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No, the Church does not have a separatist attitude toward science. There have been periods in which, admittedly, some persons in the hierarchy of the Church have viewed the natural sciences with a certain suspicion (one thinks of the condemnation of Galileo), but such an attitude has neither been the norm nor is it compatible with Church teaching. ...


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There are claims made by Hugh Ross and others that the Catholic Church endorses the "non-overlapping magesteria" model for the relationship between science and religion. A problem with these claims is that the Church rarely ties itself down to a non-negotiable position as clearly as this. The result is that these specific claims are liable to be ...


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The "'non-overlapping magesteria' model for the relationship between science and religion" is not Catholic. In fact, it is condemned as a part of the heresy of Modernism, what Pope St. Pius X called the "synthesis of all heresies" in his 1907 encyclical condemning Modernism, Pascendi Dominici gregis (my emphases):Faith and Science 16. Having reached this ...


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I will come back to add more references, but the topic of faith and science comes up in many of Bishop Robert Barron videos, talks and posts. From this paragraph, it seems that the answer is in some sense in support of the non-overlapping magesteria: The obvious success of the physical sciences—evident in the technology that surrounds us and facilitates ...


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In traditional Catholic parlance, “affectivity” refers to the passions (in modern parlance: generally feelings or emotions) of love that one person might experience for another. It is roughly a synonym for the modern term “affection.” We can see this usage, for example, in St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae, I-IIae, q. 22, a. 2, sed contra: Sed contra ...



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