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17

I would say that baptism is still highly "necessary", since Jesus Himself, in his final directions to His disciples, told them to: Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit (emphasis added) and the parallel: Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all ...


16

I second the answer of @mason-wheeler that Acts 2:37-38 represents the basic Christian assumption that repentance and baptism, and indeed the entire Christian life that is "the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, and breaking of bread, and prayers," is critical to salvation, and pursuit of salvation outside this life is perilous. Furthermore, resisting a ...


12

Ritual cleansing was a common part of some Jewish sects around the turn of the era. One of the best examples of this (that I know of) comes from Khirbet Qumran (where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found)—where there were found several miqvot (sn. miqveh) used for a sort of "baptism." It is commonly held that the people living at Qumran were Essenes, and some ...


12

There are two main arguments against it. One is that it is fairly arbitrary to decide how far advanced in discipleship someone needs to be in order to be baptized. Whatever level you set, there will be some who never attain that level of discipleship - however normal Christian doctrine would say that those people are nonetheless true Christians and members ...


11

I'm Catholic, but I think this is sort of normal Christian advice, let me know if it doesn't make sense (logically at least) If you believe that baptism leaves an indelible mark on your soul that cannot be removed, then you wouldn't want to get baptized again. It would be a sign of a lack of faith in God. But, if for whatever reason you had reason to ...


11

The practice is based on revelations given to the prophet Joseph Smith on the subject, explaining how it should be carried out. The practice of baptism for the dead is not based directly on 1 Corinthians 15:29, since the biblical verse only alludes to the practice but explains nothing about the details of how it should be performed, but Latter-Day Saints ...


11

The Good News is that the promised Messiah - God's annointed - has returned. The Kingdom of God was to be established. When Jesus begins to preach in Luke 4, he overtly references himself as the promised Messiah of Isaiah. 16 He went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom. He stood ...


11

Acts 2:39 For the promise is to you, and your children, and to all who are afar off... A lot of our argument comes from the inference that Baptism is to Circumcision as the Lord's Supper is to Passover. Colossians 2:11-12 In [Christ] also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, by putting off the body of the flesh*, by the ...


11

There is no precedent for infant baptism in Scripture Infant baptism simply is not found in the Bible. That isn't an argument that it can't be done, but it should be seen as an extrabiblical tradition. Baptism is commanded with salvation Jesus commanded the apostles as follows: Matthew 28:19 (NIV) 19  Therefore go and make disciples of all ...


10

I cannot provide a better answer then the answer provided by the LCMS (The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod). This is taken from the LCMS FAQ: http://www.lcms.org/Document.fdoc?src=lcm&id=537 On the role of infant baptism: Q: How does faith play a role in infant Baptism? Is faith later taken care of when the child is confirmed? A: Lutherans ...


10

There is a vast difference between an infant baptism and the baptism of a child. An infant is baptized as the result of someone else's belief, not their own. At age 5 1/2, I had a true understanding that Christ was the Son of God, lived, died and arose for me, and was asking for my repentance and a home in my life, my heart. That is when I accepted Him as ...


10

At least the Roman Catholic and Presbyterian churches do. A fairly comprehensive list is available on the wikipedia article. As to the why, at least from the Presbyterian perspective, children of saints are viewed as being born into a covenantal relationship in similar vein to the males of ancient Israel being required to be circumcised. Fuller ...


10

Speaking as an adherent of the belief that salvation is by faith alone, and not of works (lest any man should boast - Ephesians 2:8-10): Baptism is an external symbol of obedience. It doesn't gain you anything. It is an outward show and demonstration that symbolizes our death to our old selves, and resurrection into the new life as a Christian. ...


10

The most usual passage cited is: 1 Samuel 1:11 (HCSB) 11 Making a vow, she pleaded, “LORD of Hosts, if You will take notice of Your servant’s affliction, remember and not forget me, and give Your servant a son, I will give him to the LORD all the days of his life, and his hair will never be cut.” 1 Samuel 1:23-28 (HCSB) 23 Her husband Elkanah ...


10

In an emergency where there is danger of imminent death, anyone (yes, anyone) who has the appropriate intention can baptize, by using the Trinitarian baptismal formula. In all other cases, Catholics are instructed to contact their parish. (Note that this only concerns who can baptize: not all persons should be baptized. There are certain restrictions ...


