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The factor which makes a sacrifice acceptable to God has to do with obedience to the original command of God not to eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. When Adam and Eve ate from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, their souls were contaminated in two ways, which made them no longer acceptable to God. They disobeyed God. ...


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I'd just add that anyone other than a perfect sacrifice (Jesus) would also be tainted with sin and would require a savior themselves. How could any sinful person provide salvation for others when they themselves need saved from their own sinful condition?


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According to the levitical priesthood a sacrifice had to be without defect Lev 22:20 Do not bring anything with a defect, because it will not be accepted on your behalf. In this case any sacrifice offered to God has to be without defect. We humans are born into sin and no one lives a life without sin. Romans 3:23 tells us we have all sinned and ...


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This is certainly a challenging question. I'll rely on the writings of two prominent reformed theologians, Louis Berkhof and Charles Hodge, who are strong supporters of this doctrine. It's important to note, for reasons that will become clear, that they defend their position in the face of arguments made by opponents who believe in a just God. Those who ...


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What is the Biblical argument against Limited Atonement? Proponents claim that because not everyone is saved, God could not have intended that Christ die for everyone. There is an assumption in this logic regarding God's intentions. We get an insight into God's intentions from the these verses; 1 John 2:2 And he is the propitiation for our sins: and ...


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Just jəst/ 1. based on or behaving according to what is morally right and fair Was it fair for Jesus to take on what we deserve so that we can be treated as He deserves? No. However, is a voluntary act of self-renouncing love righteous? Certainly. Before even the foundation of the world, the plan of salvation was already agreed upon by the Father, Son ...


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Quite simply... The death of Christ for sin was His body of flesh only. He can not die spiritually because God is Eternal... from everlasting to everlasting, Ps.90:2. In the Old Testament we read all about blood sacrifices of animals performed by the priests which were given to typify the atoning death of Christ yet to play out in history. The requirement ...


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When the sinner is condemned and dies because "the wages of sin is death", the punishment is eternal because he is not able to provide a righteous life. The difference is, though Jesus took on our sins to become "sin for us" and was condemned to death, God raised Him up again because He never sinned Himself. Having never sinned, He - the second member of ...


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Christ “died” for our sins (1 Cor. 15:3). The punishment the law required for our sins was not the whippings on His back or Hell, but death. Jesus’ substitutionary death perfectly fulfilled the offering requirements of the OT. When the Jews of ancient Israel brought their offerings to God for their sins, the priest did not have the sinners wait for eternity ...


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Reformed theologians who hold to penal substitutionary atonement emphasize a) the divine nature of Christ and the increased capacity for suffering that that implies and b) the intensity of God's wrath against him. Louis Berkhof, in his Systematic Theology (3.2.1.B), writes: [Christ's] capacity for suffering was commensurate with the ideal character of ...


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How is it just that Jesus, an innocent, would be punished for our sins? Using only the yardstick of justice, it can seem puzzling that Jesus would willingly lay down his life. John 10:15 As the Father knoweth me, even so know I the Father: and I lay down my life for the sheep. Matthew 26:53 Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, ...


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This question is getting at the heart of what Christ's sacrifice truly means, and so answering it is a very specific and important endeavor. The philosophical understanding here is as follows; there is a distinction between Christ's 'primary' and 'secondary' cause that is important to note, because if God as Christ truly took upon Himself the fullness of ...



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