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22

Before we start to answer this, a little history is needed. Both the Latter-Day Saints and Jehovah's Witnesses are Restorationist churches. That means that they were founded on the belief that all the other churches in the world had ceased to hold to the whole correct Christian doctrine, and that a direct revelation from God to the founders caused them to ...


15

Of course Jesus never called himself a Christian! The term "Christian" is generally understood to mean a follower of Christ. Jesus wasn't a follower of Christ, he was the Christ. When it comes to modern usage in the greater culture, things get complicated. The term "Christian" is not trademarked. Linguistically, no group has more right than another to use ...


12

There is no consensus among Christians on this question. Assuming that the conversion is genuine and permanent, rather than momentary weakness, the three main schools of thought that apply to this issue are: Conditional Security According to this view, Christians can lose their salvation. Thus, a Christian who converted to another religion would be seen ...


10

While it's not always the most reliable source for knowledge, a quick trip to Wikipedia's article on Transcendental Meditation gets us a bit of well-referenced history on the whole Transcendental Meditation movement. Included in the article is this: In the 1950s, the Transcendental Meditation movement was presented as a religious organization. The ...


9

A fundamental issue here is that the term "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons). To use "Christian" in a narrower ...


9

I want to preface the rest of this with the statement that I am merely answering the question. I am not saying whether mainstream Christians are right or wrong in their position. But I am going to answer exactly the question by showing why they classify these two groups as non-Christians and backing it up with references. The Basis: I'm going to ...


9

There are many covenants which are recorded in the Bible. Some are made by people, some are made by God, and some are made between God and people. The terms Old Testament (Covenant) and New Testament (Covenant) are general terms which are referring to two specific covenants. The Old Testament is a term which refers to the Mosaic Covenant which was between ...


8

This may be redundant, but from a Sola Scriptura/Biblical Literalist/Protestant/Evangelical/Fundamentalist view... Is Christianity defined by the Bible? If so, is belief in the Bible the most important (or foundational) belief in Christianity? Is it the basis of Christianity? Yes. Christianity is the faith in the God of the Bible. ...


7

Tolerant of what? "Tolerance" is one of those words that people overuse yet never define. It generally carries the assumption that a person is only as good/strong/important as his ideas - if you reject a person's idea, you must be rejecting that person as well. You believe that the entire population of this planet with the exception of those who share ...


6

For starters, nobody was really a follower of Christ, as such, until he was about 30 years old (sometime from 27 to 30 AD or so). At that point, Jesus began teaching in the synagogues and healing in public places. We read about his first followers in several places, including: On one occasion, while the crowd was pressing in on him to hear the word of ...


6

No. Everyone in my local Church self-describes as fundamentalist, and we live like normal folk in cities, suburbs, farms, our own houses, apartments, underground survival bunkers with automated home defenses, abandoned missle silos, trees, caves, and just about anywhere else normal people live. Just joking about the last four on that list... Our group ...


5

The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch. (Acts 11:26, NIV) Therefore, a Christian is a "disciple" of Christ. And a "disciple" of Christ is one who "believes Jesus and abide in his word" (John 8:31). Therefore, one who does not believe Jesus or does not abide in the word of Jesus is not a "disciple" of Christian and not a Christian.


5

This is a pretty broad question, and you have to understand that there are varying views within Christianity. There's no one, single understanding, but here is a fairly comprehensive list. Assume in this list that it applies to most groups within Christianity unless otherwise noted. I'm going to ignore such groups a s "Christian Atheists" (Who would ...


5

The word Christian implies a follower of Christ. In fact: '"Christian" derives from the Koine Greek word Christ, a translation of the Biblical Hebrew term Messiah.'(source) and 'The Greek word Χριστιανός (Christianos)—meaning "follower of Christ"—comes from Χριστός (Christos)—meaning "anointed one"' (from the same source). At the time of Christ all of His ...


5

I know for a fact that the Catholic Church does not recognize those who do not baptize in the proper form and matter as Christians. Thus the Catholic Church does not recognize the validity of groups such as Mormons or Jehovahs Witness (although I don't think the Jehovah's witness consider themselves Christian to begin with) The Catechism of the Catholic ...


