Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Tolkien always denied that The Lord of the Rings was an allegory, let alone a Christian allegory. While many people have searched for Christian symbolism, the author did not intend that there should be any. Specifically there is no character who corresponds to Christ. There are of course strong themes of good and evil, of destiny and of guiding and creating ...


3

In western culture, Red is the color of passion and it's disordered vice of lust is cooped up in the color. (see also, the Scarlet letter). I see the esteemed Revered V says the sin is pride. I don't disagree, I just think the real sin that is being covered here is lust and not pride. Karen has a disordered desire to dance and be seen when she should stand ...


3

I can't point to a particular chapter but the entire book is written as if the author rejects predestination in the Calvinist sense. (Meaning irresistible grace) The entirety of the book is written as if our choices matter - as if we have a choice. Based on that, I'd say that the book does take a position opposed to predestination in that sense, but I ...


2

While Tolkien made the statement that there was no implied allegory in LOTR, I did pick up the following things: LOTR can be read as an allegory of WW2. LOTR can be read as an allegory of the industrial revolution of the West (Saruman's "mind of metal and wheels", the endless smoke from Mount Doom) and all the evil it entails for rural man (the hobbits). ...


2

Frodo's self-sacrificial trip to Mount Doom to "destroy power" has allegorical similarities to Christ's incarnation and "descent to Hell".


2

Here is an argument in favor of Pilgrim's Progress supporting predestination. The names of the characters defines their behavior. Faith, Christian, and Hopeful made it to the heavenly kingdom. Timid, Athiest, Ignorance: not so much. Furthermore, characters do not change their name. [For example, there is, afaik, not a section which details how ...


1

I imagine that two important principles would be violated if Mr. McIan's philosophy were taken to its logical extreme: Free Will (and thereby the loss of Love) Religious Liberty (or liberty of conscience) 1) In a world were no evil could take place, even in principle, there would be no place for truly freely given Love: which is to say, there would be ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible