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4

For Baptism to be valid requires three things: form, matter and intention. Form refers to the words, which must refer to baptism in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. LDS baptism meets this criteria. Matter requires the use of water. LDS baptism meets this criteria. The Intention must be to do what the Church does. For this reason baptism in ...


1

In your example, Susie's second baptism would, as others have already explained, be invalid. Since neither she nor the priest knew about her previous baptism, the invalid baptism would not constitute a sin. Nevertheless, there's a problem for Susie: An invalid baptism does not remit sins. Any mortal sins that she committed after her first (valid) baptism ...


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There is another aspect to this question which is important. It is that the Catholic Church accepts as valid any baptism done in the Trinitarian form with the proper intention. This means that if an adult from another Christian denomination who has already been baptized converts to the Catholic Church, in most cases, he or she does not need to be ...


1

The Church of England is a wide-ranging denomination, and different parts of it hold different view on the nature of baptism. Many members prefer to delay baptism of children until they are old enough to decide for themselves. Others will see baptism as purely symbolic. I would be confident in asserting that there is no universally held opinion about the ...



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