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17

There are a host of references to capital punishment in the Bible - the first of which is in Genesis shortly after the Flood in Genesis 9:6: Whoever sheds man's blood, by man his blood shall be shed, for in the image of God He made man. Christ did not condemn the Roman soldiers for executing the thieves who were crucified with Him. Paul does not deny ...


17

Solomon married his concubines, so he wasn't practicing adultery - just polygamy, which was not forbidden. David murdered Uriah, but did it by proxy. He did not kill Uriah, rather he set up a situation in which he would fall in battle. Beyond that, yes David "killed his ten thousands," but did so in battle, and thus it isn't murder. And as Caleb pointed ...


13

Yes, there was a special provision. God personally enacted a punishment. In the case of David, God caused his son to die and did not permit him to be the one to build the temple. 2 Samuel 12:14 (ESV) Nevertheless, because by this deed you have utterly scorned the Lord, the child who is born to you shall die. 1 Chronicles 28:3 (ESV) But God said ...


11

There is an interesting passage in the Pentateuch: “If a bull gores a man or woman to death, the bull is to be stoned to death, and its meat must not be eaten. But the owner of the bull will not be held responsible. If, however, the bull has had the habit of goring and the owner has been warned but has not kept it penned up and it kills a man or woman, ...


11

There is no verse in the New Testament stating that we need to punish "heretics". Quite the contrary. In James 4:12 (NIV) it says: There is only one Lawgiver and Judge, the one who is able to save and destroy. But you--who are you to judge your neighbor? Matthew 5:43-48 (NIV): "You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your ...


7

There's a scholarly article on the Inquisitions at a rather surprising website. It says... (From Deuteronomy 13 NIV) "If a prophet, or one who foretells by dreams, appears among you... and he says, 'Let us follow other gods'... That prophet or dreamer must be put to death... You must purge the evil from among you. If your very own brother, or your ...


6

There are several different sets of rules for different communities of monks; and the specific penalties for the monks are dependent on the rule. Most communities of monks or nuns are governed by one of two sets of rules: the Rule of St. Augustine (of Hippo), and the Rule of St. Benedict (of Nursia). There are also governing documents such as the Statutes ...


6

Here are some interpretive options that are valid in Catholicism as well as many other, but not all, Christian denominations. Firstly, we don't need to rule out the possibility that the OT laws in question are perfectly just. But, we also know that God prefers mercy to justice; justice is the bare minimum. And, we can see this concept in Jesus' explanation ...


5

The topic of the law in relation to the Gospel is one of the most discussed ones in the entire history of theology. The space here is not sufficient for arguing one view as opposed to the other. I am going to answer your question with a simple "yes", though. Sometimes a contextless, literalistic application of Old Testament law is in fact sinful, and I am ...


5

Your real question is really why do the sins in these three instances deserve Death in God's eyes? Leviticus 20:13, Exodus 35:2, Deuteronomy 21:18-21. The answer to that is the same as why God demanded death for when Adam and Eve disobeyed God, and ate from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Genesis 2:17 KJV But of the tree of the ...


4

The severity of the punishment matches the severity of the crime, that's all. For Israel to keep a holy God in her midst who will provide her with plenty of rain and abundant crops, health and well-being, protection in all warfare, bravery and courage in its citizens, much healthy offspring, and so on (Deuteronomy 28), will demand high standards on the ...


4

Many scholars question the authenticity of the Pericope Adulterae (the section of scripture you cited in the original post). http://bible.org/article/my-favorite-passage-that%E2%80%99s-not-bible Professor Daniel Wallace writes, For a long time, biblical scholars have recognized the poor textual credentials of the story of the woman caught in adultery ...


3

To answer the O.P.'s question directly, the maximum penalty for breaking monastic vows is essentially expulsion from the monastery (which entails a dispensation from the vows). For the benefit of readers, in the Catholic Church, “monks” are those men who live in a monastic community, which entails a certain separation from the world and a dedication to ...


