Hot answers tagged

14

From the PoV of the Roman Catholic church, baptism is a sacrament for the living. (For that matter, so are all 7 Sacraments). Once the body dies one is subject to judgment, which in the case of individuals is particular judgment. Put simply, we have our whole life to come to Jesus, to open ourselves to salvation, and to accept God's sanctifying Grace. To ...


11

Canon law states: Canon 868 §1 For an infant to be baptised lawfully it is required: 1° that the parents, or at least one of them, or the person who lawfully holds their place, give their consent; 2° that there be a well-founded hope that the child will be brought up in the catholic religion. If such hope is truly lacking, the baptism is, ...


9

In short, the answer is “no.” Even for the Catholic Church, according to which Baptism is an instrument through which saving (sanctifying) grace is infused into a person’s soul, a forced baptism or baptism imposed by trickery would not be valid. St. Thomas Aquinas, in his treatise on Baptism (part of the Summa theologiae) explains as follows: I answer ...


8

Nothing. The Code of Canon Law states: Every person not yet baptized and only such a person is able to be baptized. (Canon 864; emphasis added) Here's what the Catechism of the Catholic Church has to say about baptism and why it can only be received once: Incorporated into Christ by Baptism, the person baptized is configured to Christ. Baptism ...


8

It is in D&C 68:25–27, a revelation Joseph Smith received in November 1831, that this doctrine is outlined with the age of eight years old specified: 25 And again, inasmuch as parents have children in Zion, or in any of her stakes which are organized, that teach them not to understand the doctrine of repentance, faith in Christ the Son of the living ...


8

No. White is usually recommended, though. It is more practical, since the jumpsuits are also white.


7

A great deal of early Church art showed baptism being done in the nude. This would not have been shocking in the world of the early Church, as many early Christians were slaves. Most slaves in the Roman world owned no more than one garment, and many were given no clothing at all, particularly those who mainly performed hard physical labor. Below are some ...


7

No, it could not be considered valid in that form. (Per the current teaching of the church). Valid baptism (per the Catholic Church) requires use of water and the Trinitarian form. From the Catechism: 1239 The essential rite of the sacrament follows: Baptism properly speaking. It signifies and actually brings about death to sin and entry into the ...


7

In order for a child to be baptized, there must be "a founded hope that the infant will be brought up in the Catholic religion" (Code of Canon Law, Canon 868 section 1). That is, the priest must judge it reasonable to believe that you will raise your child Catholic. This is reasonable from the church's point of view since it baptizes infants so that, growing ...


6

Two early church writings can be seen to address this issue: the Didache and Justin Martyr's First Apology. Didache Early evidence for a trinitarian formula in baptism might be found in the Didache, which is commonly dated to the late first century: And concerning baptism, baptize this way: Having first said all these things, baptize into the name of ...


5

In the Catholic Church, there are indeed a very few cases in which priests are required to delay, not withhold, the Sacrament of Baptism; illegitimacy is not one of them. Catholicism considers baptism necessary for salvation: The Lord himself affirms that Baptism is necessary for salvation. [citing John 3:5] He also commands his disciples to proclaim ...


5

"That depends." Most FVers define salvation as "the state of being joined to Christ through membership in the Church." If baptism is the event that initiates this, then baptism is the means of salvation defined in this way. From the Federal Vision Joint Statement: We affirm that membership in the one true Christian Church is visible and objective, and ...


5

For Baptism to be valid requires three things: form, matter and intention. Form refers to the words, which must refer to baptism in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. LDS baptism meets this criteria. Matter requires the use of water. LDS baptism meets this criteria. The Intention must be to do what the Church does. For this reason baptism in ...


4

It is fair to say that the Catholic Church considers baptism to be a rebirth in Christ. Baptism, at whatever age the sacrament is received, is considered a permanent blessing. This answer covers some of that. CCC 1257(excerpt) The Church does not know of any means other than Baptism that assures entry into eternal beatitude; this is why she takes care ...


4

Well, I am not catholic, but there seem to be a question that fascinated and perplexed many of the early Church fathers. Justin Martyr addressed the baptism of Jesus, as a sign that He is manifested as the Christ, a sign for the Church first, and then the world. Now, we know that he did not go to the river because He stood in need of baptism, or of ...


