Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

42

Being a speaker of a minority language, I can state one good reason and many -- well, not so good ones. The good reason Language changes. In some languages, you only have different Bible translations for this reason: the translations are temporally spaced maybe a hundred years apart. Look at 2 Timothy 2:15 in different English translations: The ...


27

Yes, it is absolutely possible for editions of the Bible to contain errors. There is no magical mechanism to prevent this. There are some notorious printing mistakes, for example: A 1631 printing of the King James version is now called the "Wicked Bible", owing to its rendering of Exodus 20:14, Thou shalt commit adultery In 1763, the "Fool's Bible" ...


19

Christians, in general, do not believe that Jesus' name is 'magic', in the sense that if you say the word your prayer is somehow more effective. The exact version of the name used is not therefore important. "In my name", as Jesus says, can mean a number of things including "with my authority" and "in accordance with my wishes". It's true that Yeshua is ...


18

They are transliterated from two different languages: Hebrew and Greek. מִרְיָם -- Miriam Μαρία -- Maria יְהוֹשֻׁעַ‎‎ -- Joshua Ἰησοῦς -- Jesus The transliterations make sense when compared to the original pronunciations. Of course Mary and Jesus must actually have had Hebrew/Aramaic names instead of Greek ones. Quite probably their names actually were ...


17

That's a very tricky question which deserves some bullet points. The scripture used during Mass and liturgical events and prayers (Benediction, Liturgy of the Hours) should always come from the Vulgate (Latin) Bible. In the United States we use the older New American Bible, with the revised edition waiting in the wings to be implemented at some future date ...


16

The short answer to the question is: in museums and libraries throughout the world. The sheer number of fragments alone means that no one academic entity - let alone even one government or ecclesiastical authority - can "own" them all. There are over 5500 manuscripts, miniscules, unicals, papyri, parchments, and fragments that critical scholars have used ...


15

The different between the Quran and the Christian Bible is that the Islam teaches that the Quran was dictated in Arabic and written down - in only one language and thus saying and reading it in this language is deemed more valuable. The Christian bible was written by men, inspired by God, having their own style, grammar and vocabularly. i.e. the greek of ...


15

It is important to understand that we do not have an "original copy" of any book of the Bible. What we have are copies of copies of copies... (manuscripts), from which "Textual Critics" seek to ascertain the original wording. It is the original wording that most Bible scholars hold to be perfect and inspired by God. Many modern Christians view "The Bible" ...


14

The commands God gave to Ancient Israel are normally divided into three kinds: moral, civil and ceremonial. This question and this question have more information. This one, and any of the others invoking the death penalty, certainly fall into the 'civil' category. The state of Israel (loosely speaking) would have the authority to impose the death penalty for ...


14

The first five books are closely linked together - they are the "Torah" (Hebrew for "teaching" or "instruction") traditionally attributed to Moses. This explains why they can be called "The Five Books of Moses"; the Greek "Pentateuch" means "five books" and is another title for this section of the Bible. Calling the books after Moses makes sense, and avoids ...


14

One of the reasons for the variance in names is that languages often don't share the same sounds as Greek or Hebrew. For instance, Russian has no "th" sound. Consequently, the sound of that name cannot be reproduced in Russian. In Greek, it is ματθαιος, or /Mat-thaios/. Russian translates this as Матфей, or Matfay. So, the "th" becomes an "f". Also, ...


13

The King James Version or Authorized Version as it was originally known, was translated by a group of 47 scholars. It was actually a thought-for-thought translation, rather than word-for-word translation. The idea is that they tried to take the original meaning of the text (not just the individual word) and translate that into the (then) common language. ...


13

From the ESV Wikipedia link (emphasis added): The result is a translation that is more literal than the popular New International Version, but more idiomatic than the New American Standard Bible. That's probably the main difference. So ESV is going to be more literal, less figurative and free from exaggeration/embellishment in it's translations and is ...


13

Yes, they do. It's called New World Translation. There are several verses with a completely different meaning than other translations, such as John 1:1 1 In [the] beginning the Word was, and the Word was with God, and the Word was a god Quite different than the NIV translation 1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the ...