3

This question isn't really a Christian doctrinal question, I think. But, the most obvious answer here is that they were both kings. And the literal letter of God's law is always enacted by people (like the King's army or guards), who are generally under the rule of the king -- notably as a sort of proxy for God in the case of the Jews. So, the king probably ...


3

In John 7:53-8:11, a crowd of men who are about to stone an adulteress to death, fulfilling the Law of Moses, are stopped when Jesus condemns them by asking for the one without sin to go ahead and cast the first stone. Additionally, Matt. 7:1-2 states: Do not judge, or you too will be judged. 2 For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, ...


3

Genesis 9:5 does say that animals are held responsible but I would say that this does not mean heaven or hell. A lot of the punishments in the Torah that are meted out are of the earthly origin. As Exodus 21:28-29 (mentioned by rajah9) makes it very clear, this punishment is of an earthly nature. I don't think these texts are talking about heaven or hell at ...


2

How many they killed is not easy to know in absence of any historical records. They must have killed many and they did conspire to kill these three prominent ones and few more.The Sanhedrin did not have the power under Roman authority to put someone to death (Jn 18:31). This power was supposedly revoked in 30 A.D. But that did not keep them from hatching ...


2

The stoning of the Sabbath breaker is a good example to show how the laws of Moses were very different from ANE laws, as well as different from the New Testament economy: While the people of Israel were in the wilderness, they found a man gathering sticks on the Sabbath day. And those who found him gathering sticks brought him to Moses and Aaron and to ...


2

Henry Chadwick translates the relevant passage: A man enjoying a reputation for eloquence takes his position before a human judge with a crowd of men standing round and attacks his opponent with ferocious animosity. He is extremely vigilant in precautions against some error in language, but is indifferent to the possibility that the emotional force of ...


2

Exodus 22:18 famously says: Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. Without a doubt, this was the basis of the belief that witches should be put to death. The Calvinist Bible commentator Matthew Henry says about this verse ("our law" refers to the law of Britain and Wales): Witchcraft not only gives that honour to the devil which is due to God ...


2

Both the Gospels and the Epistles repeatedly establish the New Covenant as a non-legalistic relationship with God --a new relationship not founded in following specific rules. However, as Paul says, not everything that is allowed is beneficial. As a Christian, you need to be guided by your relationship with Christ and by a spirit of discernment to ...


1

Just some thoughts, many of the priests, teachers of theology and the high priest during Jesus' time thought Jesus was a heretic. It was the established church that put Jesus to death, even the pagan Pilate said "I find no fault in Him". The very individual that was sent to save them, they crucified and closed the door of their own salvation. If there was ...


1

In Matt 5:17 Christ is recorded as saying: "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. A second point to consider is that of the idea of dispensationalism, which (in a very brief nutshell) is the idea that we (humans) have lived under different dispensations or covenant styles of ...


1

It depends on which part you are talking about. The Catholic position is that the Old Law ended and it is now unacceptable to follow its religious ceremonies, however, there are certain parts of the Old Law which are still in force, for example, "Thou shalt not steal" remains applicable. Pope Eugene IV, Council of Florence, 1441, “The Holy Roman ...


1

In Christian ethics, animals are not considered free moral agents , and therefore are not culpable for their actions (here is an article about moral agency in general). Humans, as free moral agents, are able to choose between right and wrong and therefor be punished or rewarded for their choices. I think one way of interpreting this verse is that it is not ...


1

None of these answers address the apparent conflict of a just king who is above the law and not accountable to its penalties- even to God. They also seem to underestimate the commitment of the Hebrew people to justice and impartiality of the law (we can't conclude that the courts contemporary to David's rule were corrupt), and disregard that the law was both ...


1

There needed to be two or three witnesses for such a one to be pronounced guilty and sentenced to death; one witness was not enough for the death penalty Numbers 35:30 Whoever kills a person, the murderer shall be put to death on the testimony of witnesses; but one witness is not sufficient testimony against a person for the death penalty (nkjv). ...



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