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10

The Catholic Church has always taught that the three valid forms of Baptism are immersion, pouring, and sprinkling. Evidence that the Church has validated the form of pouring instead of immersion is demonstrated by the Didache which was written around A.D. 70: "Concerning baptism, baptize in this manner: Having said all these things beforehand, ...


8

Charles Alsobrook has quoted authoritative sources in his answer, but there is another side to the question (or the answer). The Didache indicates that the minister should use as much water as possible1 — a river is mentioned first. And in every case the water must be moving, either of its own accord or having been enlivened by pouring. It's not a ...


7

No, in Protestant understanding infant baptism does not in itself affect an infants' soul. The same goes for adult baptism actually. The rite of baptism itself is not seen as having any direct effect on the eternal status of the soul. It's primarily a visible acknowledgement that God has made a promise and a reminder of how Christs atonement works. In the ...


7

Baptismal certificates are still used by Churches for whom Trinitarian baptism is important. This is so that they can be certain that someone has been validly baptised. The Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox Churches recognise each other’s baptisms and those of many other denominations as a valid, once-for-all and transferable sacrament. But it can only be ...


7

To understand the doctrine of baptism for the dead, it's necessary to first understand the doctrine of baptism, and the crucial role it plays in LDS theology. Baptism is held to be essential for the salvation of everyone with the maturity to be capable of committing sin. The fourth Article of Faith states: 4 We believe that the first principles and ...


6

Many years ago, before governments were in the habit of providing live birth documentation and proof of identity, a baptismal certificate was valid proof of citizenship. Because people didn't move around, churches took upon themselves the responsibility to know the souls in their area, and kept register of the same. For the previous generation, where not ...


5

I'll address the two main questions from a Roman Catholic perspective: Question 1: Does baptizing the baby have anything to do with the destination of the infant’s soul? Short answer: Yes. Long answer: Baptism is normally a prerequisite for entering heaven, BUT There are other forms of baptism besides water baptism, AND At least one of those (the ...


5

Μετανοεῖτε καὶ πιστεύετε ἐν τῷ εὐαγγελίῳ. Repent and believe in the Gospel. Mark 1:15. Of course, this cannot be accomplished unless the Father draws a man to His Son, as it is written (John 6:44), No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him, and I will raise him on the last day.


5

For many Baptists, the answer is fairly simple and is well conveyed by the saying "Baptism is merely an outward manifestation of an inward decision." For those on that end of the baptismal spectrum (where it is a sign rather than a sacrement), the question is thus fairly moot. The difficulty in assessing the "validity" of a baptism comes from those who ...


5

This is the official Catholic position: On April 22, 2007, the advisory body known as the International Theological Commission released a document, originally commissioned by Pope John Paul II, entitled "The Hope of Salvation for Infants Who Die without Being Baptized."[8] After tracing the history of the various opinions that have been and are held on the ...


5

There are a number of different cases with regard to accepting baptisms carried out in other denominations. Catholics Contrary to some perceptions, Catholics actually accept most baptisms carried out by other denominations. "if the proper matter and form be used and the one conferring the sacrament really "intends to perform what the Church performs" the ...


5

My take on Catholic teaching is that it is conflicted on the issue, on the one hand wanting to take the stance that baptism is absolutely necessary for salvation, but also recognizing that there are real problems with that position. The end result seems to be that it's necessary except where it's either practically impossible, or is prevented by ...


4

This is an old question, but I'll answer anyway. The Orthodox Christian Church baptizes in the nude because most baptisms are performed on very young (less than 1 year old) babies. The children are nude and fully immersed. The service is pretty much exactly as you'd see in Hippolytus. Adults who are baptized are permitted to wear a robe or bathing suit for ...


4

They're not kept full all year long, there is a blessing concerning Holy Water that takes place solely during the Triduum. But that is not the water kept in the font. There is a fairly erroneous Catholic tradition that some priests take part in where they dump all the Holy Water before Lent starts then fill them back up when Easter comes around. What we ...


4

From my service/experience in the Archdiocese of Atlanta I have observed that, like the CCC states, triple immersion is preferred, but the pouring of water 3 times is much more common. The variables that determine how each parish baptizes its members are numerous and overlapping, but usually can be lumped into several main categorical reasons. Location ...


4

While I admittedly don't have a book citation for this, my experience (I've also worked as a cantor and have volunteered in different roles in a few different parishes and I've had three kids baptized) is that pouring is the norm. In addition to my experience of the actual rite, I will also point out that most baptismal fonts are simply too small for ...


4

This answer is not meant to replace the other well stated answers, but is meant to supplement/support them by addressing the following question: Which denomination(s) believes that infant baptism is a mean of securing the afterlife of the baby? Catholics, Eastern and Oriental Orthodox, Anglicans, Lutherans, Presbyterians, Methodists, some Nazarenes, ...


4

You asked about "every particular Catholic dogma." I think there are many good Catholics who, not being theologians, don't even know what all the particular dogmas of the Catholic Church are, and who therefore don't explicitly believe them. But they implicitly believe them, in the sense that (1) they believe that the Catholic Church has received from Christ ...


3

When you obstinately reject a Catholic dogma you become a heretic. There are many heretics that call themselves Catholic, but they will have no share in Eternal Life according to the infallible decree of Pope Eugene IV at the Council of Florence. Pope Eugene IV, Council of Florence, “Cantate Domino,” 1441, ex cathedra:” The Holy Roman Church firmly ...


3

As user Ignatius Theophorus stated, Catholics do accept baptisms performed in other denominations as valid. The catch is that the baptism must also be performed properly to be valid. Baptism not done "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit" would not be considered a true (valid) baptism. The problem is not that it was performed ...


3

There was a time when the disciples followed the Lord Jesus without the benefit of the Holy Spirit. They followed out of faith alone believing in His promises. It is the most basic form of faith. John 7:37-39 Now on the last day, the great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried out, saying, "If anyone is thirsty, let him come to Me and drink. (38) ...


3

There seems to be a basis for sprinkling. Ezekiel 36:25-27. " I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will become clean; I will cleanse you from all your uncleanness and from all your disgusting idols. 26 I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit inside you. I will remove the heart of stone from your body and give you a heart of flesh. 27 I will ...


3

The answer to this would really depend on what tradition you come from. Some traditions teach that it is baptism in water that brings salvation. Thus, it could be argued that baptism, bringing salvation to an individual, would be the inception of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. This, then, would, in fact, be a sort of protection. However, for ...


3

In the Church of England you need to be able to answer the questions asked of godparents truthfully and sincerely: Parents and godparents, the Church receives these children with joy. Today we are trusting God for their growth in faith. Will you pray for them, draw them by your example into the community of faith and walk with them in the way of ...


3

Great question, Narnian; great answer, Mason. Very complete. I think, Narnian, you had a great question at the end that I'd like to respond to: If someone is left out by an oversight or who had no children, does that person simply get deprived of something because they were overlooked? Short answer: no. We know God is not capricious, and he is no ...


2

Here's an answer from a Christian pacifist perspective. Christian pacifists would point out that the Bible verses you quote focus on what is not said rather than on what is said, i.e. an argument of silence. We highlight what Jesus and the apostles did say about violence: turn the other cheek (Mt 5:39), love your enemies (Mt 5:44), we do not wage war like ...


2

This is a topic that is close to the heart of many, and as such, I hope not to offend anyone. I lost a child at 20 weeks, he was a misscarriage, and my wife was able to deliver him naturally. (I am not looking for sympathy). The doctrine of the LDS Church, of which I am part, had great healing and comfort for me. This come from The Book of Mormon, Moroni ...


2

I think your question is probably about infant baptism, not child baptism. The latter isn't really a term used by churches. Those that would baptism young children but not infants would generally call this "believers baptism". If the child is too young to make even a simplistic declaration of faith then they probably fall under the umbrella of "infant" ...


2

Why is the New Testament silent on Infant Baptism? Baptist/evangelical response: The reason there is no mention of infant baptism in the New Testament is because this practice is a Catholic invention that developed two to three centuries after the Apostles. The Bible states that sinners must believe and repent before being baptized. Infants do not have ...


2

Although I cannot give you a definitive answer to your question, I will tell you what I have come to believe from my study of the Bible. It may have been God himself who decided to use the image of a dove in this case. At that time the heart of worship was the Pentateuch, or the first five books of the Bible written by Moses. these were supported by the ...



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