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8

It is in D&C 68:25–27, a revelation Joseph Smith received in November 1831, that this doctrine is outlined with the age of eight years old specified: 25 And again, inasmuch as parents have children in Zion, or in any of her stakes which are organized, that teach them not to understand the doctrine of repentance, faith in Christ the Son of the living ...


6

Yes: the Catechism provides explicit guidance on this matter, and it's covered in Canon Law. The sacrament of Baptism is conferred "in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."85 In Baptism, the Lord's name sanctifies man, and the Christian receives his name in the Church. This can be the name of a saint, that is, of a disciple ...


2

For Catholics, one can read from the Catechism paragraphs 328-336. In terms of a guardian angel, we read the following, showing the Catholic Church believes children do not lose their angels: 336 From infancy to death human life is surrounded by their watchful care and intercession. [Cf. Mt 18:10; Lk 16:22; Pss 34:7; 91:10-13; Job 33:23-24; Zech 1:12; ...


2

This question is very close to a pastoral advice question (which would make it off-topic) but I think it can be answered adequately. Breaking a promise would, to my knowledge, be regarded as sinful by all the branches of Christianity. This is why the Bible exhorts us to be wise, and to avoid making vows and oaths (James 5:12). With the possible exception ...


1

Roman Catholics call the doctrine you refer to as age of accountability the age of reason, for it is our reason and knowledge of mortal sin that thereby makes us accountable to it. Borrowing from the Catechism: Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God's ...


1

The Church of God by Faith (not sure if there is a distinction like there is between Churches of Christ) does officially hold to original sin. However, many individual members of all denominations have *'s on that doctrine, if not outright reject it. One of the *'s being an age of accountability that you mentioned, before which salvation is given without ...


1

While some of the advice given above is similar to current canon law on these matters, not all of it is the same. The Roman Ritual from 1964 DOES NOT reflect current Church law, but apparently summarizes the 1917 Code of Canon Law. It is a head scratcher why it would be used as a source to respond to this questioner. What is relevant is the 1984 Code of ...


1

No. What is said during the Sacrament of Penance, must be secret and it's inviolable. The Seal of Confession must not be violated, no matter how serious is the fault, not even if it could save another life. The priest cannot disclose anything that is said during a Penance, directly or indirectly. To make an extreme example, if a man, during the Penance, ...



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