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10

Before the Gospel is read, a Catholic makes signs of the cross, with the thumb, on his or her forehead, mouth, and heart, which represents that the Catholic must understand the Gospel, proclaim it, and "take it to heart," i.e., put it into practice, with charity. Dom Prosper Guéranger's Explanation of the Prayers and Ceremonies of the Holy Mass (...


9

Why do Catholics sign themselves three (3) times just before the Gospel is read? To understand the significance of this tradition, let us take a look into its origins. Concerning the making the sign of the cross at the proclamation of the Holy Gospel, after the deacon or priest says, “A reading from the Holy Gospel according to ….,” he and the faithful ...


8

The Catholic Church honors the Apostle St Paul as a Pillar of the Church and as a martyr. The Church celebrates two major events in the life of the Apostle. On January 25, Catholics celebrate the Conversion of St Paul. The martyrdoms of both Saints Peter and Paul is commemorated on the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul, June 29. The moment that changed the ...


7

Contrary to what you say about missals, the rubrics in my missal (The CTS New Daily Missal) say that before the reading of the gospel, "He [the deacon/priest] makes the Sign of the Cross on the book and, together with the people, on his forehead, lips, and breast." (emphasis added)


6

The Code of Canon Law for the Latin Rite Catholic Church states that there may be one or two sponsors for the sacrament of baptism. However, if there are two sponsors, one must be male and the other must be female. Thus two sponsors of the same sex is not permitted according to the laws of the Church. Can. 873 There is to be only one male sponsor or one ...


5

From the Catholic perspective, the universal teaching is that all persons are called by God to chastity, which is understood as a successful integration, inner unity and rational expression of human sexuality, both within the person as well as in interpersonal relationships (CCC 2337). The Church helps sinners in a variety of states of life—including those ...


5

The official website of the Vatican seems to be silent on this issue. Nevertheless it may be up to the local ordinary to make special norms for the diocese in question! The following is taken from Redemptionis Sacramentum of the Vatican: [160.] Let the diocesan Bishop give renewed consideration to the practice in recent years regarding this matter, and ...


4

According to "Letter of the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, To the Bishops, Priests, Consecrated Persons, and Lay Faithful of the Catholic Church, in the People's Republic of China:" ... sacraments administered by such Bishops and priests are likewise valid. More details if you don't want to read the whole letter yourself: In Section 8 of the ...


4

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has this to say on the Image of Man: 355 "God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him, male and female he created them."218 Man occupies a unique place in creation: (I) he is "in the image of God"; (II) in his own nature he unites the spiritual and material worlds; (III) he is created "male ...


3

In a word, no. There is no particular Church teaching regarding what to do with amputated body parts, exported organs, and so forth. Hence, proper medical protocols should be followed (including cremation, especially if that is the safest or least costly option). It should be observed that body parts and organs that have been removed from a living body are ...


3

The whole rationale behind discouraging cremation is that it does not affirm Catholics' faith in the resurrection of the body, and cremation is practiced by pagans and other non-believers. At the General Judgment, when the deceased's souls and bodies reunite again, all the parts of our bodies will be gathered together, including amputated parts. In the ...


3

As long as we're talking about using icons in worship and not worshiping icons: The very earliest written account of icons in general that I'm aware of comes in Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History written in the early 4th century before and during the reign of Constantine (it is regarded as the very first history of the Christian church ever written): I do ...


3

If they do not recognize the papacy, they are schismatic. Schismatics can give valid sacraments, e.g., the Eastern Orthodox schismatics have a valid liturgy and priestly orders. Anyone can validly baptize, provided he or she uses the correct form ("I baptize you in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.") and matter (water). If ...


3

St Thomas Aquinas was canonized on July 18, 1323 and is commonly called the Angelic Doctor and the Universal Teacher. He is also the patron saint of Catholic academies, Catholic schools, Catholic universities, scholars, philosophers and theologians. What have the Popes said on St. Thomas? Pope St Pius V in 1567. St. Pius V declared him a Doctor of The ...


3

To answer your question about 'extreme unction' Gillets summarizes it best under the phrase 'qualified sense' The seven sacraments of the church were all admitted, though in a qualified sense, by Wickliffe. It is evident that his exposition of their significance would strip them of all that peculiar importance which was attributed to them by the ...


3

Having been a lifelong Catholic, I have only picked this up through seeing other people do it. That being said, I have always seen it as being symbolic of keeping the Gospel in my mind, on my lips, and in my heart. You can find some other perspectives on it here and here.