13

The most word used is "porneia" (πορνεία), and according to Strong's means "illicit sexual intercourse" - particularly fornication, or sexual intercourse outside marriage. This of course is the real point here - Paul isn't slamming sexual desire and intercourse as a bad thing - look at Song of Solomon. What he is warning against is sex in the absence of the ...


12

Referencing the wikipedia article: theological issues also drive Bible translations. Some translations of the Bible, produced by single churches or groups of churches, may be seen as subject to a point of view by the translation committee. Among these the New World Translation, produced by Jehovah's Witnesses, is seen as controversial by some because of ...


12

Translations are only approximations of the original text. Each translation of the Bible will vary on two levels: (1) The scholar's study and understanding of specific phrases and what they mean, and (2) the purpose of the translation which can vary from a staunch adherence to the original phraseology to freely changing the text for the purpose of increasing ...


12

The name given to a version of the Bible is just that, a name. It's a bit like asking how long New York will stay New for - it's not going to be dropped because it's what the city is called, rather than a description of it. Some versions of the Bible are referred to by year, or sometimes by century, for example: 21st Century King James Version New ...


11

"How accurate is translation X compared to translation Y?" sounds like a simple question, but it really isn't at all. There really can't be a single definitive translation, for a variety of reasons. Some questions to ask about any particular translation are: What source texts were being used? Newer translations aren't automatically better than older ...


11

The Masoretic (Hebrew) text is closer to the Bible Jesus used, but Septuagint (LXX) was the one used by the New Testament writers. In most of the Old Testament, the differences are not very significant. However, in a few places the Masoretic and LXX have sharp differences. For example: Isaiah 7:14 NRSV from Masoretic Text: Therefore the Lord himself ...


11

Jehovah’s Witnesses use the standard 66-book Protestant Bible, but usually use their own translation thereof (they do reference other translations from time to time, but generally use The New World Translation). It’s fair to say that the NWT is quite, let’s say, distinctive in places, and has received a fair amount of criticism. The Witnesses do not in any ...


11

According to Wycliffe, this is the state of Bible Translation today: The worldwide status of Bible translation (2012): 6,800+ ...the number of languages spoken in the world today Under 2,000...the number of languages without any of the Bible, but with a possible need of a Bible translation to begin about 209 million...the number of people ...


10

The root senses of the words As you have noticed, English has changed a lot since the first translations were made. Now, the original meaning of 'blessed', according to the etymology, is 'consecrated', but it started to pick up a second meaning—over time it started to sound like more like the word 'bliss', and so, following on the idea of being ...


10

The Wiki page for the Bible translation project is here: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/WS:WPWB I wouldn't really trust it so much because it says stuff like this: If you know Greek or Hebrew, add your name to the list of participants and claim a chapter! Or if you don't want to make that commitment yet, check somebody else's work. If you don't know ...


10

It wouldn't have you believe in witchcraft it would just have you avoid it. Whether you believe in it or not is entirely separate from it existing, see this wiki about Ouija boards. So you don't have to believe that Ouija boards work, I personally don't. However, even though I don't believe they work, I still don't associate with those types of things. ...


9

Great question! Biblical translation is a difficult task because you're trying to get words and meaning out of 1900+ year old text and make it intelligible to people today in their own native language. Because of this, translation kind of becomes a spectrum. On one end, you have word-by-word translation while on the other end you have a paraphrase meant ...


9

The Society for Biblical Literature produces a well regarded translation (Logos even carries it). According to their own mission statement, they are concerned with biblical scholarship and not doctrine. Their vowed mission statement is simply "to promote biblical scholarship." They are a secular organization not affiliated with any religious organization ...


9

The New King James version is meant to be an update (circa 1975) of the vocabulary and grammar of the King James Version, while preserving the classic style and literary beauty of the original 1611 KJV version. 130 translators used the original King James version as well as Greek, Aramaic, and Hebrew texts including the Dead Sea Scrolls. The translators ...


8

Since one of the reasons for the English Reformation by King Henry VIII which lead to the creation of the Church of England was divorce, I doubt King James I would have needed a new translation. From Wikipedia, it sounds like the main reasons for the commissioning of the KJV 70 years after the reformation were around translation errors believed to be in the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible