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From the PoV of the Roman Catholic church, baptism is a sacrament for the living. (For that matter, so are all 7 Sacraments). Once the body dies one is subject to judgment, which in the case of individuals is particular judgment. Put simply, we have our whole life to come to Jesus, to open ourselves to salvation, and to accept God's sanctifying Grace. To ...


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Anonymous answered your question because these quotes are from early church fathers, describing their thoughts as to whether or not the apostles were baptized. I would like to add a few points, mainly to clarify the difference between Tertullian and Aquinas, but also to question the (common) premise that the New Testament doesn't record the baptism of the ...


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I would like to add to KorvinStarmast's excellent answer that all of the sacraments have three essential components common to all seven of them: A sign: some kind of physical sign that is performed. (This sign can then be resolved in most of the sacraments into the “matter”—generally either whatever is transformed by the sacrament, or the physical gesture ...


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My answer is similar to KorvinStarmast's, but I use a more authoritative source: One is judged immediately after death, as Benedict XII defined in his constitution Benedictus Deus: By this Constitution which is to remain in force for ever, we, with apostolic authority, define the following: According to the general disposition of God, the souls of all ...



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