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10

I agree with your assessment. You really answered your own question - don't do it. That's as far as the civil disobedience can go in that case - not participating yourself. Anything else (speaking out against the activity, protesting, etc) isn't civil disobedience, it's merely exercising your first amendment rights. The only way that I can see such ...


9

Christianity does not hold a "church and state must be separate" view at all; that might be part of the US constitution, but : not universal - and to all intents and purposes it is not even correct in the US, since it is quietly acknowledged that you don't stand much chance of election if you are openly non-Christian (regardless of your actual views). ...


9

It's special because the PLO is not a sovereign body, that is, it is not a national or supra-national body like other countries or the United Nations or European Union. The Sovereign Military Order of Malta is headquartered in Rome, and is "widely considered a sovereign subject of international law" [according to a quote in Wikipedia]. Although the ...


8

Can Christians be judges? Yes. We are told to judge others within the church. (1 Cor 5:12) As @CecilBeckham said, we are told not to judge people's hearts/righteounness. (Mt 7:1-2, Lk 6:37) We are also told not to be hypocritical in our judgment (Ro 2:1) Paul endorses the idea of governmental authority in Romans 13, and says Romans 13:4 (NASB) But ...


8

The Church of Scotland is not a state church. It is recognised as "national church", but it is independent of the state in matters spiritual. The Church of Scotland and the Church of England have very different histories - it is not a question of one trying to imitate the other. The Scottish Reformation of 1560 took place when Scotland was still a separate ...


8

Some people use Mark 12:17 towards this goal. 17 And Jesus answering said unto them, "Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's." And they marvelled at him. The argument goes something like this: The government is here to govern the society here on Earth. God has been given to us to govern our hearts, ...


7

I think this article should help: The Bible does not articulate a full-blown doctrine of the separation of church and state. Yet, its seeds are clearly present. Jesus at least foreshadowed the concept when he said “[g]ive therefore to the emperor things that are the emperor’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” (Matthew 22:21) Jesus’ behavior was ...


5

1 Corinthians 5:9-13 seems to tell Christians not to use man-made laws to force non-believers to live or behave according to Christian beliefs. Instead, it tells them to disassociate themselves with those WITHIN THE CHURCH who behave immorally, and to leave those outside the church to God's judgment. 1 Corinthians 5:9-13 King James Version (KJV) 9 ...


4

The command you quote is from thee different Gospels: Matthew 7:1 Judge not, that ye be not judged. Luke 6:37 Judge not, and ye shall not be judged: condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned: forgive, and ye shall be forgiven: John 7:24 Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment. In each of these cases the ...


4

Richard's answer isn't really teaching for separation of church and state, but rather evidence against fighting it. It shows we are to obey the authorities, but it doesn't say the government cannot be a specific religion. Jesus never taught to keep it separated (that is recorded at least), so it cannot be taken as doctrine. At the same time, he also never ...


4

Some Baptists and most Anabaptists preach a strict separation of church and state. Historically, this has precluded many from any type of government involvement. Mennonites and the Amish, for example, in being called out of the world, believe they should have nothing to do with elected or high office.


4

Regarding belief, the Church of Scotland is entirely independent of the state in matters spiritual (and is a "national church" not a state church). Regarding practices, the call to be a "national church" means a self-understanding not to neglect areas of the country which are less prosperous or populous. The Church of Scotland is struggling to maintain a ...


4

For Evangelicals*, the seminal work on this very question is Kingdoms In Conflict by Chuck Colson. (Note, the book has been since released for those unable to handle anything less than a summary in its title, as God and Government: An Insider's View on the Boundaries between Faith and Politics.) Chuck Colson - special assistant to President Nixon during ...


4

This is an interesting question. Bear with me as I attempt to build a bit of Confessional background to my answer. It's clear from Article 5 of the Augsburg Confession that the office of the ministry was instituted by God to preach the Gospel and administer the Sacraments (http://bookofconcord.org/augsburgconfession.php#article5). This is God's "Right ...


3

"Submit" in this passage doesn't mean "behave as a doormat" or "never speak critically of". It means don't rebel. If your "human authority" allows you to take an active part in public discourse, to campaign, to try to influence your fellow voters (which democracies of course do, for people of all faiths or none) this passage doesn't prevent people doing it. ...


3

According to Canon Law, Catholic priests cannot hold public office. Canon 284.3 §3. Clerics are forbidden to assume public offices which entail a participation in the exercise of civil power. But anyone else can and should participate to the best of their ability. Although members of religious orders would be subject to their superiors who would ...


3

The separation of church and state is a "Baptist Distinctive" but is not commonly held across the remainder of the Christian spectrum. To wit: The state church of England is the Church of England (Anglican). The state church of Scotland is the Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) Most Orthodox denominations (Russian, Armenian, Ethopian) have specific ...


3

There are in fact different concepts that emerged in christianity during the ages. Early christians that lived under pagan emperors were taught by Saint Paul to respect civil authorities and pray for them so they come to truth. When the persecutions ended and emperors accepted christianity, there was a temptation to accept millenarist view that Rome ...


2

When Pilate asked Jesus about the accusations made against him, that he was calling himself the King of the Jews (and thus implicitly threatening Roman rule), Jesus told him that "My kingdom is not of this world." (John 18:36) Also, consider one of the rhetorical traps the Pharisees laid for him: Matthew 22: 15-21 15 Then went the Pharisees, and ...


2

Interpretation of @Richard's previous answer aside I know of nothing in the New Testament that either endorses or condemns the concept of the separation of church and state. However, in Romans Paul instructs Christians to submit to the authorities that we are subject to. Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no ...


1

In the course of listening to White Horse Inn broadcasts I've consistently heard the participants refer back to John Calvin when commenting on Two Kingdom Theology. I think it very useful to look at how Mike Horton treats Cavlin's comments on the Two Kingdoms in his recent book on Calvin. If we assume that Horton is in agreement with Calvin, then I think ...



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