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You will find rejection of the Penal Substitution Atonement theory among the Progressive churches and theologians. They reject the theory because it makes God out to be no different than the pagan gods. JKlemm responding to this question says "If a denomination/church/believer believes in the supremacy of Scripture, it's nearly impossible to reject Christ's ...


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The 'penal' in penal substitution is based on the idea that sin brings about punishment under the curse of the law. The curse of Adam's sin is death, which is a punishment. Punishment = the curse under the law for sin. Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us, for it is written: “Cursed is everyone who is hung on a pole.” ...


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At the risk of being obvious (too obvious, perhaps, such that I'll get a bunch of downvotes!), the penalty aspect of Christ's death was just that: DEATH! "The soul that sinneth shall die," the Scriptures say (Ezekiel 18:4)). "In the day that you eat thereof, you will die" (Genesis 2:17). (We know, of course, there are two kinds of death: spiritual and ...


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Romans 5 is a great chapter for this topic. You see, at just the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly. 7 Very rarely will anyone die for a righteous person, though for a good person someone might possibly dare to die. 8 But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us. ...


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I do not believe there are any (in my experience or knowledge, anyway) Protestant churches that reject penal substitution. Protestant churches, for the most part with the exception of the newer liberal denominations, adhere to the traditional Reformation fundamentals of Sola Scriptura, Sola Christus, etc. If a denomination/church/believer believes in the ...


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Theory suggests that Calvin's strong support for and writings about penal substitution was tied to his work in the legal system (as a lawyer). The concept is definitely a parallel. [Christ] made a substitute and a surety in the place of transgressors and even submitted as a criminal, to sustain and suffer all the punishment which would have been ...


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The strongest defenders of penal substitution are going to be conservative Calvinists: that is, those who hold to the "five points" of Calvinism and reject modernist approaches to Scripture. Outside this group, many nonetheless hold to penal substitution, but there is more diversity of opinion. A few examples of conservative Calvinists who hold to penal ...


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This question is a bit old, but there is an omission in the only answer. fi11222's answer states that both ransom and penal substitution theories of atonement view God as needing payment of some form. I agree with the description of penal substitution, but I believe the orthodox ransom theory generally teaches that the ransom was paid to death and not God ...



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