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The TULIP acronym is intended to define the Calvinist position - however it is not intended to define that position relative to non-Christians, it is intended to define it relative to other Christians. It doesn't include doctrines that are considered basic to Christianity, or Protestantism. So you will find no emphasis on: Necessity of faith; Primacy of ...


6

Yes, salvation can still be considered a gift. In general, something can be considered a gift if it: Is positive/desirable Is given rather than earned (otherwise it should be called a wage) Is given without obligation of repayment (otherwise it should be called a loan) Whether a gift can be resisted or not has no bearing on its "giftiness". According ...


6

The important thing to remember is that each of the items in TULIP was a response to the (Arminian) Remonstrants own five point rejection of Calvinism. Thus the simple reason why faith is omitted is because the Remonstrants weren't critiquing the place of faith, per se, but the place of grace in salvation. Because TULIP is a response to a critique, the ...


5

John Piper is a Five Point Calvinist. From the limited atonement section of Bethlehem Baptist Church's doctrinal position "What We Believe About the Five Points of Calvinism" (compiled by Piper and "the Council of Elders"): On the other hand we do not limit the power and effectiveness of the atonement. We simply say that in the cross God had in view the ...


4

The TULIP from Calvinism is derived from this one principle that is hard to deny if you are a Bible believing Christian: God has complete sovereignty over all that is. The logic that Calvinists take after that consideration does not lead them to list faith as a major point, nor does it require them to do so. The faith of the individual is covered under ...


4

Calvinism relies heavily on the following statement: Grace (specifically the grace provided via Christ's death) is sufficient for the salvation of all, but it is efficient for the salvation of some. This is essentially all that stands between Calvinism and Universalism. The idea behind Calvinism is that Christ's grace is so powerful that if one is ...


4

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


3

It's probably important to emphasize here that Calvin, as far as I know (and I think we are in agreement on this point), did not believe "Original Sin" to have been completely absolved by the birth of Christ. Indeed it was also in Romans(9:18-23) that one of the early Calvinists' favorite quotes appears: Therefore God has mercy on whom he wants to have ...


3

I am understanding your use of the word prevenient grace to be not only God's influence upon men before actual justification but also joined with the assumption that his intended influence upon men to draw them to salvation by the Holy Spirit can be rejected and is resistible. In this sense the grace you imagine is something opposed to Calvinism. To answer ...


3

The doctrine of Prevenient Grace is seen by those who adhere to it as a natural outcome of sound Biblical exegesis. In one respect it's akin to the doctrine of the Trinity in that it resolves apparent discrepancies. With the Trinity, we have clear teachings in Scripture that there is only one God, other clear teachings that Jesus is God, and others ...


3

The idea that God draws and offers salvation to all men, not only a chosen elect, comes from passages such as John 3:16-21 (emphasis mine (note that this passage can just as easily support a Calvinist view)) - “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send ...


3

The reason these two are seldom found together seems to be primarily because of the difference of the view of the church between covenant theology and dispensationalism. Although some (like MacArthur) continue to maintain the distinction between the church and Israel (as in dispensationalism), most 5 point Calvinists follow covenant theology which denies ...


3

From Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion, Book 2, Chapter 2, Section 4 Moreover although the Greek Fathers, above others, and especially Chrysostom, have exceeded due bounds in extolling the powers of the human will, yet all ancient theologians, with the exception of Augustine, are so confused, vacillating, and contradictory on this subject, ...


3

There is no doubt but that Spurgeon was a five point Calvinist: http://weecalvin1509.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/chsindex.html Spurgeon's own quotes affirming all the 5 points together and each of the 5 points individually. As for Andrew Fuller - In the foreward of his book on the Sovereignty of God, AW Pink described Fuller as "eminent and honored." See: ...


3

I'd like to preface my answer by asserting that: Any systematic theology will fail to some degree to sum up the totality of God's revealed will in scripture. Hyper-Calvinism is generally speaking an ill-defined term. It is more usually used as an invective to disparage those who deviate from whatever flavour of Calvinism one adheres to, or as a bogey-man ...


3

Lutherans who hold to their confessions [ http://bookofconcord.org/ ] believe that justification, faith, and baptism go together. A baptized infant believes the Gospel at its baptism. An adult who falls away from faith in Christ which has been given in Baptism and is converted is returning to the promise of the Gospel which has been applied to him in ...


