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“Nature” and “Person” are theological concepts that date back as far as the great Trinitarian and Christological debates of the fourth and fifth centuries (enduring at least until the Second Council of Constantinople in 553. These concepts were discussed in Greek; in that language, the terms employed were φύσις (physis, nature) or οὐσία (ousia, essence or ...


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Here goes my own answer. Definition of person Adopting the definition of person by Boethius: "an individual substance of a rational nature", St. Thomas Aquinas refines it by stating that: "the individual substance, which is included in the definition of a person, implies a complete substance subsisting of itself and separate from all else (substantia ...


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why or how is it that Jesus' human nature is not a human person? Jesus does not assume an already-existing human person, as though there was a "human-only Jesus" before the Incarnation and a "human+divine Jesus" after the incarnation, with the "human-only Jesus" disappearing. St. Thomas Aquinas refutes this in Summa Theologica III q. 4 a. 2 ("Whether the ...


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Introduction In language, words convey a meaning or idea. Much like the word Trinity conveys a theological concept that most protestants believe is found in scripture, the word "Trinity" itself is never found. This word was coined to describe an idea which previously had no accurate descriptor. Similarly, while the word ὁμοούσιος (homooúsios) which means ...


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The teaching that Jesus Christ is "of same substance with the Father" is evident in the Bible. Pauline Witness Galatians 4:8, Romans 1:20 and Acts 17:29 all spoke of God's nature (divinity) and in Colossians 2:9, Jesus is said to be having God's very own nature in his bodily existence. For the entire fullness of God's nature dwells bodily in Christ, ...


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Okay, thanks to @KorvinStarmast's comment, the following shows that the reason that they chose this unscriptural term is that they could not find a single term in scripture that said what they wanted it to say: http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/nicea1.txt EXCURSUS ON THE WORD HOMOUSIOS.(4) The Fathers of the Council at Nice were at one time ...



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