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15

In essence, care should be taken lest the Sacrament of Confession be confused with psychological counseling. A priest with a degree in psychology should be sure not to confuse the spiritual purpose of the Sacrament with the therapeutic purpose of psychology. Therefore, the proper procedure would be for the priest to instruct the penitent to bring up his ...


12

Sin has consequences! "Sin has two consequences, or punishments (CCC 1472). The first is eternal punishment, in which the soul loses heaven and is confined to an eternity in hell. This punishment is remitted through the forgiveness of sins. The second is temporal punishment, in which a person must expiate, or make reparation for his sins. This temporal ...


9

For the Catholic Church and other Nicene churches (the Eastern Orthodox, the Oriental Orthodox, the Armenian Orthodox, the Assyrians; as well as the majority of Protestants), the divine name YHWH (which is closely linked to the expression “I am” or “I Am Who I Am” (see Ex. 3:14), applies to God in His divine nature—hence to all three Persons of the Trinity. ...


8

The official Catholic doctrine on the matter is in accord with a commonly held belief among nearly all Christians that Jesus was conceived within a virgin, and that the process by which this occurred was a mystery and a miracle. The heresies of the Psilanthropists and Adoptionists are notable early exceptions, and modern criticisms of the doctrine come ...


7

According to Roman Catholicism, believers receive these gifts at baptism, which are then made more perfect by the rite of Confirmation. Consider the Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 1285, "The reception of the sacrament of Confirmation is necessary for the completion of baptismal grace." For "by the sacrament of Confirmation, the baptized are ...


6

According to canon law on mixed marriages (i.e., marriages between a Catholic and non-Catholic), 1917 Can. 1060 … if there is a danger of perversion to the Catholic spouse and children, that marriage is forbidden even by divine law. Also—regarding the children, the procreation and education of whom is the primary purpose of marriage—it is required that ...


5

While it is not an absolute requirement that Catholics be confirmed before they are married in the Church, confirmation before marriage is something the Church strongly urges. The Code of Canon Law states: Catholics who have not yet received the sacrament of confirmation are to receive it before being admitted to marriage if this can be done without ...


5

No What is the Church's definition of a holy relic? "A relic is something connected with a saint or blessed, including a part of their body (e.g. hair or a piece of bone), their clothing, or an object that the person used or touched." Relics are classified into three categories: First Class Relics: items directly associated with the events of Christ's ...


5

Both the Gospel of Thomas and the Acts of Thomas are considered apocrypha by the Catholic Church and as such are not deemed to be part of the deposit of faith. No one can say with absolute confidence that St Thomas sailed to Muziris, India in 52 AD. Nevertheless both tradition and legend in this domain are believed by many of St Thomas Christians. Their ...


5

Muslims say that Christians changed the words of Jesus over time, hence inserted false statements into the Bible where Jesus claimed to be God. (See http://www.answering-islam.org/Morin/changed.html) This claim was made long ago, before the discoveries of ancient Bible manuscripts, hymnals, fragments, the Dead Sea Scrolls and other strong evidence that no ...


5

The ritual the O.P. is describing is a typical blessing of ordinary objects, of which there are many examples in the Shorter Roman Ritual, for example. (Keep in mind that there is no set “rite” for blessings of this kind—the ritual is indicative, not binding.) The blessing of a “normal” object does not turn it into a sacramental or (better said) a sacred ...


5

Caveat to this answer: Both priests gave you better pastoral guidance than you'll receive on an internet Q&A site. No, that 100% target isn't a critical milestone for a neophyte, which is the state you'll be in at the Easter Vigil. (One year won't do that volume justice in any case). If you are "on board" with 97% of the 2865 articles you are ...


5

It is a good when a new person comes into existence; God still creates a rational soul out of nothing even for those conceived as a result of sin. But it is never moral to use evil means in the case of IVF: depriving a child of his or her right to be conceived in an act of marital love masturbation to obtain semen killing many people by subjecting them ...


4

The answers to the O.P.'s questions are simple: No, the pronunciation of a word would not enter in any meaningful way into the contents of the faith. Faith has to do with God and those truths revealed by Him. (See Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 156.) The revelation of God as “I Am Who Am” (see Ex. 3:14), which is deeply linked to the Tetragrammaton, ...


4

Yes. The divine name applies to each of the persons of the Trinity. Matthew 28:19 is explicit that the name of the Trinity is one and the same. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, Matthew 28:19 (ESV) The name of God tells us about God's very being ...