10

The Catholic Church has always taught that the three valid forms of Baptism are immersion, pouring, and sprinkling. Evidence that the Church has validated the form of pouring instead of immersion is demonstrated by the Didache which was written around A.D. 70: "Concerning baptism, baptize in this manner: Having said all these things beforehand, ...


9

Baptism of the Holy Spirit refers to receiving the Holy Spirit into your life. In John 14:16-17 (NIV), Jesus says: 16 And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another advocate to help you and be with you forever— 17 the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept him, because it neither sees him nor knows him. But you know him, for he lives ...


9

What you are describing is Anabaptism, or Re-baptism, and has been a well accepted practice, and even the basis of an entire movement shortly after the Protestant reformation. Today, Mennonites, Amish, Hutterites, and a few other smaller groups, that grew out of this original Anabaptist movement, still exist. Historically, these groups held to the belief ...


9

The Wikipedia article on the subject is very thorough. Most Christians practise infant baptism. Denominations that practise infant baptism include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, Armenian Apostolic Church, Assyrian Church of the East, the Anglican churches, Lutherans, Presbyterians, Methodists, some Church of ...


8

This would seem to be somewhat common among any church that believes in Believer's baptism. Since baptism under that view is a profession of faith in Christ, it would seem that any previous baptism based upon the same faith would be valid. However, if there is a large doctrinal difference between the former and current fellowship (and thus the believer ...


8

The Bible doesn't talk about denominations, nor did Jesus or any of the disciples start any denominations. Denominations came from the disagreement of men on the interpretation of the Word of God. For this reason, I do not believe this passage can refer to denominations, which didn't exist when Paul wrote it. Paul insisted in various places on the unity of ...


8

From this article, The reason they were baptizing "in the name of Jesus" is not because it was a formula, but because the phrase, "in the name of" means "in the authority of. They were baptizing with his authority. They were using his authority to baptize believers into a new life. Another quote from that same site: Therefore, when someone is ...


8

It seems that regulations and opinions on this are varied. It depends (very strongly) on the denomination and what they believe. Key Verse: I'll put this here for later reference: 1 Corinthians 11:27-28 (NIV) 27 So then, whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of sinning against the body and blood ...


8

This is a difficult question - not the question are we saved by grace, because we are - but the question of why does Jesus say "water and spirit". I am not sure an answer can have any finality to it, because of the nature of deep study that is required, and many top theologians disagree on the meaning of it. So, what does Jesus mean when he says "born of ...


8

One of the best articles on this controversial subject is from the Christian Apologetics and Research Ministry, entitled Is Baptism Necessary for Salvation? by Matt Slick. I've included some of the key verses it refers to, and arguments it uses, below. Romans 5:1 and Ephesians 2:8 show that we are justified by faith (not by faith + something else). ...


8

I think part of the problem with baptism discussions is that they are often mis-characterized as "adult" baptisms and "infant" baptisms, when really, the crux of disagreement is in the significance of the baptism rather than the age of its recipient. (baptism based on repentance vs. baptism as a covenental birthright) I know you clarify this in your ...


8

This answer is based on the article Christians and the Roman Army AD173-337 by John Helgeland (Church History 43(2):149-163, 200; 1974). The start date of AD173 is the year when we have the first evidence (after the NT) of Christians in the military - in Legio XII Fulminata (the Lightning Legion) under Marcus Aurelius. Prohibitions on members of the (Roman) ...


8

Explain your situation to your priest, they may be able to get your baptismal record from your original home parish or just excercise his prudential judgement and allow you to receive communion. This is pastoral advice, which isn't the norm for this site, but it may be good to confess attending worship services with other Christians, you'll usually see ...


8

Charles Alsobrook has quoted authoritative sources in his answer, but there is another side to the question (or the answer). The Didache indicates that the minister should use as much water as possible1 — a river is mentioned first. And in every case the water must be moving, either of its own accord or having been enlivened by pouring. It's not a ...


7

On the contrary. Salvation is a prerequisite for baptism. Have a look at Acts 10:44-48 NASB (emphasis added): While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit fell upon all those who were listening to the message. All the circumcised believers who came with Peter were amazed, because the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the ...



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