3

I have never encountered a Protestant leader who believed at any point in history that the church should take up arms, acting as a sort of temporary civil power, and engage in military conflict or apply the death penalty to heretics. The Church during the Inquisition never executed heretics, but rather urged for their conversion, as the "Inquisition" ...


2

St. Thomas, in his Catena Aurea (Golden Chain) on St. Mark's Gospel, cap. 11 l. 4, cites St. Theophlyact, who writes: For whosoever sincerely believes evidently lifts up his heart to God, and is joined to Him, and his burning heart feels sure that he has received what he asked for, which he who has experienced will understand; and those persons appear to ...


2

Concordats in the sense of a "treaty" were prominent in Pope Pius XI's papacy (cf. the Lateran Treaty) and in Pope Pius XII's also (Pope Pius XII was Pope Pius XI's secretary of state). See this list of concordats. Also, there are some good books on the Catholic Church and State doctrine: Catholic Church and Christian State: A Series of Essays on the ...


2

The ubiquity doctrine is problematic to Catholics in that it does not acknowledge a "real" (substantial) change. Second, Lutherans reject Rome's identification of the bread and wine as the corporal body and blood of the Lord. At the Lord's Table, the bread remains bread; the wine remains wine. Luther, however, argued that there was a communication of ...


1

From what you've quoted of Ott, it sounds like this "Ubiquity* Doctrine" holds that Christ's human nature is His divine nature. This is the heresy of monophysitism,** which says that Christ only has one nature, not both human and divine natures. *(ubi- = Latin for "where" or "in what place")**(mono- = one; phys- = nature) It is not necessary, for ...


1

Does agape contain affection for others whom the agape is directed to? Short answer: Yes(it can, but it does not seem to be required to). Discussion Definition: Agape (Ancient Greek: ἀγάπη) is "love: the highest form of love, charity; the love of God for man and of man for God." The Catholic teaching on Charity. The catholic teaching is that agape/...


1

My question is, what exactly is this "heavenly reward"? The short answer: the reward is that you are with God rather than not. Discussion Since you ask from the Catholic perspective, the reply will be based on the current Catechism1. About each person getting a different reward. CCC 1023 Those who die in God's grace and friendship and are ...


1

Authority of St. Thomas's Summa Theologica Are all the articles of St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica to be accepted as the truth by every Catholic? The Authority of St. Thomas Aquinas by Fr. Jacobus M. Ramírez, O.P., a famous Thomist, enumerated four "distinct categories of St. Thomas' doctrinal authority, namely, scientific and canonical, ...


1

Lay "Eucharistic Ministers" are a post-Vatican II novelty, as is Communion in the hand. The actual norms only permit them in cases of grave necessity (e.g., in regions where there is no priest). See, e.g., The Eucharistic Storms: Communion in the hand and marginalizing the Real Presence by Barry Forbes.


1

From what you have quoted I would say that we can kill animals for food. "Just satisfaction" meaning to satisfy our reasonable needs - e.g., we need food to live. That we need to treat them kindly speaks to how they are allowed to live and that we "dispatch" them with out causing pain or distress. This, in my opinion, affects the eggs and chickens we buy -...


1

Transubstantiation is adhering to these three mysteries (or miracles), described in the Catechism of the Council of Trent: The Real Presence:that the true body of Christ the Lord, the same that was born of the Virgin, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father in heaven, is contained in this Sacrament. Transubstantion itself:that, however repugnant ...


1

I think one can easily argue that the difference is based on the division the two churches have over papal supremacy As the West felt it truly had supremacy over the whole church, it alone was aggressive in asserting power. Historically the fact that the Roman church also rose up in a government that was persecuting it, and eventually overthrew it's pagan ...


1

When examining your conscience, as a Catholic preparing for the Sacrament of Reconciliation with a book like the Handbook of Prayers, you'll hit this bullet point under the First Commandment: Did I endanger my faith by joining or attending meeting of organizations opposed to the Catholic Faith (non-catholic services, the Communist Part, free-masonry, "...


1

I don't know what a "small blue New Testament bible" is, but I suppose your principal was thinking about a translation. In Italy the Church uses the "CEI Edition", translated by Italian Episcopal Conference in 1978 and revised in 2008 and it's mandatory during official functions - but in informal occasions, sometimes we use other translations: I will not ...



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