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Exodus 12:46 and Numbers 9:12 talk of the Passover lamb, of which no bone shall be broken. Before deciding whether the decision not to break Jesus' legs to hasten death was really in fulfilment of these as prophecies, it is useful to discover whether this might have been a common occurrence. John Dominic Crossan says in The Birth of Christianity, pages ...


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In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. There was a man sent ...


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Historically there are two options: There is only one Logos, both Christ and Scripture are one in nature. But this lead to a problematic question, How Christians explain their belief that Christ is worshiped and Scripture is not while both are identical in nature as God's singular Word? Matt Gutting in a chat room discussion refer to Catechism of Catholic ...


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The incarnate word of God is a person named Jesus. The written word of God, inspired by the Spirit, is generally identified as a book named the Bible. There are debates over what should be considered inspired, but there's also a common core. They seem to me to have completely different natures, and so are very easy to distinguish.


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Admittedly I'm reporting mostly silence, but my copy of "Heresies" by Harold O. J. Brown mentions aphthartodocetism on page 185. He does not, however, mention anything about Justinian or any other emperor adhering to this doctrine. According to him: If monophysitism had not gone beyond Severus [presumably Severus of Antioch], it would at most have been ...


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Since I was the OP of the original question I believe the following is a partial answer.First of all, I totally disagree with the frequent denial of historical Jesus. The answer of @the dark wanderer, "the most common answer to your question is that what you have found is just another Biblical indication of The Mystery of Faith (i.e. the Trinity)", ...


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The most common answer to your question is that the what you have found is just another Biblical indication of The Mystery of Faith (i.e. the Trinity). The old testament verse from Numbers indicates that God the Father Almighty is distinct from God the Son. Indeed, "God becoming truly man while remaining fully God" is a common component of short statements ...


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The Augustinian tradition, going back to the early anti-Pelagian writing On Nature and Grace, distinguishes between the human nature and the defect of original sin. We have a defective nature, therefore, and that is what we pass on to our children, but Christ is still consubstantial with us even though He was always without sin. Sin is not part of human ...


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The earlier fathers did sometimes make statements that later came to be recognized as formally heretical. But since no one called them on those statements during their lifetimes, we didn't get to see the debate play out. They didn't have a chance to say, "Oh yeah... good point," and explain, revise or qualify their statements. And on the negative side, they ...


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Christ's relics on earth be them fake or real is up for a big debate however most of the relics are blood group AB even the statues that cry blood have come back testing as blood group ab. Cnn's special on finding Jesus surprinsingly left this out however it did reference at the very end that the sodarium and the shroud tested blood came back both the same ...


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Pelagianism isn't a Christology, and "the perfect humanity of Christ is united to the Logos" isn't a Nestorian position as stated. The argument linking the two was that Nestorianism is the Christology that naturally fits with Pelagian Anthropology and Soteriology. That's not something that any of the major Pelagians or Nestorian thinkers said, though; that ...


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Thanks to Adithia for a stimulating question, and Mr. Bultitude for a thorough and impressive reply. It seems to me that the Calvinists resolutely deny that there were two personae or prosopa in Christ, but still end up with two hypostases in that they treat the natures as acting subjects. This seems to me to be a weakness of the Western Aristotelian ...


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The greatest cause of confusion, and a progenitor of heresy in our Orthodox faith, is trying to describe eternal concepts using thinking and expression born in an existential experience bounded by the limits of time and space. For example, and the texts above are rife with these, when Jesse writes, "Christ's soul would have existed prior to the incarnation." ...


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No, Calvin was not Nestorian. This can be concluded on the strength of the following evidence: His defense of the Chalcedonian Definition and rejection of Nestorius Related to the above, reformed theology's rejection of icons of Christ on the basis of the unity of the natures His implicit acceptance of the reality described in the term theotokos, and his ...


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First of all, there was no Arianism prior to Arius because Arianism started with Arius.Arius began to teach a new teaching. He taught that the Logos had a beginning of existence.Although some scholars like Alexander Vasiliev refers to Lucian as the Arius before Arius.This merely shows that Lucian hold onto a proto-Arianism (source). Arius was condemned ...


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The Church's official view is that this sure is an important question, and you should probably go try and come closer to the truth of it through prayer, fasting, and participation in the Church. The most common verbalized approximation to an answer to this question is that Christ is both Fully God and Fully Man, but this, the Church confesses, is a poor ...



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