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17

It is not the trinitarian language, it is the language with which Christ commanded his disciples to go and baptize: Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: (Matt 28:19) Trinitarianism interprets this to mean one God with three personages. The fulness of the gospel ...


12

Why do Protestants teach the non-necessity of baptism for salvation? Those who see baptism as something additional to salvation might use the following verses; Luke 23:43 And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise. The thief on the cross was not baptized. 1 Corinthians 1:17 For Christ sent me not ...


10

Jesus' baptism was not a confession of guilt. He fulfilled the rite of baptism because He identified Himself as one of us, taking the steps we are to take. His life of perfect submission here on earth is an example to us. Matthew 3 (NKJV) 14 And John tried to prevent Him, saying, “I need to be baptized by You, and are You coming to me?” 15 ...


10

Let me state the views of those who believe baptism is not necessary for salvation. (It's not just Protestants by the way - Catholics teach that actual physical baptism is not absolutely necessary for salvation. There are several circumstances where substitutes for it are acceptable). "Born of water" might mean several things other than baptism. It might ...


9

The Roman Ritual prescribes 24. An infant of infidel parents may be baptized lawfully even though the parents are opposed, provided that its life is in such danger that one can reasonably foresee it may die before attaining the use of reason. Outside the case of danger of death, it may lawfully be baptized, provided its Catholic rearing is ...


9

Credo-baptists (note: not all Protestants) that hold the views you refer to, rely more on very clear soteriological proof texts that are not as open to alternative interpretations* as the verses you have cited such as: 8 For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— 9 not by works, so that ...


8

Baptists practice baptism because it is something taught in Scripture. Your question hits exactly on the distinction between those denominations that believe that baptism is necessary for salvation, and those that don't. Baptists don't see it as necessary for salvation. Instead, it's seen as an outward expression of obedience. The analogy is ...


8

Scripture doesn't say. However, what does it mean to "baptize in someone's name"? It means baptizing, having the authority of that person to do so. If we baptize in the name of Jesus, it is as though Jesus had baptized. John the baptist was son of a priest, so it is safe to assume that he had priestly authority from God to baptize. Thus he baptized in ...


7

Most Catholics are baptized as infants; consequently, there are two sets of requirements: one for the parents or guardians of infants who are to be baptized, and one for adults (those who have "reached the age of reason", which is not specified in the Code of Canon Law and may be perhaps left up to the local bishop). The general church-wide rules regarding ...


7

Here's the current practice in the USA: Baptism of children in the care of same-sex couples presents a serious pastoral concern. Nevertheless, the Church does not refuse the Sacrament of Baptism to these children, but there must be a well founded hope that the children will be brought up in the Catholic religion. In those cases where Baptism is ...


7

The argument from scripture centres firstly around the meaning of the original word which we translate as baptize in english: Strong's Concordance baptizó: to dip, sink Original Word: βαπτίζω Part of Speech: Verb Transliteration: baptizó Phonetic Spelling: (bap-tid'-zo) Short Definition: I dip, submerge, baptize ...


7

No. White is usually recommended, though. It is more practical, since the jumpsuits are also white.


6

I agree that Baptism is an outward expression of an inward change and isn't what saves you, yet even so, it is important to be baptised for three excellent reasons: It is a rite of initiation into the Christian community - Although our confession before God (of our faith in Christ and his Lordship over us) is of primary importance, Public confession of our ...


6

The breaking, blessing, and partaking of the bread and water constitutes the sacrament ordinance in the LDS Church. It's how one renews their baptismal covenants. If one has not made those covenants, it is of no matter. (Parents often encourage their children to take the sacrament to prepare them to one day renew their covenants and to teach them the value ...


6

I'll start with the "state of Christian grace" bit. The common teaching (and probably not limited to Catholics) is that people who die not in a state of grace do not go to heaven. BUT, the church also teaches that we don't know who is in a state of Christian grace, or not. One of the teachings of the Roman Catholic church is that once a person has been ...