3

1,000 years before John Calvin was an idea. After His apologetic battle with Pelagius. Augustine wrote a book called On Grace and Free Will. This was necessitated by two extremes that he saw and had concluded (in agreement with all the fathers before him) that both extremes were in error and he would not be accused (as some were saying) that because of his ...


2

No difference. On the doctrines or original sin and justification by faith Wesleyan and Calvinism seem to run a course along the same stream. Wesley's view of original sin is made clear with few words in a sermon entitled 'SERMON 44 ORIGINAL SIN'. This sermon on its own clearly shows that Wesley taught the same doctrine as the Protestant reformers, ...


2

The same issues with respect to God's Kingdom and prayer (as well as evangelism and other human activities) apply to (ordinary) Calvinism. In general such issues are simply explained by the fact that human beings are acting within time and that human actions are intermediate causes. This means that the prayer of the righteous is effective, that God ordained ...


2

Short Answer: John Piper is clearly a five-point Calvinist. There appears to be no valid reason to think he is a four-point Calvinist. More Information: There are a number of places on the web that claim that John Piper denies the doctrine of limited atonement -- the "L" in "TULIP," the acronym associated with five-point Calvinism. It appears that none of ...


2

I had to research this more before answering. I had never heard of the term before. Really what you are looking for then is "Do you believe that God draws us to him with Holy spirit?". I am no expert on the matter, but with my knowledge of the scriptures my answer is an emphatic yes! God is known to draw those who have qualities he desires. He opens their ...


2

It seems the answers here created this question. In Calvinism the grace is that God gives you faith, which then saves you. You are elected to receive that grace without condition. Nothing you do, could do, have done, or anything to do with you or your actions was weighed in determining your election. That is why is is called unconditional election. That ...


1

Technically, Reformed Theology does not exclude liberty from sovereignty. Quoting from The Westminster Confession of Faith, Chapter III, point I: I. God from all eternity, did, by the most wise and holy counsel of His own will, freely, and unchangeably ordain whatsoever comes to pass; yet so, as thereby neither is God the author of sin, nor is violence ...


1

Some older puritan writers used to talk about a sinner being awakened (not saved, just awakened). This would involve conviction of sin. It is pertinent to the discussion on pre-venient grace (as in the question) as this was the term used by the Puritans for it. e.g. from John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress (emphasis mine): 'This miry Slough is such a place as ...


1

Augustine is certainly the major patristic source that Calvin uses, for all topics. For his use of the Fathers in general, he was not particularly invested in finding out what they believed: the witness of Scripture was paramount. He did not take the practice of the Church in that era as normative. In his use of Augustine, Calvin wished to insulate himself ...


1

One reason could be that Reformed doctrine takes covenantal thinking into account; this allows for quite a bit of continuity between the two Testaments, with also some very distinct discontinuities. Reformed doctrine, for example, would see the covenants in the OT as building, one upon the other, in scope, until you have the New Covenant with Jesus Christ, ...


1

I would argue there is no synergism whatsoever in justification. The natural man, the Bible points out, is not sick and needing a doctor. He is dead and needs resurrection. Dead people don't raise themselves. They need to be raised (passive voice very intentional here). Therefore, the Holy Spirit must raise people from the dead and give them a new heart. ...


1

Calvinism is historically linked with covenant theology, which stresses St. Paul's account of God's plan in the New Testament: the promise was given to Abraham and his Seed through faith and that promise belongs to all the people of God through Christ. Faithful people of the Old Testament era did not receive the entirety of what God promised because only ...


1

Both versions of the atonement here considered are limited -- Calvinists limit it in scope (or recipients), while non-Calvinists limit it in power (or efficacy). It's not a matter of whether it is limited, but rather how it is limited. In the scriptures, Christ was spoken of as the last Adam, a title which confers universality (in the same way that the ...


1

You may be interested in an obscure passage in Isaiah that speaks to the issue of how Christ protects his bride, the body of Christ. In Isaiah 26:19-21 ESV, we read: "(19)Your dead shall live; their bodies shall rise. You who dwell in the dust, awake and sing for joy! For your dew is a dew of light, and the earth will give birth to the dead. (20)Come ...



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