4

For (1), you'll have to ask a question at Islam.SE. For (2), consider these paragraphs from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 104 In Sacred Scripture, the Church constantly finds her nourishment and her strength, for she welcomes it not as a human word, "but as what it really is, the word of God". "In the sacred books, the Father who is in heaven ...


4

Granmirupa, in fact you are wrong. There remain considerable differences between most who consider themselves "Anglo-catholic" and those who self identify as Catholic, other than whether the Archbishop of Canterbury, or the Bishop of Rome exercises authority over the church. One of the differences between [Roman] Catholics and Anglo-catholics is that it's ...


4

Your question really deals with that of all blessed objects. Holy water is a sacramental of the Catholic Church. Holy water should be treated like any other blessed sacramental object that is at our disposal! As Catholics, we are accustomed to having religious objects “blessed,” which signifies the permanent sanctification and dedication of an object ...


3

In essence, the Church’s answer is, “We do not know,” and there is no way of finding out. There is no official Church teaching regarding this question. (For a summary of the Church’s teaching on the Incarnation and what it entails, see Catechism of the Catholic Church [CCC] 456-483.) There is some room for speculation here, based on what we now know about ...


3

There are some obvious things that could be said about this question (the Bible citations for why anyone would do or not do these specific things are pretty easy). A few less obvious things to bring up with this question: Catholics (as do many Christians and non-Christians) value the virtue of prudence - it is not enough to know that a certain act is just, ...


3

Monica, generally speaking, there is are typical pathways under which a person who wanted to set up a community of like minded individuals could do so and get some sort of ecclesiastical recognition for the community. The way it would be most likely to happen would be that the person recruits others to join his community, then seeks ecclesiastical ...


3

Granmirupa is correct. Going to add a little more info. According to the St. Anthony Messenger: BOOK "According to Francis X. Weiser in the Handbook of Christian Feasts and Customs (Harcourt Brace), as late as 1952 Catholics in Central Europe brought wine and cider to church for blessing on the feast of St. John. They then took it home and some of them ...


3

The reason is: The Church provided a special blessing of wine in honor of the Saint. According to legend St. John drank a glass of poisoned wine without suffering harm because he had blessed it before he drank. The wine is also a symbol of the great love of Christ that filled St. John's heart with loyalty, courage and enthusiasm for his Master; ...


3

Even with some changes within some of the Anglican community (the Confession of St Louis, establishment of the Traditional Anglican Communion, or the Anglican Ordinariate per the link in @Geremia's answer) the differences are rooted in the original schism. The Schism in Brief The schism itself had as much to do with politics and culture as it did ...


3

The morality of an act depends on three things what is done (the object), why it is done (the intention) and the circumstances. 1750 The morality of human acts depends on: the object chosen; the end in view or the intention; the circumstances of the action. The object, the intention, and the circumstances make up the "sources," or ...


3

Sacramentals can lose their blessing for a number of reasons. "Items lose their blessing or consecration if they are desecrated, if they are substantially broken such that they can no longer be used for their sacred purpose, or if they are publicly sold. If an item is sold by one individual to another for only the price of the material itself, that is, ...


3

In creatures, relations are extrinsic to the essence of the creature. For example, my essence* is humanness, but my relation to my father, mother, wife, friends, or even to God is not humanness; it's not my essence. However, in the Holy Trinity, the Divine Relations are the essence of God Himself. This is a consequence of the Trinity being supremely simple. ...


3

In heaven we will still love God above all things, even our neighbor. The order of charity—that is, of supernatural love—will endure in heaven; the love of God must remain above all, even in heaven. Mt. 22:36-40 says that the greatest commandment is to love God, and the second greatest is like (but not identical) to it: to love one's neighbor as thyself. ...


2

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses the question "To whom should we give alms?" in Summa Theologica II-II q. 32 a. 9 c.: As Augustine says (De Doctr. Christ. i, 28), "it falls to us by lot, as it were, to have to look to the welfare of those who are more closely united to us." Nevertheless in this matter we must employ discretion, according to the various ...


2

The Tetragrammaton is not supposed to be pronounced, nor did Christians ever licitly pronounce it in the liturgy, according to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments's June 29, 2008, letter, summarized here: The letter from the Holy See explains that the Divine Name as revealed in the Old Testament, יהוה (YHWH), has ...



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