New answers tagged

-1

There is another aspect to this question which is important. It is that the Catholic Church accepts as valid any baptism done in the Trinitarian form with the proper intention. This means that if an adult from another Christian denomination who has already been baptized converts to the Catholic Church, in most cases, he or she does not need to be ...


2

As Geremia said, they would not (indeed, could not) be re-baptized if their original baptism was (known to be) valid. The main thing the returning Catholic would have to do is to make a good confession. The priest hearing the confession would be able to decide whether anything more needed to be done, for example to repair any scandal that the apostasy ...


2

No, they would not be re-baptized (unless there was doubt about the validity of the first baptism, in which case he would need to be conditionally baptized). In the case of a public apostate, it would be prudent for a bishop to issue a public letter making the ex-apostate's reversion known to all, so as to avoid the possibility of scandalizing those who ...


-1

...transliteration involves representing the characters of one alphabet in another alphabet; it has nothing to do with translating the meaning of the word, only the sound of it. (source) Transliteration would then occur in scripture when the sound of the words are as important (or more important) to the story/message than the meaning of the words. ...


3

But can you say that that is absolutely and exclusive or do you have to leave an opening because we don't always know the ways of God? Current teaching leans more toward the latter than the former ... but the simplest (and arguably the best) way would be through Christ. (CCC 1987 - 2029 is a discourse to that effect, in detail, as is the treatment ...


0

Christmas is a Holy Day of Obligation. As such, Catholics are expected to attend Mass on that day. (The vigil mass on Christmas Eve counts). but are they obligated to celebrate Christmas in the traditional tree-in-the-house, gift-giving sense? No, they are not obligated. Such celebration is optional, though most Catholics probably do that as it ...


0

An Official version is available On Line from the Vatican This link takes you to the compendium of the catechism of the Catholic Church which is hosted at the Vatican's web page. In Appendix A, Common Prayers, the Gloria Patri is rendered with Latin next to English. English: Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, as it was ...


3

Your question has to be answered in three parts and must be answered with a sober yes; but the yes can be only permitted in or by a case of grave necessity. The ordinary ministers of the Eucharist are the bishop and the priests of the diocese or religious house. The ordinary ministers of proclaiming the gospel are the bishop, the priest and the deacon. As ...


0

Short Answer It could not be the Holy Spirit, as the Holy Spirit doesn't have a body (beyond the Son's, more on that later). It could not be the Father, since God is not bound by death. (God is eternal: always is, was and shall be, as taught by the Catholic Church). Who does that leave? The Son. Discussion The Doctrine of the Trinity holds that ...


4

The Catholic Church has not issued a definitive teaching on this topic. There are certain boundaries that have been established, e.g. that our souls have not always existed but rather were created by God, and that the soul is definitely present within the body at conception. The exact timing, however, is not known, and, indeed, the Church has no firm ...


11

It seems clear that Catholic Church debunked Origens claim that souls were created and existed before conception and birth. That is not as clear as you suggest, and certainly the soul is there before birth according to current teaching of the RCC. Current teaching looks like "at the time of conception" per the following: The Catechism of the ...


0

No, the Church does not have a separatist attitude toward science. There have been periods in which, admittedly, some persons in the hierarchy of the Church have viewed the natural sciences with a certain suspicion (one thinks of the condemnation of Galileo), but such an attitude has neither been the norm nor is it compatible with Church teaching. ...


4

Short answer: no, it's not a fair assessment, particularly in light of what the Church itself professes. The assertion being made is much like asserting that the Soldiers aren't really the Army, but that the Generals are. As such, it takes on the character of a false dichotomy and is a flawed premise, since the Church as it exists isn't an either-or ...


0

While participation in the Holy Mass on Christmas is mandatory, receiving of Holy Communion is not. It is also not mandatory to have other celebrations. In fact, many members choose not to celebrate Christmas within a year of death of a family member, or someone equally dear.


-1

There are claims made by Hugh Ross and others that the Catholic Church endorses the "non-overlapping magesteria" model for the relationship between science and religion. A problem with these claims is that the Church rarely ties itself down to a non-negotiable position as clearly as this. The result is that these specific claims are liable to be ...


2

The "'non-overlapping magesteria' model for the relationship between science and religion" is not Catholic. In fact, it is condemned as a part of the heresy of Modernism, what Pope St. Pius X called the "synthesis of all heresies" in his 1907 encyclical condemning Modernism, Pascendi Dominici gregis (my emphases):Faith and Science 16. Having reached this ...


0

I will come back to add more references, but the topic of faith and science comes up in many of Bishop Robert Barron videos, talks and posts. From this paragraph, it seems that the answer is in some sense in support of the non-overlapping magesteria: The obvious success of the physical sciences—evident in the technology that surrounds us and facilitates ...


