Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Technically, the first ecclesiastical authority to say that heretics should be persecuted was Pope Gregory IX in 1229. The first Church Father to say that heretics should be compelled to recant would be Augustine around 400 AD. The first heretic actually put to death (385AD) was killed by the Emperor - and the Pope was very annoyed at the development. It ...


9

No, it is not true. Luther was widely read in many works of theology and church history and and if you take into consideration his commentary on various church Fathers and the merit or issues with their theology it is ridiculous to make such a claim. It is true that he was sometimes critical of their works, but he clearly used them in his own studies. ...


9

The general consensus, following Paul's teaching, seems to be that marriage is good but celibacy is better. Tertullian may have been the first to write about it: In short, there is no place at all where we read that nuptials are prohibited; of course on the ground that they are “a good thing.” What, however, is better than this “good,” we learn from ...


9

This is one of the popular misconception of trinity and incarnation. Jesus as Logos (The Word) is divine. He existed in that form for eternity in the Trinity. But the humanity of Christ did NOT exist before incarnation. Humanity of Christ consists of his human soul and body. Humans are made up of soul and body, so when Christ became human, ie., when he took ...


8

The group you're referring to is known as the Apostolic Fathers. The exact number is unknown, because some writings cannot be dated precisely. These writings we can say with some confidence are from the Apostolic Fathers: 1 Clement, a letter written by Clement of Rome, a disciple of Peter. He may also be the same Clement mentioned by Paul in Philippians ...


8

Calvin dedicates an entire Book of his Institutes (Book IV) to the Church, and Chapters 1-2 are about the "true church" in which he mentions the marks of a true church. From 4.1.9: Wherever we see the word of God sincerely preached and heard, wherever we see the sacraments administered according to the institution of Christ, there we cannot have any ...


8

The claim is false... Strictly speaking, the claim is easily proven false by searching a scripture index of the writings of the Ante-Nicene Fathers. While this particular index seems imperfect, it does show that many verses (particularly from the shorter letters) are not quoted or even referenced. We can also take advantage of the Philip Schaff ...


8

Origen was a great teacher, but he also had some non-Orthodox positions on Scripture and the faith in general. His teachings were specifically anathemitized by the Second Council of Constantinople in 1553, which inherently means you can't be a saint, since you are condemned, at least according to the Roman Catholic Church. That said, he was also an ardent ...


7

Luke 2 tells the story of Jesus as a boy in the Temple. His parents had taken Him to a feast there and had left Him behind on their return trip. When they returned to Jerusalem to find Him, Jesus asks His mother a question--"Did you not know that I must be in my Father's house?" Now, the Temple was not where Joseph lived, but was the House of God. So, ...


7

Isaiah 66:7 foretells the painless virgin birth: "she brought forth; Before her pain came, she gave birth to a boy"; So painless birth is scriptural and that is how the Catholic Church interprets it. And All the Church Fathers before AD 600 believed that Mary’s delivery was painlesssrc. But what about the pain of the women in Revelation? It can be ...


7

This has been debated, so no one knows for sure. The consensus of the scholars seems to be that this was a malicious rumor about him, possibly started by Demetrios, the Bishop of Alexandria, a prosecutor of Origen. The Westminster Handbook to Origen states that someone who interpreted the Gospels so allegorically would be unlikely to have interpreted ...


6

Historically, there have been four sources of theology: Scripture Tradition Reason Experience. This formulation goes back quite a ways. Scripture is always first, Tradition is always second, and reason and experience are a distant third and fourth. The fun comes in when one realizes that it is not possible to read Scripture without a tradition. As a ...


5

Why a canon? Why not a potato gun? Even before John died in Patmos there started to be other books which claimed to come from the Apostles or otherwise claimed to have been inspired by God. While in some cases this was not a terrible thing (some of them are quite dull, actually) others of these were wild departures from the teachings of Christ and were ...


5

Having read both of these authors, I can confidently say that Bell and Tullian are significantly different in their approaches to scripture, and in their interpretations thereof. I align myself strongly with Tullian's approach, but disagree strongly with Bell's belief. Historically speaking, Bell's theology aligns well with historical Universalism, or ...


5

The revelation was most likely simply a directive from God to go up to Jerusalem to talk with the apostles. This is the most natural way to read the verse, and there would be nothing surprising about this conclusion on the basis of the rest of Paul's life, since he was an apostle. An apostle had to be someone who had seen Christ directly with his eyes. This ...


