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6

Yes: the Catechism provides explicit guidance on this matter, and it's covered in Canon Law. The sacrament of Baptism is conferred "in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."85 In Baptism, the Lord's name sanctifies man, and the Christian receives his name in the Church. This can be the name of a saint, that is, of a disciple ...


4

Thomas Aquinas hypothesised that a merciful God would not consign innocent babies who died without being purged of Original Sin through baptism, to hell. Aquinas said these innocents must dwell in limbo, a place between heaven and hell, alongside virtuous but unbaptised pagans such as Plato and Moses, born before Jesus had come to explain things. Thus limbo ...


2

What is the biblical basis for the belief that people must have children? I remember reading in a magazine once years ago that people in poor countries had lots of children because that was their investment in the future, sort of their retirement program. They contrasted this with people in wealthy countries who have few children because the productive ...


2

It's not clear that there is any sense in which we created beings can "know" God's plan—for the universe, or for any being or group of beings. What we can know generally is that God wills good, and salvation, for all beings: God, who "dwells in unapproachable light," [cf. 1 Timothy 6:16] wants to communicate his own divine life to the men he freely ...


2

This question is very close to a pastoral advice question (which would make it off-topic) but I think it can be answered adequately. Breaking a promise would, to my knowledge, be regarded as sinful by all the branches of Christianity. This is why the Bible exhorts us to be wise, and to avoid making vows and oaths (James 5:12). With the possible exception ...


1

While some of the advice given above is similar to current canon law on these matters, not all of it is the same. The Roman Ritual from 1964 DOES NOT reflect current Church law, but apparently summarizes the 1917 Code of Canon Law. It is a head scratcher why it would be used as a source to respond to this questioner. What is relevant is the 1984 Code of ...


1

No. What is said during the Sacrament of Penance, must be secret and it's inviolable. The Seal of Confession must not be violated, no matter how serious is the fault, not even if it could save another life. The priest cannot disclose anything that is said during a Penance, directly or indirectly. To make an extreme example, if a man, during the Penance, ...



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