2

As a Catholic, you are required to celebrate the "holy-day" of Christmas, as you mentioned, by going to Mass, receiving the Eucharist, giving honor and glory to God and celebrating Jesus' birth. However, you are not required to celebrate it in the "traditional tree in the house gift giving sense". These traditions, like many traditions on Christian holidays, ...


1

At present there are a total number of 23 Eastern Rite Catholic Traditions in use at the present moment. On January 19, 2015 Pope Francis established the Eritrean Catholic Church. On July 7, 2007 Pope Benedict XVI issued his Apostolic Letter Summorum Pontificum in which he permitted the Mass of Pope St Pius V to be used in the Roman Catholic Rite. The ...


1

The Catholic Haydock Commentary, which collects the Fathers' and other Catholic scriptural scholars' commentaries, says for John 10:34: Ver. 34. This is addressed to princes established to govern the people of God. They are the image of God on earth by the authority they exercise, and which they have received from Him. --- Is it not written in your law, ...


0

Public Revelation as the Church defines it, ended with the death of the last Apostle, St. John. All revelations since then are in the domain of Private Revelation. Thus the Prophecies of the Popes falls into this category. The question as to whether or not it is a forgery is not in this answer. Any vision or apparition must always be free of any errors of ...


1

The Popes as successors of St. Peter hold the keys to bind and loosen things on earth as well as in heaven (Matthew 16:19 and 18:18). The Popes have not even pronounced on the question as to the demise of the apostle Judas Iscariot and we all know the grave words that Jesus spoke about him shortly before the Passion: "Better for this man that he had never ...


1

In traditional Catholic parlance, “affectivity” refers to the passions (in modern parlance: generally feelings or emotions) of love that one person might experience for another. It is roughly a synonym for the modern term “affection.” We can see this usage, for example, in St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae, I-IIae, q. 22, a. 2, sed contra: Sed contra ...


2

Another exception to Athanasius' answer is Mass in the Ordinariate Use, published in Divine Worship: The Missal in 2015. This order is in traditional-language English ("thee, thou" etc), and it's possible to construct an English-language Mass which is practically identical to the Traditional Latin Mass. We celebrate one such Mass weekly. There are some ...


3

If by “Tridentine Mass” the O.P. means the Mass promulgated by Pope Pius V in 1570 (probably better termed the “traditional Roman Rite”), which was used widely in that form until the liturgical reforms after Vatican II (and is still used to varying degrees today), then the answer is that it is basically only used in Latin, with a small number of exceptions ...


1

There is no one unique answer to this question. The Saints are given to the Church so that the many may have examples to follow. In addition to this, the number of martyrs beatified and/or canonized by Pope John Paul II is staggering. The first saints of the Early Church were all martyrs. Martyrdom was an exceptional way of being united to Jesus on the ...


4

We must distinguish between the two limbos: Limbo of hell or of the Patriarchs (limbus inferni seu patrum)This is also known as Abraham's bosom. This limbo no longer exists (cf. "Reply to Objection 3" of this) because Christ has already descended into hell and brought those souls detained there to heaven during His Ascension. Limbo for children (limbus ...


4

No, the Summa Theologica/Theologiae is not infallible. It was written by St. Thomas Aquinas, who though he was very good, holy, and learned, was not infallible. On those occasions on which the Pope is considered infallible (that is, when he addresses the whole Church as its teacher and pastor, and defines a doctrine which must be held by the whole Church), ...


2

The concept of limbo probably began with Thomas Aquinas but for some reason was never formalised as Catholic doctrine. When I was a young child, many years ago, the brothers taught me about limbo as fact, and I was certainly required to be able answer test questions on the subject, but it seems it never had formal doctrinal status. Recent Catholic ...


5

As far as why individual Catholics participate in the various liturgies and sacraments, there can be all sorts of reasons, from the highly religious to the merely social or cultural. The Church does have teachings on the subject, though; let's look at those. As far as going to Mass on Sundays (and some other days): This is a requirement for Catholics. In ...


2

I am not a canon lawyer, and Stack Exchange should not be relied upon for legal advice, but the canon lawyer Edward Peters does have something to say on this. Canon 1432 of the Johanno-Pauline Code states “A defender of the bond is to be appointed in a diocese for cases concerning the nullity of sacred ordination or the nullity or dissolution of a ...


3

Natural vs. Supernatural Orders A human is composed of a body and a soul. Since the human soul is virtually infinite—just think of all that man desires, can know, and can do etc.—, it is not fulfilled by finite creation. Man was created for a higher, supernatural end, which he can attain by God's grace. Your question is essentially asking about the ...


4

Blessing expresses the basic movement of Christian prayer: it is an encounter between God and man. In blessing, God’s gift and man’s acceptance of it are united in dialogue with each other. The prayer of blessing is man’s response to God's gifts: because God blesses, the human heart can in return bless the One who is the source of every blessing. ...


