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31

For the quick answer to your question, see John 1:1, 14. But really, this is a simple matter of the transitive property. Jesus forgives sin (Mark 2:1-12): It's a non-debated point of doctrine that only God can forgive sins. It's easy for the modern reader to marvel at the miracle without realizing the greater significance of Jesus' statement. Jesus here ...


21

Yes, you're absolutely right! Jesus never broke any bones. That's a fulfillment of the prophecy from Old Testament and it's written about in John. John 19:36 (NIV) These things happened so that the scripture would be fulfilled: “Not one of his bones will be broken," The prophecy that John refers to is found in Psalms 34:20: Psalms 34:19-20 ...


12

The problem that you run into is John 1 - in which it says of Jesus, that by him all things were made, and there is nothing that was made that He didn't make. This is why the Nicene Creed is so careful to say he was begotten not made. If God the Father made Jesus, then John made a boo-boo. The incarnation, on the other hand, is merely putting flesh to that ...


10

Hebrews 10:1 (KJV) For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect. I think you can say from Hebrews 10 that the Old Testament sacrifices were a picture of Christ's sacrifice more than that his death ...


10

The chapter below is titled "The Government of the Promised Son" and seems to answer your question regarding Jesus, the Son, being God. Isaiah 9:6 "For unto us a Child is born, Unto us a Son is given; And the government will be upon His shoulder. And the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty ...


10

Immanuel is a title that means "God with us". Some people have suggested that since Jesus was named "Jesus", then "Immanuel" does not refer to Him. This is akin to claiming that the titles "King of Kings" and "Lord of Lords" don't apply to Jesus, because He was named "Jesus" and not "King of Kings" or "Lord of Lords". God the Son, the Second Person of the ...


10

The classic book on this subject is The Humor of Christ by Elton Trueblood. While it is true that the Scripture rarely tells Jesus' emotion, there are considerable places in Scripture where Jesus is most likely making a joke: When the Syrophoenician woman quips back that even the dogs get the crumbs When the Pharisees strain out the gnats but swallow a ...


9

Christomonism is the heresy of identifying Christ as the singular representation of God. It is a heresy because it denies the Trinity, which has been the traditional foundation of orthodoxy. Douglas John Hall writes: Christomonism and the exclusivity that attends it represents, I believe, a failure of trinitarian theology. For a triune understanding ...


9

Luke 10:21 On that same occasion Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and intelligent, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for this was your gracious will. Here Jesus is rejoicing in the wisdom, and beauty, and grace of God, and ...


9

Unitarian Subordinationism - Sometimes simply called "Subordinationism," it is thought that this view may have actually been the dominant view of the Eastern Fathers until the Arian controversy. (Including Origen, Eusebius and other famous thinkers). In this view, Jesus is seen as co-eternal and co-creator alongside the Father. One may even say He is ...


8

The Arians were very good at using the same (Biblical) language as orthodox Christians, but meaning entirely different things by them. The language in the Creed had to be so specific that it removes all wiggle room. I think I can hear, in the creed, the frustration of someone so upset with Arian double-speak that they pound orthodoxy home with some ...


8

On the contrary, mainstream Christianity has held that the human and divine natures of Christ are not separable. A key point was the third ecumenical council, held at Ephesus in 431 in order to resolve disagreements between Nestorius, the Patriarch of Constantinople, and Cyril, the Patriarch of Alexandria. Nestorius wanted to make a distinction between ...


8

I think there is an assumption behind your question that is not quite right, regarding the Christian conception of "the Messiah". As David Stratton shows in his answer, the Messiah concept is originally Jewish, and Christians believe that Jesus is that very same Messiah, and the fulfilment of various prophecies. But bear in mind that most Christians ...


8

You are confusing titles with proper names. Yesh'ua (Heb.) is rendered "Jesus" or "Joshua" today. It is his given name. It means "Jehovah Saves." Christos (Greek) is a title translating the Hebrew "Messiah" or "Annointed One." It highlights his annointed and special status. Immanuel (Heb.) is a simple Hebrew construction that says "God is with us." It is ...


