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I think the best example is Humanae Vitae. The commission appointed to study the issue (contraception) recommended some form for married couples. And of course secular society (and most Catholics) in the 60's wanted to see contraception approved. Nevertheless, through the influence of the Holy Spirit, Paul VI reaffirmed the traditional Catholic view of ...


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Did any other philosophical systems have as much influence on the early Church as Platonism and Stoicism? When someone attempts to make Christianity into a system, it can be made to reflect or include various philosophic perspectives. More significantly you would find the imprint of a culture such as Hellenism. The derivation of catechetical schools ...


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To add to Matthew's answer regarding Neoplatonism, the early Church was also influenced by Aristotle. I should point out that Plotinus and his followers attempted a reconciliation of Plato with Aristotle, with differing degrees of success. There is, therefore, some influence of Aristotle indirectly through the Neoplatonists. However, the terminology used ...


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In the last chapter, ch. V "The Relation of the Holy Ghost to the Divine Tradition of the Faith" (pp. 210-48), of Card. Manning's The Temporal Mission of the Holy Ghost, he shows how the Holy Ghost has preserved the Church pure, comparing it to the dissolution of other sects like Protestantism. Anytime the Church convenes a dogmatic, General Council (like ...


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I think that FMS has gathered most of the Magisterial references. Perhaps an example from pastoral practice can help understand what is meant by the "law of gradualness." Suppose that someone comes to me (a priest) seeking help confidentially because he has been pilfering money from work. Clearly, that is sinful behavior (it is stealing), and must be ...


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In Familiaris Consortio, (Latin roughly translated as "of family partnership"1, but titled in English On the role of the Christian Family in the Modern World), a postsynodal Apostolic Exhortation written by Pope St. John Paul II [the Great] and given on November 22, 1981, it appears that the saintly Pope set out clarify what is 'the law of gradualness' and ...


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Gradualism might just be an -ism St. John Paul II coined (like Personalism, which I prefer). The synod document, which is just a work in progress I believe, references familiaris consortio where the word gradual is used quite a bit. I believe it is little more than the notion that individuals are on a spiritual journey and meet Christ at varying points in ...



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