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26

It should be noted that Luther and Calvin thought pretty highly of one another, despite their disagreements. Also keep in mind that when Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door, Calvin was less than 10 years old. It must also be remembered that a lot of what is taught under the banner of "Calvinism" today was not necessarily taught nor believed by Calvin, ...


12

I cannot find a reference that he did, but it's possible he may have on a specific issue. From my research there is no evidence that he every called Calvin "the son of the Devil" and in fact those are Calvin's words, not Luther's. Let's get some facts. Calvin and Luther were contemporaries, both living in Europe during the early to mid 1500s. However, ...


9

Calvin did not like appealing to any tradition or authority other than Scripture. He asserts that the Bible teaches that all have sinned and that all continue to sin, and on that basis each facet of Mariology falls down like dominoes (except perpetual virginity, which he neither defends nor denies based on what he perceives as Scriptural silence). He may ...


9

Martin Luther and John Calvin followed the tradition of St. Augustine in abhorring any theoretical belief in a state of sinlessness, whether for a moment, day, year, or whatever. They seem to have regarded sinless perfection as the vain imagination of human pride and a result of our sinfulness.  For example, commenting on Psalms  106:6, Calvin said: How ...


7

More or less, yes, but the question is slightly misleading by the word 'only' (but about that later). As this discussion is so complex and visited by so many people with so many quotations, etc., I prefer to try and give you a summary view from many years studying many books on the subject. Mine is not the 'only view' but really on this question you can ...


6

I'm pretty sure Wesley and Calvin did not actually believe that Jesus is Michael. Those two quotations you gave only show that in the verses they referred to, Michael typifies Christ, just as in many other places. Ie. Jonah typified Christ, or "you may refer Jonah in his being in the belly of the fish for 3 days and 3 nights as the person of Christ, who died ...


3

If you look at Calvin's commentary on Jude 9 you'll see nothing at all that suggests he thought that Michael is Jesus. Indeed, no one who has read Jude 9 could think so (except perhaps if they denied Jesus' divinity.) Wesley wrote about Jude 9 too.


2

Thanks to Adithia for a stimulating question, and Mr. Bultitude for a thorough and impressive reply. It seems to me that the Calvinists resolutely deny that there were two personae or prosopa in Christ, but still end up with two hypostases in that they treat the natures as acting subjects. This seems to me to be a weakness of the Western Aristotelian ...


2

No, Calvin was not Nestorian. This can be concluded on the strength of the following evidence: His defense of the Chalcedonian Definition and rejection of Nestorius Related to the above, reformed theology's rejection of icons of Christ on the basis of the unity of the natures His implicit acceptance of the reality described in the term theotokos, and his ...


2

What was predestination according to Calvin? Predestination According to Calvin According to John Calvin, predestination is God’s unchangeable decree from before the creation of the world that he would freely save some people (the elect), foreordaining them to eternal life, while the others (the reprobate) would be “barred from access to” ...


2

For Calvin himself, I think the answer is a qualified "yes" - qualified, because his views should be distinguished from a merely mechanistic view of what determinism means (as if the unfolding of time was just a physical system, nothing to do with God). Calvin saw the action of God at work in all things: With regard to inanimate objects, again we must ...


2

I'd say yes. Though it may seem a cop-out, there does seem to be some philosophical distinction between hard- and soft-determinism, though, and I think most mainline Calvinists would affirm Compatabilism. By definition, Compatabilism takes a syncretic view of determinism and free agency. So, yes, determinism is part of the equation, but it's not quite ...


1

Your quote describing predestinarianism is clearly referring to a certain interpretation of Romans 9. Romans 9, after all, uses similar verbiage: You will say to me then, “Why [then] does he still find fault? For who can oppose his will?” But who indeed are you, a human being, to talk back to God? Will what is made say to its maker, “Why have you ...


1

Calvin's involvements and even leadership in having a man guilty of heresy put to death according to the civil laws of his day does not seem something that can be denied based on his personal letters. Here is the one most often quoted as the strongest recorded statement from Calvin on the Servetus affair is a 1561 letter from Calvin to the Marquis Paet, ...


1

Kind of simple but I think the best way of understanding Calvinism with respect to God's immutable absolute free will and the tiny free will he gave men is like this: The history of mankind was predetermined like a ship starting at London and arriving at New York. On the ship are puny humans like grasshoppers who can do whatever they want but they can't ...



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