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13

The Latin text of the Symbolum Apostolicum ("Apostles' Creed") states, Credo in Deum Patrem omnipoténtem, Creatórem cæli et terræ, et in Iesum Christum, Fílium Eius unicum, Dóminum nostrum, qui concéptus est de Spíritu Sancto, natus ex Maria Virgine, passus sub Póntio Piláto, crucifixus, mórtuus, et sepúltus, descéndit ad ínferos, tértia die resurréxit a ...


10

At least the Roman Catholic and Presbyterian churches do. A fairly comprehensive list is available on the wikipedia article. As to the why, at least from the Presbyterian perspective, children of saints are viewed as being born into a covenantal relationship in similar vein to the males of ancient Israel being required to be circumcised. Fuller ...


9

The two are not contradictory at all. The common understanding is that Jesus is unique and the only begotten son of God. The rest of us are heirs to God - children of God via adoption. From Adopted Children of God The term “Son of God” refers preeminently to Jesus Christ’s deity (Matt. 11:25-27; 16:16-17). He alone is one in substance and glory ...


9

Short Answer: Yes. Just as a person can honor God without getting married, a couple can honor God without having children. From a Biblical perspective, Paul's advice in 1 Corinthians 7:17-35 is highly relevant: Only, as the Lord has assigned to each one, as God has called each, in this manner let him walk. . . . Was any man called when he was already ...


9

The Wikipedia article on the subject is very thorough. Most Christians practise infant baptism. Denominations that practise infant baptism include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, Armenian Apostolic Church, Assyrian Church of the East, the Anglican churches, Lutherans, Presbyterians, Methodists, some Church of ...


8

In order to give any meaningful answer, we must first assume the existence of free will. Otherwise, the question is moot; children are simply doing what has been predestined that they will do. But if we understand that free will is given to everyone, including children, then it's fairly easy to answer. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus explained that sin ...


8

Great question! There are so many things about this verse that are so awesome. I would propose Jesus' answer has a two-fold answer. Part 1 First, Jesus says that we will not enter the kingdom of heaven unless we become like a child. We need to change our mindset and think like children think. Not that we become immature and act childish in the traditional ...


8

Within the Confessional Canon Law specifically and absolutely forbids the priest from divulging anything sacramentally confessed (Can 983). That said, and notwithstanding Canon 980, it would be possible for a priest to withhold absolution from a penitent until she has reported any crime to the authorities herself. The priest may legitimately have doubts ...


7

Disclaimer I have been studying the book of Revelation, and haven't looked at OT for a long time. Thus, if I mis-remembered the story of Eli, please correct me. Thanks! Answer Jeremiah 31:30 But everyone shall die for his own iniquity: every man that eats the sour grape, his teeth shall be set on edge. This does not say "die for parents of ...


7

Typically, the most prominent example of how "men should have authority over women" stems from Ephesians 5:22, in which Paul admonishes wives to submit to their husbands. That said, a contextual reading will bear much fruit: 21 submitting to one another out of reverence for Christ. 22 Wives, submit to your own husbands, as to the Lord. 23 For the ...


7

The Roman Ritual prescribes 24. An infant of infidel parents may be baptized lawfully even though the parents are opposed, provided that its life is in such danger that one can reasonably foresee it may die before attaining the use of reason. Outside the case of danger of death, it may lawfully be baptized, provided its Catholic rearing is ...


6

What is the disadvantage of being illegitimate in the eyes of the Church? That is to say, what is the burden of illegitimacy today? As far as I can see in the Canons and the Catechism, there is no disadvantage or burden. I can find nowhere in either where it says that the sacraments are to be denied the illegitimate. This might be expected: Canon Law ...


5

Tell them about St. Nicholas the Bishop of Myra and then tell them that it's an old tradition. Then have more traditions so this one tradition doesn't end up being the only thing they remember from their childhood.


5

Perhaps the question really is, "Should I lie to my children?" or "Should I lie?" The answer to both of those is, of course, "No." Certainly it is culturally normative to tell children about Santa. However, right and wrong in Christianity are not determined by how acceptable it is to a culture. My parents told me the gifts were from them, and I ...


