New answers tagged

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The answers to the O.P.'s questions are simple: No, the pronunciation of a word would not enter in any meaningful way into the contents of the faith. Faith has to do with God and those truths revealed by Him. (See Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 156.) The revelation of God as “I Am Who Am” (see Ex. 3:14), which is deeply linked to the Tetragrammaton, ...


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THE CATECHISM OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH (pdf) is the doctrine summarizing the beliefs of the Catholic church. Its articles are listed below under their respective headings. "The Freedom of Faith" (page 44) To be human, man's response to God by faith must be free, and... therefore nobody is to be forced to embrace the faith against his will... Christ ...


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Granmirupa is correct. Going to add a little more info. According to the St. Anthony Messenger: BOOK "According to Francis X. Weiser in the Handbook of Christian Feasts and Customs (Harcourt Brace), as late as 1952 Catholics in Central Europe brought wine and cider to church for blessing on the feast of St. John. They then took it home and some of them ...


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According to canon law on mixed marriages (i.e., marriages between a Catholic and non-Catholic), 1917 Can. 1060 … if there is a danger of perversion to the Catholic spouse and children, that marriage is forbidden even by divine law. Also—regarding the children, the procreation and education of whom is the primary purpose of marriage—it is required that ...


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For (1), you'll have to ask a question at Islam.SE. For (2), consider these paragraphs from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 104 In Sacred Scripture, the Church constantly finds her nourishment and her strength, for she welcomes it not as a human word, "but as what it really is, the word of God". "In the sacred books, the Father who is in heaven ...


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Muslims say that Christians changed the words of Jesus over time, hence inserted false statements into the Bible where Jesus claimed to be God. (See http://www.answering-islam.org/Morin/changed.html) This claim was made long ago, before the discoveries of ancient Bible manuscripts, hymnals, fragments, the Dead Sea Scrolls and other strong evidence that no ...


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The reason is: The Church provided a special blessing of wine in honor of the Saint. According to legend St. John drank a glass of poisoned wine without suffering harm because he had blessed it before he drank. The wine is also a symbol of the great love of Christ that filled St. John's heart with loyalty, courage and enthusiasm for his Master; ...


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There are two common Pentecostal doctrines that are at play here: 1. Pentecostal beliefs on Water Baptism Firstly the general belief with regard to (water) Baptism is that it is for believers only; this is called credobaptism (or just believer's baptism) and is a belief that almost all Pentecostals hold in common with Baptists. It means that any form of ...


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Granmirupa, in fact you are wrong. There remain considerable differences between most who consider themselves "Anglo-catholic" and those who self identify as Catholic, other than whether the Archbishop of Canterbury, or the Bishop of Rome exercises authority over the church. One of the differences between [Roman] Catholics and Anglo-catholics is that it's ...


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Even with some changes within some of the Anglican community (the Confession of St Louis, establishment of the Traditional Anglican Communion, or the Anglican Ordinariate per the link in @Geremia's answer) the differences are rooted in the original schism. The Schism in Brief The schism itself had as much to do with politics and culture as it did ...


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Catechism of the Council of Trent (The Roman Catechism) "Article 7: From thence he shall come to judge the living and the dead.:" Reasons For General Judgment It is necessary to show why, besides the particular judgment of each individual, a general one should also be passed upon all men. Those who depart this life sometimes leave behind them ...


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The Short Answer, our standing before God at the time of our death is determined concerning salvation and damnation. If sanctification is not completed do to sins committed after baptism and atonement yet to be made in and through the atoning sacrifice of the Cross, that will be done before entering into the Presence of the our Father in heaven. The General ...


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It is not as simple as a yes or no. The relevant section of the Cathecism says the following are important in understanding the statement "Outside the Church there is no salvation": "salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is his Body" - this doctrine, as all doctrines of the Church, is centered on Christ. It is not about punishing ...


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An excellent Catholic work on humility is Fr. Cajetan Mary da Bergamo's Humility of Heart.(A fully OCRed version available here.)


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The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass: Dogmatically, Liturgically and Ascetically Explained (1902) by Fr. Nikolaus Gihr writes in the first footnote of §32, "The Language Used in the Celebration of the Holy Mass" (p. 319-328): Whether the Apostles celebrated the Holy Sacrifice in the language of each individual nation or only in the Aramean (Syro-Chaldaic), ...


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I think if you observe your quotes closely, your answer is revealed within them. Notice in the John passage Jesus states, for I did not come to condemn the world. When was it that he had said this, it was in his incarnation, his first arrival to earth, to carry out his salvific act, the act that would allow reconciliation to all who would place their trust ...


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The Haydock Commentary on that verse says: Ver. 47. I do not judge him. To judge here, may signify to condemn. St. Augustine expounds it in this manner: I do not judge him at this my first coming. St. Chrysostom says, it is not I only that judgeth him, but the works also that I do. Thus, during His 1st coming He doesn't judge, but he certainly will at ...


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People are not condemned, judged, or punished because they do not have faith in Jesus. They are condemned because of the evil acts they have committed during their life on Earth. They are saved from punishment by faith in Jesus, and (depending on your view on justification by faith alone or with works) by those works of righteousness that spring from that ...


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Here's what the Catholic Haydock Commentary says about those verses: Ver. 31. Covenant. That made with the captives was not such. Their covenant is grown old, and at an end, as St. Paul shews, Hebrews viii. 8. They were not indeed divided, as they had been, Ezechiel xxxvii. 16. Ver. 32. Dominion. As a husband, (Hebrew; Calmet) or "Lord." (Haydock) ...


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Jesus confronted the official because he was and always will be testifying on the side of the truth. Jesus already knew what is going to happen - He will die for all our sins - and maybe wanted to show the pharisee that he was a liar and that he was judging him unfairly. There where no reasons for any penalty. Whatever Jesus would do or say He was going to ...


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It is rare but under certain circumstances a Latin Rite priest may be married. Usually this occurs when a Priest/Minister from Lutheran or Episcopal church petitions Rome (local Bishop) to become Catholic and at the same time remain/become ordained as a Latin Rite priest. This usually occurs due to great upset in a church - such as German Lutheran pastors ...


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Oxford University Press prints large numbers of Catholic Bibles, But each diocese, Catholic Book/Bible supplier purchases such from their preferred supplier, there are 1.2 billion professed Catholics the sheer volume of Catholic Bibles and their various languages translation means there are numerous printers of bibles. Many Catholics myself included who are ...


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Priests and bishops of the Eastern Churches in full communion with the Bishop of Rome may concelebrate at any celebration of the Eucharist in any rite, including the Latin Rite, provided they have the permission of the diocesan bishop or eparch. The Code of Canon Law is silent on this issue, but the Code of Canons of Oriental Churches (CCEO) says, A ...


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There are a number of aspects to the O.P.’s question, but it seems to center around the question, “Must the marital act be done for the sake of procreation?” or said in other words, “Must the couple have the intention to have a child whenever they perform the marital act?” The answer to that question is basically “no,” although the marital act must never be ...


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Short Answer Strictly speaking, the Church is as against sex among the non-married heterosexuals than it is against sex among non-married homosexuals. By teaching, the Church only accepts as correct sex between a man and a woman who are a married couple. All other sex is considered fornication, adultery, or a variety of other disordered acts. (Offenses ...


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You state: ... if I were to have sex with my wife without the intention to procreate, it would be considered a sin by the Catholic Church. This is not actually the case. The Catholic Church recognizes that one of the goods of sexual activity is the increase in love and intimacy between the spouses—what it calls the unitive aspect of sex. The ...


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Well, I'll just translate a part belonging to ap.Cleopas, written in the Orthodox Encyclopaedia Cleopas [gr. Κλεόπας, Κλωπᾶς; lat. Cleophas] (I cen.), ap. of 70th (mem. 4 Jan - in Council; mem. byzant. 29 Oct. и 30 Jun - in Council). Most of hermeneuts of ancient Church didn't seek to determine the person of the hidden companion of Cl., but some authors ...


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To the best of my knowledge, the Catholic Church, post 2nd Vatican Council, has come to take a more liberal view on family planning in that it promotes the use of Rhythm method of birth-control. What the Catholic Church opposes is artificial or unnatural methods of birth- control. The view that a couple having physical union without the purpose of ...


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Not prior to the 2nd century, mainly since the catacombs were not developed until then. While there are various Christian frescos in these underground tombs which demonstrate a devotion to the saints, including the Virgin Mary, the time period for their origin would be no earlier than the late 2nd century or early 3rd, for even though Christians ...


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The Catholic Church has responded implicitly and partially, in at least one instance where Pope Francis has suggested that married couples could use contraceptives because of exposure to the Zika virus. This does acknowledge the need for sexual intimacy when a good reason - in this case, a particular possibility of foetal defects - exists for not ...


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The Catholic Church has very few dogmatic interpretations of Scripture. This means that as in the case of most texts, there is the possibility for various explanations within the realm of acceptable Catholic exegesis in this situation. There is not an official dogmatic interpretation of Isaiah 53:9 in the Catholic Church that explicitly makes the connection ...


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Only those married have a right to sexual intercourse, which must be ordered to the procreation of children. This was clearly expressed in the 1917 Code of Canon Law: 1081 §2. Consensus matrimonialis est actus voluntatis quo utraque pars tradit et acceptat ius in corpus, perpetuum et exclusivum, in ordine ad actus per se aptos ad prolis generationem. ...


0

The footnote apparatus in the NABRE consists mainly of philology, that is describing how the extant text developed into what we have today. Mixed within are some details regarding Catholic doctrine, but the footnotes do not comprise religious or theological commentary. Except for a very few cases where Catholic interpretation is briefly presented, the ...