4

Was Christianity "created" with Jesus? Yes. At the time of Christ, there were several sects / parties / schools of Judaism - the Essenes, the Zealots, the Saducees, the Pharisees, and other splinter groups. These groups were as highly divided as say, Catholics and Baptists are today. With the destruction of the Temple, only the Pharisee Movement ...


4

Let me paraphrase an answer I heard from John Sentamu, the Archbishop of York, on virtually this topic, at a public lecture a few years ago. Any errors in this account are due to me, though. You asked for a Protestant perspective and I believe this counts; it is not the only Protestant perspective and perhaps some non-Protestants would also agree with it. ...


4

First, there is a framework in the Bible to help believers identify themselves as being ‘genuine’ or not. However, although this framework is infallible to guide the elect into an 'assurance of salvation' it provides no reliable means to an unbeliever. A wicked soul can and will deceive themselves as part of the curse they are under. Secondly, this framework ...


3

[Protestant perspective] When it comes to faith, belief and dogma, Christianity is not tolerant at all. Christianity will never agree that the belief and philosophies of other religions are true, unless there is a common ground. For instance, a Hindu has no problem to accept that Jesus is the Son of God. A Hindu will gladly include Jesus to the existing ...


3

The Bible has no definition for who is a Christian. The term 'Christian' was first used in Antioch in the first century. It is more likely that the people in Antioch called the followers of the new faith as 'Christians' to identify them. The Greek word Χριστιανός (Christianos) simply means "follower of Christ". The term was created by pagans and it has no ...


3

About meditation in general, I can recommend you Ascent to Mount Carmel by saint John of the Cross, a famous 16th century mystic. It's not an easy reading, but it's a good guidebook of Christian mysticism. Along with few things that are good to do, author warns against many dangers in spiritual life, which may seem marginal in the beginning but may lead you ...


3

Is Christianity defined by the Bible? No. If not, what is it exactly that makes a person a "Christian"? (Can an Atheist call himself a Christian and be counted as a Christian?) Christianity is defined by belief in the Nicene Creed. Here is one version. We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all that is, ...


3

The Christian God is given a wide range of names in both the Old Testament and the New Testament. My first thought was to clarify with a generational phrase. You might say "The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob," but that might confuse you with Jews. Also, Since "Allah" is the usual translation for "God" you would risk offending Muslims and breaking the law. ...


2

The question here hinges on whose definition of "Christianity" is used. We could use a Reformed definition, an Arminian definition, a Roman Catholic definition, an Eastern Orthodox definition... or maybe an Anglican, or Episcopalian definition... how about the Pentecostals? The criteria for those are described fairly clearly. We could also use definitions ...


2

Any individual or group can have their own line of thinking and say we are so and so. They can say that we believe in Jesus, yet we are not Christians. Nobody can prevent them from doing so. They however cannot force Mainstream Christianity (or Chalcedon) to accept their heretical line of thinking. Mainstream Christianity is recognised to be wielding an ...


2

The Apostle John addresses this issue in his first epistle: They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us. But they went out, that it might become plain that they all are not of us. 1 John 2:19 ESV This teaches that those who leave [Christianity] were never really Christians.


2

If we were perfect, our every thought would have it's foundation in God. What I mean is, if you "dive deep" into your thoughts, or even try to "empty" yourself, God becomes everything. Not that I have ever been able to do that very well, but the deeper you go, the more you as a Christian will find God. So to answer your question, go for it, but your aim ...


2

Here is an example of tolerance in the bible: 1 Cor. 9:19-23 NIV For though I be free from all men, yet have I made myself servant unto all, that I might gain the more. And unto the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law; To them that are ...


2

I think Mawia has a good foundational answer. Regarding your good point about the Crusades, Catholic persecution, dark ages, etc... We need to remember that Jesus said "Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me in that day, ‘Lord, Lord, have ...


2

This is an interesting question, indeed. The person you quote finds Christianity to be "intolerable", while Christianity is completely tolerable of other opinions and beliefs, as you defined tolerance. Christianity does not impose its beliefs on others nor does it vilify people that reject Christianity. However, the person quoted does vilify Christians. ...



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