14

"Secret" is probably about the worst possible translation I can think of for the original term. The "Archivio Segreto Vaticano" is the current term in Italian, as documented on the Archive's website. This translates the Latin "Archivium Secretum Vaticanum" (see for example the references here). Secretum in Latin, however, does not necessarily mean "secret". ...


2

No, such a thing would not be possible. The Pope cannot unilaterally canonize anyone. That would completely miss the point of declaring someone a saint, which is to present their lives as a public example of heroic virtue for Catholics to imitate. By canonizing some of the faithful, i.e., by solemnly proclaiming that they practiced heroic virtue and ...


4

Life goes on as usual for all the cardinal of the Church after the election of a new Pope. They must obey the new Sovereign Pontiff in filial joy and reverence. Nor do any of the cardinals have to worry about any chance of a reprisal if some had indeed voted for another candidate. In the Apostolic Constitution Universi dominici Gregis of Pope John Paul II ...


3

Perhaps this can help with an answer to your question if I have understood it correctly. If Pope John II (532-535) was the first pope to change his name, it was due to the fact that his given name Mercury was that of a pagan Roman god and thus he was trying to avoid a scandal. The pope Pelagius I (566-561) and Pope Pelagius II (579-590), on the other hand, ...


1

The Association of Interchurch Families, England, has published a copy of the following First Trilateral Agreement on Interchurch Marriages between the Catholic Church and the Malankara Syrian Orthodox Church (1994). The Agreement states The Malankara Syrian Orthodox Church is an autonomous church under the authority of the Syrian Orthodox Patriarch of ...


1

The Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church is a break-away part of the universal Catholic Church and was formed after the Coonan Cross Oath , taken on 3 January 1653. It was a public avowal by members of the Saint Thomas Christian community of Kerala, India that they would not submit to Portuguese dominance in ecclesiastical and secular life. The swearing of the ...


0

Yes, of course the Catholic Church has an ideal age to start dating: NEVER An excellent book for young men and young women approaching the idea of dating is The ABC's of Choosing a Good Husband: How to Find and Marry a Great Guy and it's corollary The ABC's of Choosing a Good Wife: How to Find and Marry a Great Girl by Steven Wood, founder of the Family ...


0

The question is not clear. If you hold the beads flat, there's a "direction" ( e.g. clockwise), but if they hang down e.g. while standing to pray, how would you tell which way is which? There's never an order marked on the beads. It's not even particularly strict that one must say the 3 Aves, Paternoster and Creed before the decades, as opposed to after.


2

According to the Catholic Church's canon law on mixed marriages, 1983 Can. 1124 Without express permission of the competent authority, a marriage is prohibited between two baptized persons of whom one is baptized in the Catholic Church or received into it after baptism and the other of whom is enrolled in a Church or ecclesial community not in full ...


4

Catholicism does not necessarily believe that there was a single moment at which Christ redeemed us: Christ’s whole life is a mystery of redemption. Redemption comes to us above all through the blood of his cross [cf. Eph 1:7; Col 1:13–14; 1 Pet 1:18–19], but this mystery is at work throughout Christ’s entire life: already in his ...


3

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses this question in Summa Theologica III q. 3 a. 8 ("Whether it was more fitting that the Person of the Son rather than any other Divine Person should assume human nature?") c.: It was most fitting that the Person of the Son should become incarnate. First, on the part of the union; for such as are similar are fittingly united. ...


0

As a Catholic you are actually forbidden from naming your children with demonic names: Lucifer Beelzebub Baal Moloch are all off limits. citation needed, pretty sure I heard it on Relevant Radio... But, I'd bet you could name your kid Damien a'Molokai or some variant. "The Omen" is not canonical and hopefully the Leper Priest is remembered longer than ...


3

One can never do evil so that a good comes about (cf. Rom. 3:8,6:1: "let us do evil, that there may come good? whose damnation is just. … Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound? God forbid."). A vasectomy for contraceptive purposes is mutilation, and mutilation is a sin (cf., e.g., 1 Cor. 3:16 & 12:18). There can be no dispensation to sin. That ...


10

What a “dispensation” is First of all, a “dispensation” is a legal term, in which the competent authority relieves one of its subjects from having to follow a law (or part of a law) in a particular case. The Code of Canon Law describes dispensations as follows: A dispensation, or the relaxation of a merely ecclesiastical law in a particular case, can be ...


2

No. There are only official guidelines for marriage: by the Code of Canon Law (book VI, can 1083) A man before he has completed his sixteenth year of age and a woman before she has completed her fourteenth year of age cannot enter into a valid marriage. The conference of bishops is free to establish a higher age for the licit celebration of ...


6

Yes: the Catechism provides explicit guidance on this matter, and it's covered in Canon Law. The sacrament of Baptism is conferred "in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."85 In Baptism, the Lord's name sanctifies man, and the Christian receives his name in the Church. This can be the name of a saint, that is, of a disciple ...



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