7. St. Sixtus I ...


7

Origin of the phrase There are actually a number of texts that are labeled the "Nicene Creed". The text produced by the 325 council does not include information about the kingdom at all. Eusebius of Caesarea, who attended the council, wrote back to his congregation about the deliberations. He reports an initial version of the creed that was used as a ...


7

Restorationist movements imagine themselves to be "restoring" a more pristine form of Christianity, while reformed movements have their roots in the Protestant Reformation. A good example of a restorationist church are the so-called Stone-Campbell churches that had their beginnings on the American frontier and now refer to themselves as the "Restoration ...


7

No, there is not general agreement as to the exact historical accuracy of John Foxe's work. The majority of events are considered to be historical and widely accepted to be based on good sources such as eyewitness records, however doubt is often cast on the retelling aspect. The primary accusation brought against Foxe's Book of Martyrs (originally titled ...


7

This has been debated, so no one knows for sure. The consensus of the scholars seems to be that this was a malicious rumor about him, possibly started by Demetrios, the Bishop of Alexandria, a prosecutor of Origen. The Westminster Handbook to Origen states that someone who interpreted the Gospels so allegorically would be unlikely to have interpreted ...


6

Yes, this is one of many allegorical meanings attributed to the unicorn. Sometimes it seems that just about every possible meaning is attached to every possible creature, in the medieval mind. The unicorn's main associations are: power, as with any horned creature. purity: the horn was believed to have the power to magically purify water, counteract ...


6

Apollos was an Alexandrian Jew, as stated in Acts 18:24 (with following verses indicating that he knew the [Jewish] Scriptures and preached the gospel--"the way of the Lord"--but only knew "the baptism of John" before being further instructed by Priscilla and Aquila). It is possible that, like Timothy, he had a Jewish mother but a Gentile father; this ...


6

In Catholic teaching, I believe the distinction was always there, although I am sure the idea of what sexual orientation actually is has developed along with our understanding of the subject in general Like the distinction between instinctive lust/desire and indulging in it mentally or physically, so the distinction with homosexual attraction and indulging ...


6

The important thing to remember is that each of the items in TULIP was a response to the (Arminian) Remonstrants own five point rejection of Calvinism. Thus the simple reason why faith is omitted is because the Remonstrants weren't critiquing the place of faith, per se, but the place of grace in salvation. Because TULIP is a response to a critique, the ...


6

The ostiarius (or door keeper) evolved after the legalization of the church from existing Roman customs. While initially, (under church persecution) there was a need for protection from persecution, this did not become an official title until well after that need. It became fashionable, however, to adopt the roman custom. Just about any good house would ...


5

To reform is to change what already is there, and to restore is to return to its original state. It probably depends which congregation within Christianity you're asking. Some protestants may consider themselves restorationists, and others reformational. Other Christians use the term and eschew the "Protestant" label. For example, Latter-day Saints ...


5

Assuming you don't know about Congregationalism Congregationalism is a system of governance where the local church independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. It does not specify any doctrine or hierarchy, which allows for the existence of 'Methodist Congregational' churches and 'Uniting Congregational' churches. There are two major denominations ...


5

I had not previously heard that there was a debate going on about whether the Apostle Paul was married. I found an excellent resource here at Denny Burk's Blog about the subject. Mr. Burk seems to indicate that the Greek word (agamos) that Paul uses in his writings and the way in which he addresses those that are married, unmarried and virgins seems to ...


5

One could perhaps say that the dogmatic definition of papal infallibility as expressed at Vatican I is the Church's formal way of dealing with this tension. The case of Pope Honorius has of course been debated for centuries and was brought up prior to Vatican I as an argument against papal infallibility. The old Catholic Encyclopedia has a helpful summary of ...


5

Conservative pastor and OT scholar Gordon Hugenberger of Park Street Church in Boston argues that the biblical view of marriage is less formal and ceremonial than we view it today. It had more economic overtones, less romantic ones (at least at the outset), and generally speaking, engaging in sex automatically created the marital covenant. (See his ...


5

Ultimately, everybody has an agenda. Remember that "history" in the modern almost journalistic sense of the word was not really even a concept at this time. The point was not to convince "scholars" but regular people. So, who then are the contenders as "historians?" Tactitus gave us the first mention of the Christians, and provides external evidence of ...


5

The Protestant Reformation is based on, among other things, "sola scriptura"--that the Bible alone is the basis for all doctrine and practice. There are probably two essential points in this matter. The Priesthood of All Believers First, a common doctrine of Protestants is the priesthood of all believers. It is believed that there is no biblical ...


4

I'm not sure which specific councils you're referring to, but for the sake of this answer I'll assume it's the first four ecumenical councils. The Apocryphal writings were not the primary focus of these councils; doctrinal concerns were (the Trinitarian and Christological heresies). Here is a brief summary of these councils: Nicaea I (325 CE): Summoned ...


4

That is a very good question! Like you, those of us in the historic peace churches do not believe that Jesus' death can or should be avenged by violence. After all, it was Jesus himself who said that vengeance belonged to him alone. And if we were to avenge his death, who is guilty? Rather, who is not guilty? If we really believe that Jesus died for our ...


4

Nnowhere in scripture, or any Christian theology that I know of, are Christians commanded to avenge Christ's killing. In fact there is good evidence to say that God opposes it: "'Vengence is mine', sayeth the Lord". So any Christians who are taking revenge on any group because they believe them to be responsible for Jesus' death are not acting according to ...


4

Early church is not a technical term, so it can be used fairly loosely, but generally follows the history and writings of church leaders which are divided by time period into the Ante-Nicene era (prior to the council of Nicaea in 325AD) and the Nicene/Post-Nicene era, up to the scholasticism of the Middle Ages. There is no period of the church which is ...


4

From Theopedia: Typology is a method of biblical interpretation whereby an element found in the Old Testament is seen to prefigure one found in the New Testament. The initial one is called the type and the fulfillment is designated the antitype. Either type or antitype may be a person, thing, or event, but often the type is messianic and ...



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