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14

From the PoV of the Roman Catholic church, baptism is a sacrament for the living. (For that matter, so are all 7 Sacraments). Once the body dies one is subject to judgment, which in the case of individuals is particular judgment. Put simply, we have our whole life to come to Jesus, to open ourselves to salvation, and to accept God's sanctifying Grace. To ...


7

The Essentials Marriage is a Sacrament. The Church has nothing to do with a divorce. (That's a civil matter). The passages in Matthew 19 and Mark 10 are pretty clear about Moses permitting divorce because the peoples' hearts had hardened, while the original law is that "two shall become one flesh" which Jesus pointedly reminds his audience. (You're ...


6

I'm fully aware that there are those who will fundamentally disagree with the Church on this point. However, I've attempted to present an objective account of the position the Church holds. The Church justifies it by saying that giving in to the temptation which the human condition provides, in defiance of the divine order which is present in male and ...


6

There are a number of aspects to the O.P.’s question, but it seems to center around the question, “Must the marital act be done for the sake of procreation?” or said in other words, “Must the couple have the intention to have a child whenever they perform the marital act?” The answer to that question is basically “no,” although the marital act must never be ...


5

People are not condemned, judged, or punished because they do not have faith in Jesus. They are condemned because of the evil acts they have committed during their life on Earth. They are saved from punishment by faith in Jesus, and (depending on your view on justification by faith alone or with works) by those works of righteousness that spring from that ...


4

Yes, absolutely. The depositum fidei is the fullness of God's Word contained in both Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. Christ has entrusted to the shepherds of God's people the task of interpreting His Word for the Church: Sacred tradition and Sacred Scripture form one sacred deposit of the word of God, committed to the Church. Holding fast to this ...


4

Priests and bishops of the Eastern Churches in full communion with the Bishop of Rome may concelebrate at any celebration of the Eucharist in any rite, including the Latin Rite, provided they have the permission of the diocesan bishop or eparch. The Code of Canon Law is silent on this issue, but the Code of Canons of Oriental Churches (CCEO) says, A ...


4

Granmirupa, in fact you are wrong. There remain considerable differences between most who consider themselves "Anglo-catholic" and those who self identify as Catholic, other than whether the Archbishop of Canterbury, or the Bishop of Rome exercises authority over the church. One of the differences between [Roman] Catholics and Anglo-catholics is that it's ...


4

According to canon law on mixed marriages (i.e., marriages between a Catholic and non-Catholic), 1917 Can. 1060 … if there is a danger of perversion to the Catholic spouse and children, that marriage is forbidden even by divine law. Also—regarding the children, the procreation and education of whom is the primary purpose of marriage—it is required that ...


4

Muslims say that Christians changed the words of Jesus over time, hence inserted false statements into the Bible where Jesus claimed to be God. (See http://www.answering-islam.org/Morin/changed.html) This claim was made long ago, before the discoveries of ancient Bible manuscripts, hymnals, fragments, the Dead Sea Scrolls and other strong evidence that no ...


4

The answers to the O.P.'s questions are simple: No, the pronunciation of a word would not enter in any meaningful way into the contents of the faith. Faith has to do with God and those truths revealed by Him. (See Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 156.) The revelation of God as “I Am Who Am” (see Ex. 3:14), which is deeply linked to the Tetragrammaton, ...


3

Short Answer Strictly speaking, the Church is as against sex among the non-married heterosexuals than it is against sex among non-married homosexuals. By teaching, the Church only accepts as correct sex between a man and a woman who are a married couple. All other sex is considered fornication, adultery, or a variety of other disordered acts. (Offenses ...


3

You state: ... if I were to have sex with my wife without the intention to procreate, it would be considered a sin by the Catholic Church. This is not actually the case. The Catholic Church recognizes that one of the goods of sexual activity is the increase in love and intimacy between the spouses—what it calls the unitive aspect of sex. The ...


3

The seventh candle seems to be the jurisdiction candle. The number of candles "at a pontifical high Mass, celebrated by the ordinary, seven candles are lighted. The seventh candle should be somewhat higher than the others, and should be placed at the middle of the altar in line with the other six. For this reason the altar crucifix is moved forward a ...


3

In order to answer this question, it is necessary to understand precisely what is meant by “conscience” and its relationship to human acts (that is, those actions that can be qualified as morally right or wrong). The Church, generally taking its cue from Medieval Scholasticism (see, e.g., Summa theologiae [S.Th.], Ia, q. 79, a. 13), defines the conscience ...


3

Those on earth do not know with certainty whether one is in hell, purgatory, or heaven—unless the Church has canonized the faithfully departed as a saint, in which case one is certain he or she is in heaven. Thus, Catholics pray for departed souls in the case they might be in purgatory: …the Catholic Church, instructed by the Holy Ghost, has, from the ...


3

Even with some changes within some of the Anglican community (the Confession of St Louis, establishment of the Traditional Anglican Communion, or the Anglican Ordinariate per the link in @Geremia's answer) the differences are rooted in the original schism. The Schism in Brief The schism itself had as much to do with politics and culture as it did ...


3

The reason is: The Church provided a special blessing of wine in honor of the Saint. According to legend St. John drank a glass of poisoned wine without suffering harm because he had blessed it before he drank. The wine is also a symbol of the great love of Christ that filled St. John's heart with loyalty, courage and enthusiasm for his Master; ...


3

Granmirupa is correct. Going to add a little more info. According to the St. Anthony Messenger: BOOK "According to Francis X. Weiser in the Handbook of Christian Feasts and Customs (Harcourt Brace), as late as 1952 Catholics in Central Europe brought wine and cider to church for blessing on the feast of St. John. They then took it home and some of them ...


3

For (1), you'll have to ask a question at Islam.SE. For (2), consider these paragraphs from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 104 In Sacred Scripture, the Church constantly finds her nourishment and her strength, for she welcomes it not as a human word, "but as what it really is, the word of God". "In the sacred books, the Father who is in heaven ...


2

Not prior to the 2nd century, mainly since the catacombs were not developed until then. While there are various Christian frescos in these underground tombs which demonstrate a devotion to the saints, including the Virgin Mary, the time period for their origin would be no earlier than the late 2nd century or early 3rd, for even though Christians ...


2

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia article for the Doxology, it was used at least as early as the fourth century "as a protest against Arian subordination. The article goes on to say that in the West, the Latin version was put into a canonical form at the Fourth Synod of Toledo in 633.


2

The following website is the most complete source of Catholic saints I know to exist: Catholic Saints Info. Not only is this site constantly being updated, but it also show the reader other sources of information, variations of saints' name, but it even shows particular (local) feasts of saints such as translations, if applicable. The ultimate "List of ...


2

The Catholic Church believes that souls who die in the state of grace, yet still need to be purified from the temporal punishment due to sin are purified in Purgatory. Catholic teaching regarding prayers of the dead is bound up inseparably with the doctrine of purgatory and the more general doctrine of the communion of the saints, which is an article of the ...


2

Yes, a non Catholic can confess to a Catholic priest. (The canon law point has already been addressed). What the non Catholic is not generally eligible for is the full sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation.; thus the priest cannot grant you absolution.1 Our priest makes that clear to folks who are married to Catholics but who aren't of that ...


2

I think if you observe your quotes closely, your answer is revealed within them. Notice in the John passage Jesus states, for I did not come to condemn the world. When was it that he had said this, it was in his incarnation, his first arrival to earth, to carry out his salvific act, the act that would allow reconciliation to all who would place their trust ...


2

The Haydock Commentary on that verse says: Ver. 47. I do not judge him. To judge here, may signify to condemn. St. Augustine expounds it in this manner: I do not judge him at this my first coming. St. Chrysostom says, it is not I only that judgeth him, but the works also that I do. Thus, during His 1st coming He doesn't judge, but he certainly will at ...


2

It is rare but under certain circumstances a Latin Rite priest may be married. Usually this occurs when a Priest/Minister from Lutheran or Episcopal church petitions Rome (local Bishop) to become Catholic and at the same time remain/become ordained as a Latin Rite priest. This usually occurs due to great upset in a church - such as German Lutheran pastors ...


2

This might not really answer your question, but the first thing that popped up into my head was the Book of Revelations. John has a series of visions and one of the symbols used is the Seven Candlesticks. Revelations 1:12 :- "And I turned to see the voice that spake with me. And being turned, I saw seven golden candlesticks;" According to the Zondervan KJV ...


2

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass: Dogmatically, Liturgically and Ascetically Explained (1902) by Fr. Nikolaus Gihr writes in the first footnote of §32, "The Language Used in the Celebration of the Holy Mass" (p. 319-328): Whether the Apostles celebrated the Holy Sacrifice in the language of each individual nation or only in the Aramean (Syro-Chaldaic), ...



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