8

For Christians that are creationists, and that accept the doctrine of the Trinity, yes. From CARM.org, which believes and advocates both doctrines. The idea that Jesus is Creator is one of the arguments to support that Jesus is God. * CARM is not alone in this belief, but I decided to link to only one reference. To anyone who rejects the idea of ...


8

Approximately 97% of Christians belong to Trinitarian denominations, so it's a reasonable view that there are no other prominent Christologies at all. However let's ignore that argument, and consider the most prominent ones after excluding Trinitarianism. Most of them are associated with specific denominations. For example the Latter-Day Saints and the ...


7

IMHO, Christians find way too many "types of Christ" in the Old Testament. Sure, there are some similarities between the death of Absalom and the death of Christ. But they're pretty strained. Yes, both of their deaths involved a tree and a spear. Both were called "son of David". But there are huge differences. Like: Absalom was guilty; Jesus was innocent. ...


7

In 1 Timothy 1:12-17, Paul - or someone writing as him - says (NRSV translation): I am grateful to Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, because he judged me faithful and appointed me to his service, even though I was formerly a blasphemer, a persecutor, and a man of violence. But I received mercy because I had acted ignorantly in unbelief, and ...


6

Christ as community (ecclesiocentric) In his dissertation "Sanctorum Communio" (1927), christology and ecclesiology do basically conincide. Christ is "existing as community" ("Christus als Gemeinde existierend"). The mediator and center0: christocentric alteration Christ and the world. In Bonhoeffer theology since his "christology" lecture (1933), the ...


6

In historical Christian belief (of almost any type), it would be considered heresy to say that God the Son was created. You can use a neat term here "nicene christianity". Regarding your question - Christ has a complete human nature (human body and human soul) and this nature is created. Christ has accepted our nature with all sinless weaknesses of ...


6

You are conflating, I think, the manner and location of the shedding of the blood with the fact of the shedding of the blood. Put simply, Jesus was the perfect spotless Lamb of God whose blood is shed for the remission of sins; there was no requirement that his blood be shed on the Jewish altar. Consider the archetype of this sacrifice in God's command to ...


6

I'd imagine that would be a heresy of the heresy of modalism or arianism or something, but that's not a very precise answer since a heresy of a heresy could be anything. So, if you want to identify a heresy to the doctrine of the incarnation it would have to deny that Mary is the Holy Mother of God. The heresy that denied that was Nestorianism. You can ...


6

A messiah is a saviour or liberator of a people in the Abrahamic religions. From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Messiah Mes·si·ah [mi-sahy-uh] noun 1 the promised and expected deliverer of the Jewish people. 2 Jesus Christ, regarded by Christians as fulfilling this promise and expectation. John 4:25, 26. 3 ( usually lowercase ) ...


6

I'll try to answer this from several different views - the main three (Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox) and also the LDS view, since the LDS view is significantly different from the other three, and deserves a distinct treatment. The mainstream Christian view (Protestant, Orthodox, Catholic) is covered by Apologetics Press in this article: What Does it ...


6

The Wikipedia article on Monophysitisism answers your question when it says: There are two major doctrines that can indisputably be called "monophysite": Eutychianism holds that the human and divine natures of Christ were fused into one new single (mono) nature: His human nature was "dissolved like a drop of honey in the sea". Apollinarism or ...


5

I don't believe that would be heresy at all. Jesus, being fully human and fully God is the only one qualified to act as high priest for the church - the go-between between God and man. He's qualified because he was tempted in every way, but was without sin. At least this is my understanding, and I tend to be pretty conservative when it comes to my ...


5

Only Jehovah is God; Jesus Christ is Michael the archangel. He is different from the other angels in that he was the first one created. They quote the following verse to prove that he is Michael: 1 Thessalonians 4:14 For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, ...


5

The theological term for what you are describing is called Kenosis- from "an emptying." As you suggest, Philippians 2, in which the Scripture says that "though He was God, he thought equality with God was not something to be grasped," so he emptied himself and became obedient unto death, even the death on a Cross. That God himself would choose to empty ...


5

Upvote for a good question. I do not agree that an answer to your question involves mere opinion. The answer is yes, and the scriptural basis for that affirmative answer is both broad and deep. While the assumption that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are one in their divine nature is not required in order to understand how the Christ knew "well beforehand" ...



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