5

I'm not sure if this is precisely what you are looking for, but your question immediately reminded me of Augustine's City of God: Chapter 35.—Of the Sons of the Church Who are Hidden Among the Wicked, and of False Christians Within the Church. Let these and similar answers (if any fuller and fitter answers can be found) be given to their enemies by ...


5

As believers in the priesthood of all believers, it is not that Baptists (and many other Protestants) reject confession per se- it's that we reject the idea that said confession must be mediated through the local priest. Ideally, we should be confessing our sins in a "small group" type setting if we are being faithful to what Luther, Calvin, et. Al ...


4

Hebrews 13:2 reminds us to show love and hospitality towards all, "for in doing so, some have entertained angels," unaware. When Samsons parents were told they were going to have a child, they too were unaware that they were in the presence of an angel, until after they sacrificed, the angel went away dramatically revealing what he was. There is nothing to ...


4

Many historians argue that Eusebius, who lived only a few decades after Origen, would have access to accurate information and no incentive to lie. Others argue that much of what Eusebius says cannot be considered historically reliable, pointing out that Origen's self-castration would conflict with Origen's theology: he interpreted Mat 18:8-9 as a command to ...


3

The conclusion of the Fathers is that these words mean the Descent into Hades. The Orthodox Icon depicts Christ raising the dead from beneath the earth (as our hymns say) which occurs eternally, that is, outside of time and at no particular time in relation to our understanding of time. Thus, to answer your question: The spirits are the dead from all time ...


3

I think the most direct Bible verse on this subject is: 1 Tim 2:5 "For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men, the Man Christ Jesus" Christians do not need any mediator besides Jesus. Specifically, we do not need a priest to stand between us and Jesus. Jesus is the mediator. We don't need a mediator to speak to the mediator. 1 ...


3

I am by no means an expert on the subject, but I think there may be a false impression that there was a big difference between these two men. The impression is caused because Cyril was involved in deposing Chrysostom at the Synod of the Oak. However, if you read carefully, it seems that Cyril was not personally against Chrysostom, but rather that Cyril (who ...


3

They certainly exist, they exist in the past, present and future. The Bible speaks of them in all three tenses to the last age of man. Do they interact with humans today? I can see no reason they would not, but it is not an absolute thing, where the Bible says this is the way it is exactly, as far as when and how they interact with men. My best guess is ...


3

It seems as early as Deuteronomy 32:6 that God is addressed as Father: Do you thus repay the LORD, you foolish and senseless people? Is not he your father, who created you, who made you and established you? Historically, it appears that (at least for people who claimed Christ) that it was gnostics that primarily held a view that God was the Father, the ...


3

The exact meaning of "free will" is greatly contested, especially as it interacts with the sovereign power and foreknowledge of God. I understand your question as seeking evidence for early Christian thought, other than in the content of the Bible itself. In the early church, several authorities wrote on the topic, in support of human freedom, including the ...


3

Greek manuscripts were written in the Greek uncial script from approximately the 3rd century BCE through the 12th century CE, and Latin manuscripts were written in the Roman majuscule script from the 7th century BCE through the 4th century CE. But even after miniscule script began being used, 'catholic church' was still rarely capitalized in the literature ...


3

Augustine wrote hundreds of letters to priests and bishops in the Church. Many of the letters are written in response to questions that he had received from them, some of which Augustine did not necessarily think were worth his time and effort, but were a burden to address, and provide responses to: ~I have not at my disposal sufficient leisure to enter ...


3

I tried to find a primary source for the claims in DickHarfield's answer. I could not find any. People are quoting and re-quoting each other (just like DickHarfield) without a primary source. Unless or Until a primary source is provided this is the best answer I could find on this topic: (These) falsehoods ... have been bandied about by devious ...


3

In the last chapter, ch. V "The Relation of the Holy Ghost to the Divine Tradition of the Faith" (pp. 210-48), of Card. Manning's The Temporal Mission of the Holy Ghost, he shows how the Holy Ghost has preserved the Church pure, comparing it to the dissolution of other sects like Protestantism. Anytime the Church convenes a dogmatic, General Council (like ...


3

"Augustine says . . . (Enchiridion lxxxiii) that 'he who dies in a state of obstinacy is guilty of the sin against the Holy Ghost,' and (De Verb. Dom., Serm. lxxi) that 'impenitence is a sin against the Holy Ghost,' and (De Serm. Dom. in Monte xxii), that 'to resist fraternal goodness with the brands of envy is to sin against the Holy Ghost,' ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible