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8

In the beginning of John's mission, he seemed to think that God was coming in wrath to judge the wicked: When he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming to his baptism, he said to them, "You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the coming wrath? ... Even now the ax lies at the root of the trees. Therefore every tree that does not bear good ...


7

Note that this is an old ritual that only makes sense in the context in which it was developed. The ritual is no longer used, no doubt in part because it seems very strange for modern sensibilities. A couple of clarifications are in order, first of all. Excommunication (and other ecclesiastical penalties) are, and always have been, "medicinal." Their ...


7

The short answer is "no," an annulment is not a Catholic divorce. Although the term "annulment" has come into common use, it is somewhat misleading, since it makes it seem as if an existing marriage is "annulled" or "cancelled." In fact, Church law does not use that term, but instead contemplates a declaration of the nullity (or non-existence) of a ...


6

As regards God's Laws, NO! as regards her laws, YES! In each generation, the Church receives from the previous generation, preserves it intact, and passes onto the next generation depositum fidei1, the Sacred deposit of the faith that consists of Sacred Scripture and Holy Tradition, entrusted to her by the Apostles to whom Jesus said in Matt 28:18-20: ...


6

Catholics The main requirement for a Catholic who has received First Communion is that the person must be in a state of grace (the person has been to confession since committing a mortal sin). As for divorced and remarried persons, non-marital intercourse is a mortal sin and divorces are not recognized by the Catholic Church so... The person must also ...


6

In the US, what are the guidelines on how one should receive Holy Communion? Those who receive Communion may receive either in the hand or on the tongue, and the decision should be that of the individual receiving, not of the person distributing Communion. If Communion is received in the hand, the hands should first of all be clean. If one is right ...


5

Catholics believe in transubstantiation, The substance of the consecrated host is the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ. The worship given to the Blessed Sacrament is divine adoration (latria1). 1324 The Eucharist is "the source and summit of the Christian life."134 "The other sacraments, and indeed all ecclesiastical ministries and works of ...


5

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith published a very very brief document on the subject in 2001. The entire text of the English translation is: Question: Whether the baptism conferred by the community «The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints», called «Mormons» in the vernacular, is valid. Response: Negative. The Supreme ...


5

Most Catholics are baptized as infants; consequently, there are two sets of requirements: one for the parents or guardians of infants who are to be baptized, and one for adults (those who have "reached the age of reason", which is not specified in the Code of Canon Law and may be perhaps left up to the local bishop). The general church-wide rules regarding ...


5

In Catechism of the Catholic Church, 311, it states, quoting St. Augustine: For almighty God. . ., because he is supremely good, would never allow any evil whatsoever to exist in his works if he were not so all-powerful and good as to cause good to emerge from evil itself. Thus only God himself knows why so many souls, from a Catholic Perspective, ...


5

I know for a fact that the Catholic Church does not recognize those who do not baptize in the proper form and matter as Christians. Thus the Catholic Church does not recognize the validity of groups such as Mormons or Jehovahs Witness (although I don't think the Jehovah's witness consider themselves Christian to begin with) The Catechism of the Catholic ...


5

Here's the current practice in the USA: Baptism of children in the care of same-sex couples presents a serious pastoral concern. Nevertheless, the Church does not refuse the Sacrament of Baptism to these children, but there must be a well founded hope that the children will be brought up in the Catholic religion. In those cases where Baptism is ...


5

I think, as is often the case, that in some times and places, the Church was co-opted by the Aristocracy. While the Church certainly had a vested interest in promoting learning, the Aristocracy did not. After all, Scripture is a revolutionary thing, and if the working classes (peasantry) became to well versed in exactly what the Bible teaches, they might be ...


4

When Catholics say that a Mass is celebrated "for" something or someone, it just means that the priest offering the Mass, which for Catholics is the very highest form of prayer, for the sake of some intention. It is a kind of intercessory prayer, and Masses can be offered for any kind of intention (for example, for an end to a war or famine, for a recovery ...


4

In Catholic teaching and theology, there is what is called a vocation1, i.e. a calling. From all eternity, God has called each one of us to be what he wanted each one of us to be. This calling is unique and unrepeatable precisely because each person is unique and unrepeatable2. 1. We define personal vocation as God's call and plan for one's entire life. cf. ...


4

They are of the Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth (source).


4

If you're talking caste, I'm assuming your talking about the Christian caste in India. Within castes, there are denominational differences, which this answer will discuss. Legend says that St. Thomas - one of the original 12 apostles - made it to India in 52 AD. That's the official origin story of Christianity in India. The Christians of Nagaland and ...


4

The question, as it stands, really isn't soluable. Reason #1: The Crucifixion raises other Trinitarian questions First and foremost, the Trinity itself is hard enough to understand. There is no good analogy and any attempt to make one will necessarily fail by over emphasizing oneness or threeness. Worse, the Crucifixion and death of Christ means that ...


4

I imagine Catholics and Protestants are pretty much united in the way they look at Jesus' temptation in the wilderness, since both "camps" hold Scripture in high esteem and believe it to be God's word. There is perhaps no better answer to your question, then, than the one found in Hebrews, especially chapter 2, verses 17 and 18, as well as chapters 4 and ...


4

The selected answer was great, but they doesn't prevent another controversialist from submitting his 2¥. When Bl. Pope Paul VI was about to make a decision on whether or not to allow Contraception in the Church and all his focus groups were pointing him towards embracing modernity, he wrote that: the solution to this question had emerged which were at ...


4

Yes, you could conceivably be married by proxy, via Skype. Can. 1104 §1. To contract a marriage validly the contracting parties must be present together, either in person or by proxy [per procuratorem]. There can be no online confession: Can. 964 §1. The proper place to hear sacramental confessions is a church or oratory. §3. Confessions ...


4

I kind of think the answer to this question is purely pastoral. It's not in any Encyclical or the Catechism, but the answer comes to a person who forms their conscience well and the Church has a lot of guidance on how to form your conscience. Seek first the Kingdom and the Will of God. Marriage (and the acts that follow) is what God calls man to most ...


4

There are indeed things that the Catechism has to tell us about chastity; in fact, there is a whole section on it (Part Three, Section Two, Chapter Two, Article 6, Heading II) titled "The Vocation to Chastity". Chastity, we are told, is the successful integration of sexuality within the person and thus the inner unity of man in his bodily and spiritual ...


4

As far as I know, the Catholic Church hasn't made any statement about the origins of homosexuality. The best way to understand this perspective of homosexuality as a "disorder" is as a mental or emotional disorder. To be clear, the Catholic Church hasn't actually called it that, but that is similar to how it has been described, both in your quoted material ...


3

You're essentially asking "What's the difference between praying for the dead and praying for the living; and which is more important?" Catholicism, by its interpretation of the communion of saints, believes that each living believer is in communion not only with all others living, but equally with those who have "fallen asleep in Christ": "So it is ...


3

It is the tabernacle where the Eucharist is reserved for adoration. I personally do not like above picture because the Church in question looks very modern and plain. Here are some better pictures The tabernacle is a liturgical furnishing used to house the Eucharist outside of Mass. This provides a location where the Eucharist can be kept for the ...


3

Catholic teaching and understanding is that Christ has two wills, divine (of which, there is only one1) and human - without the human, to my understanding, he couldn't have redeemed in the manner he redeemed [cf. Heb 5:8 & Phil 2:7-9]. 1. In the Godhead the essence, will, and action are but one. - cf. The divine unity in The Blessed Trinity | New ...


3

Edit: removed old answer I think this link will help explain what you are asking: Was Jesus Limited While On Earth? For future reference if that site or page disappears from the internet it is quoted below: Was Jesus Limited While On Earth? Wednesday, January 29th, 2014    tags:The Holy Spirit,Theology Q. I have a question ...


3

I tried to find a primary source for the claims in DickHarfield's answer. I could not find any. People are quoting and re-quoting each other (just like DickHarfield) without a primary source. Unless or Until a primary source is provided this is the best answer I could find on this topic: (These) falsehoods ... have been bandied about by devious ...


3

Context for the answer Has Sacred Scripture and the Church referred to the human embryo as a child? And the answer is YES! [cf. RSVCE returned search results for 'with child' and the Didache, 2]. The OP's position as well is that the human embryo is an unborn child. Proceeding to the question I read two questions here 1. Does the Catholic Church ...



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