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When I first read your question my immediate thought was it is not what is said here that shows the conflict with Calvinism but what is 'not said'. Interestingly enough I was trying to find proof of this impression and found the very same observation made my a modern Remonstrant with respect to the seventh article of the Methodist church. Original sin ...


5

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


5

The doctrine of Prevenient Grace is seen by those who adhere to it as a natural outcome of sound Biblical exegesis. In one respect it's akin to the doctrine of the Trinity in that it resolves apparent discrepancies. With the Trinity, we have clear teachings in Scripture that there is only one God, other clear teachings that Jesus is God, and others ...


4

From Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion, Book 2, Chapter 2, Section 4 Moreover although the Greek Fathers, above others, and especially Chrysostom, have exceeded due bounds in extolling the powers of the human will, yet all ancient theologians, with the exception of Augustine, are so confused, vacillating, and contradictory on this subject, ...


4

It's probably important to emphasize here that Calvin, as far as I know (and I think we are in agreement on this point), did not believe "Original Sin" to have been completely absolved by the birth of Christ. Indeed it was also in Romans(9:18-23) that one of the early Calvinists' favorite quotes appears: Therefore God has mercy on whom he wants to have ...


4

Whether or not you'll find a theology that rejects everything in Calvinism and Arminianism is going to depend on how broadly you define those terms (as Calvinism can also encompass such issues as infant baptism, eschatology, and the relation of the OT civil law and modern day governance). But the closest you'll find (at least in matters of salvation) is ...


4

Baptists have historically combined the two perspectives as described in this answer. While the terms "General" and "Particular" Baptists don't have as wide a currency as they once did, they speak to the strains, as I described here: Eventually, there were two main camps of Baptists - "General" Baptists who believed in General atonement, i.e. anyone who ...


4

There are a few that attempt to do so. Both Calvinists and Arminians would say that any such attempt is internally inconsistent. I don't know of any "universally acknowledged system" of theology that does so, except perhaps for Amyraldism, which denies limited atonement but affirms the other four points of Calvinism. (Any Protestant denying a point of ...


3

Augustine is certainly the major patristic source that Calvin uses, for all topics. For his use of the Fathers in general, he was not particularly invested in finding out what they believed: the witness of Scripture was paramount. He did not take the practice of the Church in that era as normative. In his use of Augustine, Calvin wished to insulate himself ...


3

The note for John 5:29 in the John MacArthur NASB Study Bible (MacArthur is Calvinist) says: Jesus was not teaching for justification by works (see 6:29). In the context, the "good" is believing on the Son so as to receive a new nature that produces good works (3:21; Jas 2:14-20), while the "evil" done is to reject the Son (the unsaved) and hate the ...


3

I am understanding your use of the word prevenient grace to be not only God's influence upon men before actual justification but also joined with the assumption that his intended influence upon men to draw them to salvation by the Holy Spirit can be rejected and is resistible. In this sense the grace you imagine is something opposed to Calvinism. To answer ...


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The idea that God draws and offers salvation to all men, not only a chosen elect, comes from passages such as John 3:16-21 (emphasis mine (note that this passage can just as easily support a Calvinist view)) - “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send ...


2

I had to research this more before answering. I had never heard of the term before. Really what you are looking for then is "Do you believe that God draws us to him with Holy spirit?". I am no expert on the matter, but with my knowledge of the scriptures my answer is an emphatic yes! God is known to draw those who have qualities he desires. He opens their ...


2

The reformed view would believe both those types of verses you have quoted but would add a third type to ensure the whole picture in presented: "For many are called, but few are chosen." (ESV Matt 22:14) So what we have are three things: God offers the gospel to all Only some respond Those who do respond are 'the elect' God is sovereign in his ...


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A typical reformed response on this statement would be like that found in Matthew 22:14 “For many are invited, but few are chosen.” A typical reformed expositor writes: The gospel call goes forth far and wide. It reaches ever so many. Most of them are like the man in the parable: they hear but do not heed. In comparison with those many that are lost ...


2

To my understanding, covenant theology is a lens through which to interpret scripture and understand it. It appears from the answer below that this way of interpreting and understanding scripture encompasses the traditionally understood purpose behind Jesus' death with the institution of the New Covenant [NT]. What is Covenant Theology in Reformed ...


2

Isn't the point of Christ that we were formerly unable through our goodness (lack of it) to initiate a relation with God, so that Christ's role was to initiate this relation, to create this mediation? And once that is in effect, we have the choice to accept this relation or reject it? Isn't the point of Christianity precisely that since we cannot merit ...


1

The eastern Othordox view of original sin is just like the Roman Catholic view. Calvinism is very different. They key difference between the two views is that for Calvin, Luther and the reformers, an infinite transaction occurs in a single moment when a sinner believes in Christ. At this moment all guilt for sin is removed for all past, present and ...


1

The confusion is predestination vs. foreknowledge. There is a definite gap in God's thinking, and our thinking (The Bible clearly states this). When God/Jesus Christ says something at a moment (which we cannot fathom at the moment), they (God/Jesus Christ) have infinity of before/after. For example Moses thought that God was behind Pharaoh's actions, whereas ...


1

The answer to your "conundrum" is found in the nature of God. God may accommodate Himself to time, but He is also the creator of time. Unlike us, God exists in the eternal present. "I AM THAT I AM," He revealed to Moses, when Moses inquired of the LORD as to who shall he tell his fellow Israelites had chosen him to be their leader: The "I AM THAT I ...


1

Some older puritan writers used to talk about a sinner being awakened (not saved, just awakened). This would involve conviction of sin. It is pertinent to the discussion on pre-venient grace (as in the question) as this was the term used by the Puritans for it. e.g. from John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress (emphasis mine): 'This miry Slough is such a place as ...


1

Calvinism is historically linked with covenant theology, which stresses St. Paul's account of God's plan in the New Testament: the promise was given to Abraham and his Seed through faith and that promise belongs to all the people of God through Christ. Faithful people of the Old Testament era did not receive the entirety of what God promised because only ...


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Apostle Paul is speaking to a predominately Jewish Church in the 1st Century and his teachings were in some capacity to unite the Jew and the Gentile in the church by removing the prejudices and presuppositions of the Jews converts who thought salvation was for the Jew only and not the Gentile. It was no small revelation that the gentiles like the Jews had ...


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In Summa Theologica (1.19.6.1), Thomas Aquinas wrote, Objection 1: It seems that the will of God is not always fulfilled. For the Apostle says (1 Tim. 2:4): "God will have all men to be saved, and to come to the knowledge of the truth." But this does not happen. Therefore the will of God is not always fulfilled. Reply to Objection 1: ...Thirdly, ...


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You may be interested in an obscure passage in Isaiah that speaks to the issue of how Christ protects his bride, the body of Christ. In Isaiah 26:19-21 ESV, we read: "(19)Your dead shall live; their bodies shall rise. You who dwell in the dust, awake and sing for joy! For your dew is a dew of light, and the earth will give birth to the dead. (20)Come ...



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