4

The Credo-baptists that affirm the Nicene creed, would argue that "baptism for the remission of sins" need not be interpreted as "baptism accomplishes the remission of sins", but more along the lines of "baptism witnesses the remission of sins" eg: ... The phrase, “We confess one baptism for the remission of sins,” does not mean that baptism leads to ...


4

Charles Elliott (Delineation of Roman Catholicism, pages 208; 1841) cites the Catechism of the Council of Trent, which says that an adult must desire and propose to receive baptism, however he says that compulsory baptism may also be practised. He cites Pope Innocent III, who said that any voluntary consent is sufficient, although mixed with an involuntary ...


4

Thomas Aquinas hypothesised that a merciful God would not consign innocent babies who died without being purged of Original Sin through baptism, to hell. Aquinas said these innocents must dwell in limbo, a place between heaven and hell, alongside virtuous but unbaptised pagans such as Plato and Moses, born before Jesus had come to explain things. Thus limbo ...


4

Did you explain this to the priest? Are you a regular parishioner at the church you intend to baptize your son? Is there a witness/sponsor of your baptism the priest could contact? Essentially, you must somehow prove to the priest who will baptize your son that this is true: Can. 868 §1 2/ there must be a founded hope that the infant will be brought up ...


3

+1 for a great question! I have not found any solid answer or doctrine of the church that refers to this. Perhaps in the Joseph Smith Papers you could find answers there www.josephsmithpapers.org, but I haven't searched there. What you say is true is for today. One has to be baptized before they receive the priesthood, but if you look in the Book of ...


3

Anonymous answered your question because these quotes are from early church fathers, describing their thoughts as to whether or not the apostles were baptized. I would like to add a few points, mainly to clarify the difference between Tertullian and Aquinas, but also to question the (common) premise that the New Testament doesn't record the baptism of the ...


3

Tertullian comments on this issue, at some length. I confess, I don't quite understand what he is saying---if indeed he is saying anything or just blathering on aimlessly---but I will quote him entirely (source): When, however, the prescript is laid down that “without baptism, salvation is attainable by none” (chiefly on the ground of that declaration ...


2

John's was a baptism of repentance. It was a cleaning of the body, according to the Law that commanded those who were unclean to "wash with water". This is not the same baptism as that in Christ since the Apostles baptized in the name of Christ those who had already received John's baptism in Acts 19.


2

In a limited sense, yes, some Reformed paedobaptists have supported this: the presentation of slave children for baptism by their masters was practiced and supported in the Presbyterian Church in the USA in the antebellum period. However, I find no evidence that adult slaves were baptized except upon their own conversion (that is, not when the master was ...


2

It can be helpful to consider a marriage at the moment of the exchange of consent—i.e., when it comes into existence—and distinguish that from the marriage as it endures through time. The divisions that you refer to all have to do with whether the necessary conditions are in place in order for the marriage to come into existence in the first place; that is, ...


2

I don't think any denominational body has ruled on this; until one does so, it remains a matter of conscience for individual believers. Part of the difficulty is that foster care as a named/organized phenomenon only goes back to the 19th century. That said, there seem to be two main schools of thought: yes and no. End of answer. I'm kidding... but those ...


2

There are two main arguments against it. First, the ICOC leadership explained to me that Matt. 28:19–20 establishes that one must be a “disciple” before one is baptized on the following basis. Matt: 28:19 in the NIV reads, “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father . . .” Note the italicized “them.” It is said ...


2

The 2nd Council of Orange was assembled, as the document itself states, to address the controversy between Augustine and Pelagius. In short, the Council was about whether original sin existed in new born or if they were born free from the stain of original sin. If you read the first Canon you can get a better context of what the Council means by Free will. ...


2

16 John answered, saying unto them all, I indeed baptize you with water; but there cometh he that is mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to unloose: he shall baptize you in the Holy Spirit and in fire: 17 whose fan is in his hand, thoroughly to cleanse his threshing-floor, and to gather the wheat into his garner; but the chaff ...


2

Possibly. According to most Christians, including the Roman Catholic Church, the Church of England and the Eastern Orthodox Churches, it would not be valid because there is no mention of the baptism being in the name of the God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Ghost. Therefore the Baptism was not administered in the right form. Apart from form ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible