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Anselm's satisfaction theory of the atonement is developed in his book, Cur Deus Homo, and, as presented, is not "based on the Bible" like we might expect. Instead, Anselm relies heavily on logic, and largely avoids citing Scripture to make his case. However, he is forced to rely on it in a few places, and he also tangentially mentions it in others. For ...


0

Why was Jesus, who is God, baptized by John the Baptist? When Jesus was baptised by means of "the laying on of hands" (Leviticus 16:21), it was "one Man's" righteous act (Romans 5:18), which took away all the sins of humankind. When Jesus was baptized, He said to John, "Permit it to be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all ...


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This answer is given from the perspective of the "Swedenborgian" or "New Church" denominations that accept the Christian theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772). Swedenborg rejected penal substitution as completely false and contrary to the plain teachings of the Bible. The primary question is: How do opponents of Penal Substitution explain God's ...


4

The following answer shall be largely influenced by my Roman Catholic faith, so be aware of such a fact while reading. With that said, here we gooooooooo!!! Penal Substitution And Its Failures The problem with the penal substitution theory is that it confuses many points that need distinction in order to understand the nature of Christ's sacrifice. For ...


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We needed a perfect sacrifice to trade our sin for forgiveness. But, as sin was all we knew, we needed a perfect sacrifice, and the only perfect thing was God.


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The hypothetical volunteer you posit has it wrong: “I will be the sacrifice and take on all the sins of the world past, present, and future and suffer and die as a substitutionary atonement for all of mankind” Jesus is never said to be an atonement. Jesus is never said to be a substitutionary atonement. Jesus is never said to take on all the sins of the ...


1

Fallen human beings are all disqualified because we all inherit the sinful nature. If Jesus had even one sin, He could never die for others' sins because He would have to die for His own. Therefore Christ knew no sin (2 Cor. 5:21; Heb. 4:15). He was made only in the likeness of the flesh of sin (Rom. 8:3). He was without spot or blemish (1 Pet. 1:19). ...


0

The factor which makes a sacrifice acceptable to God has to do with obedience to the original command of God not to eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. When Adam and Eve ate from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, their souls were contaminated in two ways, which made them no longer acceptable to God. They disobeyed God. ...


2

I'd just add that anyone other than a perfect sacrifice (Jesus) would also be tainted with sin and would require a savior themselves. How could any sinful person provide salvation for others when they themselves need saved from their own sinful condition?


4

According to the levitical priesthood a sacrifice had to be without defect Lev 22:20 Do not bring anything with a defect, because it will not be accepted on your behalf. In this case any sacrifice offered to God has to be without defect. We humans are born into sin and no one lives a life without sin. Romans 3:23 tells us we have all sinned and ...


3

This is certainly a challenging question. I'll rely on the writings of two prominent reformed theologians, Louis Berkhof and Charles Hodge, who are strong supporters of this doctrine. It's important to note, for reasons that will become clear, that they defend their position in the face of arguments made by opponents who believe in a just God. Those who ...



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