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The seventh candle seems to be the jurisdiction candle. The number of candles "at a pontifical high Mass, celebrated by the ordinary, seven candles are lighted. The seventh candle should be somewhat higher than the others, and should be placed at the middle of the altar in line with the other six. For this reason the altar crucifix is moved forward a ...


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I'm fully aware that there are those who will fundamentally disagree with the Church on this point. However, I've attempted to present an objective account of the position the Church holds. The Church justifies it by saying that giving in to the temptation which the human condition provides, in defiance of the divine order which is present in male and ...


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This might not really answer your question, but the first thing that popped up into my head was the Book of Revelations. John has a series of visions and one of the symbols used is the Seven Candlesticks. Revelations 1:12 :- "And I turned to see the voice that spake with me. And being turned, I saw seven golden candlesticks;" According to the Zondervan KJV ...


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The Protoevangelium of James, is an apocryphal Gospel probably written about AD 145. The document presents itself as written by James: "I, James, wrote this history in Jerusalem." The purported author is thus James, the brother of Jesus, but scholars have established that the work was not written by the person to whom it is attributed. Before the end of ...


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Yes, absolutely. The depositum fidei is the fullness of God's Word contained in both Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. Christ has entrusted to the shepherds of God's people the task of interpreting His Word for the Church: Sacred tradition and Sacred Scripture form one sacred deposit of the word of God, committed to the Church. Holding fast to this ...


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The Catholic Church believes that souls who die in the state of grace, yet still need to be purified from the temporal punishment due to sin are purified in Purgatory. Catholic teaching regarding prayers of the dead is bound up inseparably with the doctrine of purgatory and the more general doctrine of the communion of the saints, which is an article of the ...


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The harmonization would be that the Gospel of Matthew is divinely inspired Sacred Scripture, while the Protoevangelium of James is merely pious tradition. In case of nonconformity between the two, Matthew takes precedence.


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Those on earth do not know with certainty whether one is in hell, purgatory, or heaven—unless the Church has canonized the faithfully departed as a saint, in which case one is certain he or she is in heaven. Thus, Catholics pray for departed souls in the case they might be in purgatory: …the Catholic Church, instructed by the Holy Ghost, has, from the ...


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There is no biblical evidence for any brother of Joseph, in fact Luke 24:18 introduces Cleopas as if the author knew nothing of any relationship between Jesus and Cleopas. John 19:25 refers to Cleophas, perhaps the same person, simply as the husband of a woman called Mary, who was also the sister of Mary, mother of Jesus. Richard Buckham (Gospel Women, page ...


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The Essentials Marriage is a Sacrament. The Church has nothing to do with a divorce. (That's a civil matter). The passages in Matthew 19 and Mark 10 are pretty clear about Moses permitting divorce because the peoples' hearts had hardened, while the original law is that "two shall become one flesh" which Jesus pointedly reminds his audience. (You're ...


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I am not sure if this is the answer but here I go. Purity. A good example would be (not sure where I read it from, I am speaking from my memory so apologies if it is wrong), long time ago church banned common people from performing exorcism. Problem was, after casting demons out, demons end up attacking people who caste them out. So what Our Lord telling ...


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First off, no: "Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy are basically the same doctrinally" is incorrect. That is beyond the scope of this question, but it's a flawed premise. (See details at the link for an introduction, the issue is somewhat complex). Did Luther believe that the Church needed to be doctrinally reformed even before the Great Schism? ...


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Yes, a non Catholic can confess to a Catholic priest. (The canon law point has already been addressed). What the non Catholic is not generally eligible for is the full sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation.; thus the priest cannot grant you absolution.1 Our priest makes that clear to folks who are married to Catholics but who aren't of that ...


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I hope that this was written to indicate that Jesus had, in his burial, fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah at 53:9 (RSVCE) " And they made his grave with the wicked and with a rich man in his death..." Clearly, only a rich man could afford to construct a grave hewn in rock. And, Matthew 27:57 in deed depicts Joseph of Arimathe'a as a rich man !


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In order to answer this question, it is necessary to understand precisely what is meant by “conscience” and its relationship to human acts (that is, those actions that can be qualified as morally right or wrong). The Church, generally taking its cue from Medieval Scholasticism (see, e.g., Summa theologiae [S.Th.], Ia, q. 79, a. 13), defines the conscience ...


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As an Anglican priest and the Anglican Chaplain on the island of Ibiza I performed a marriage in Ibiza, for a Catholic couple. Their Catholic English parish priest in England completed all the necessary paperwork and authorities, petitioned their Diocesan Bishop of Durham who gave a dispensation for the couple to be married by me. This was sanctioned by ...


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I would like to add to KorvinStarmast's excellent answer that all of the sacraments have three essential components common to all seven of them: A sign: some kind of physical sign that is performed. (This sign can then be resolved in most of the sacraments into the “matter”—generally either whatever is transformed by the sacrament, or the physical gesture ...



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