5

This response addresses the question from a Reformed perspective, informed by concepts such as monergistic regeneration and sola gratia. The Westminster Assembly, in the Confession (quoted below), taught that the elect were chosen by God "before the foundations of the earth." Regarding your question as to God's choice of the elect & the sins of the ...


4

There are a couple of important points about the story of Eli: Eli is not just a father to Hophi and Phinehas - has is also a fellow-priest, possibly their superior, and responsible for their actions more than a father would be. There is no direct punishment on Eli - the punishment that is declared is that his descendants will not live to an old age. Is ...


4

This is not the entire answer, however, I'd like to give you a perspective that may inform the answer. I grew up in a Christian home, where Santa Clause was forbidden, whereas my wife grew up in a Christian home where Santa Clause was a celebrated and beloved part of the holiday. When I read you question, I could almost here the voice of my mother speaking ...


3

If a priest violates the seal of confession, he is automatically excommunicated, period. Even if someone confesses to being a rapist, serial killer that enjoys hitting kittens with a baseball bat, the priest violates the seal of confession, that priest is still excommunicated. There are norms for the reporting of child abuse (and often if a child is ...


3

I think your question is covered by Can. 913: Can. 913 §1. The administration of the Most Holy Eucharist to children requires that they have sufficient knowledge and careful preparation so that they understand the mystery of Christ according to their capacity and are able to receive the body of Christ with faith and devotion. §2. The Most Holy ...


3

It is clear how Christ feels about children in Matthew 18:2-4, He called a little child to him, and placed the child among them. 3 And he said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. 4 Therefore, whoever takes the lowly position of this child is the greatest in the kingdom ...


3

In Judaism religious maturity is celebrated when a young man reaches the age of 13 (bar mitzvah) or when a young woman reaches 12 (bat mitzvah). At that point they are said to become a son or daughter of the commandments; from then onward they are expected to follow the law and be responsible spiritually for their own actions. 'Age of accountability' is not ...


3

It's hard to top the Haydock commentary for this so I'll just cite it and link to it (though I did add the emphasis): Ver. 1. Who, thinkest thou? This altercation for superiority among the apostles, whilst they were upon their road to Judea, might have arisen from another cause besides the precedence given by Jesus Christ to Peter above, as St. ...


3

I would offer 1 Samuel also, but specifically 1 Sam 3:1-10 in which Samuel as a child receives advice from Eli on responding to God's call.


3

Jesus' remarks were that those who would receive his teachings would be like little children. Also see the Beatitudes, which provides more detail about the simple childlike faith (my words) of those that would receive him (meek, pure in heart, peacemakers, etc.). The Kingdom of God belongs to those who can accept Christ in the same way a little child simply ...


2

In the Methodist tradition, baptism of infants is a holy sacrament, welcoming the child into the church family and into God's grace. It also involves a covenant by the parents and the congregation to teach and guide the child, to raise the child within a faith community, and to help lead the child to make a faith profession and become a disciple of Christ. ...


2

"Things" is simply Truth, these Truths. It is better to be humble than proud. Grace is better than triumph. That all credit for anything we achieve belongs to God. Things like that.


2

Catholics of the Eastern Churches (Ruthenian, Ukranian, Melkite, etc), like the orthodox, baptize, commune and chrismate infants.


2

I found this website which lists currently practicing denominations: Confederation of Reformed Evangelical Churches (CREC) Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA) Covenant Presbyterian Church Federation of Reformed Churches (FORC) Reformed Episcopal (REC) I'm not sure which denominations/traditions have stopped practicing paedocommunion, but I ...


2

The Orthodox practice paedocommunion and the Roman Catholics used to but don't anymore. I can't speak to your second point though.


2

Of course we are speculating about things not fully revealed in scripture, so we must start be saying we are looking for an opinion on the subject. Here is my opinion which assumes God’s elections stands before the creation of the world: Since God chose all the elect (parents and children) before the foundations of the world, a parent’s behavior has no ...



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