6

While the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are three separate personages, the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost is the same. They are unified in purpose and will. So what's in a name? Reputation. By extension, a name represents an agent or authority. Their reputation, authority, and agency (free will) is unified and is thus the same, even though they are ...


5

The color white is primarily symbolic of the pure state of the baby's/adult's soul along with the renewal of life after being cleansed of original sin by the Holy Spirit. But as with all symbolism, there are many more things associated with the color (according to Wikipedia): According to surveys in Europe and the United States, white is the color most ...


5

Oneness believers believe that for water baptism to be valid, one must be baptized in the name of Jesus, rather than the mainstream baptismal formula in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. They believe this follows the example found in Acts 2:38; Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name ...


5

The enquiry is about the policy of Protestant denominations on the choice of baptismal names. I am an ordained minister (Presbyter) of the British Methodist Church with thirty years' experience. In the Methodist Church, this matter would be up to the judgment of the officiating minister's conscience, though parents could appeal to superior authorities in ...


5

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith published a very very brief document on the subject in 2001. The entire text of the English translation is: Question: Whether the baptism conferred by the community «The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints», called «Mormons» in the vernacular, is valid. Response: Negative. The Supreme ...


5

This is not clear purely from Church law, but it appears unlikely. Canon 752, section 1 of the 1917 Code of Canon Law reads: Adultus, nisi sciens et volens probeque instructus, ne baptizetur; insuper admonendus ut de peccatis suis doleat. That is: An adult is not to be baptized, unless knowing and willing, and having been properly instructed; ...


5

Renunciation of the Devil in the Baptismal Rite is believed to be of Apostolic origin. The first explicit record of the use of this formula comes from Tertullian, where he says: "When we are going to enter the water, but a little before, in the presence of the congregation and under the hand of the president, we solemnly profess that we disown the devil, ...


5

There is no "official" statement that I know of regarding this. The Church does not consider those who are menstruating to be unclean. There is no rule against being baptized during that time. Temples provide tampons for the women who are. As long as they are using one, there isn't a problem. I read what you were referring to from the link you posted. ...


4

Baptism leaves an indelible mark on the soul, but heresy separates one from the Church. Canon 2314, 1917 Code of Canon Law: “All apostates from the Christian faith and each and every heretic or schismatic: 1) Incur ipso facto excommunication Pope Leo XIII, Satis Cognitum (# 9), June 29, 1896:  “… can it be lawful for anyone to reject any one ...


4

There was no dove at the baptism of Jesus. Read the scripture a bit more closely and you see that: Then John testified, “I saw the Spirit descending like a dove from heaven, and it remained on him." John 1:32 NET. It was the Holy Spirit which came down like a dove.


4

"Should they get re-baptized"s off-topic - it's opinion-based. However, here's a sample of what some teach and practice. In various Churches that I've attended, including Baptist, Evangelical Free, and local community non-denominational Bible Churches, getting baptized again is fairly common. This is based on the belief that Baptism doesn't save us, but ...


4

My understanding of the what you call the Greater Baptism is baptism via the Holy Spirit when you accept Christ as your savior. Water baptism and Spiritual baptism are two separate events. NASB: Matt 3:11 “As for me, I baptize you [g]with water for repentance, but He who is coming after me is mightier than I, and I am not fit to remove His sandals; He ...


4

In whose name was Jesus baptized? The baptism of John was for repentance. This was not as much an immersion in the name of a person but a public declaration of sorrow for sin and the change of thinking associated with repentance. Matthew 3:7 But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of ...


4

What was John's baptism? An academic paper from Colin Brown offers an answer by surveying the historical context of John's baptism, and the (scant) details we're provided about John himself. I'll attempt to summarize his key points: The traditional picture of John standing in a waist-deep river, trickling water over people's heads is 'a scene of pious ...


3

Matt has described the current policy of the LDS church accurately - namely, that nobody in attendance should be discouraged from taking of the sacrament. For informational purposes, however, it is useful to know that his policy was enacted following years of fairly inconsistent practices from congregation to congregation. As the LDS Church has grown ...



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