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47

Christian apologetics often employ a form of presuppositional logic. In fact, the wikipedia page for Presupposition (philosophy) specifically addresses this issue: A variety of Christian apologetics, called presuppositional apologetics, argues that the existence or non-existence of God is the basic presupposition of all human thought, and that all men ...


32

This question is actually pretty cut and dry. At the core the main thing you ask is "Can I go to heaven even rejecting Christian belief by substituting some set of actions?" No. No amount of works of any kind will get you into heaven. There is no substitute for faith. Hebrews 11:6 (ESV) And without faith it is impossible to please him, for whoever ...


29

Yes Catholicism states quite clearly that atheism is a sin. Disbelieving God means that you are rebelling against God's commands and therefore sinning. Bible Atheism, throughout the Bible, is considered "disbelief". The idea is either that you believe in God, or you don't. If you don't believe in the one true God (such as atheism), it's categorized as ...


27

Over the ages, many things have been written, and many things have been believed. I appreciate that the Bible has many believers, but that by itself is evidence of only one thing: that the Bible has many believers. As noted in a previous answer - if we are not required to reason a view, we can state anything as fact. Thus there is a burden of proof on both ...


24

There are several classical arguments for believing in God, including: The cosmological argument, which says that (logically) everything exists because it is caused by something else or because it has always existed. It says that everything that has been caused by something else must be caused by something else and so on until you get to something that is ...


18

The Bible is very clear that all atheists and non-believers will be sent to the Lake of Fire after they die. It even goes further than that by specifying a list of people that are not accepted (which covers more than your question!): Revelations 21:8 (NIV) But the cowardly, the unbelieving, the vile, the murderers, the sexually immoral, those who ...


15

The obvious rebuttal is that atheism can hardly be considered "the default position" when the very concept was almost completely unheard of throughout world history, in any culture, up until just a few centuries ago. Humans have an intuitive understanding of cause and effect, and the default position is to take this to its logical conclusion and believe in ...


15

I'd give a similar answer to this question as I did the other one, except that having read some of these books already, I doubt I could read them now without being nauseated by what I'm reading. There are certain things that, once you read them, you can't get them out of your head. (pornography, for example). I've read some very anti-Christian books and ...


14

You must read any of these books the same way you would read the Bible and any other work for that matter: in context. Any deeper examination of your faith by asking question or reading arguments counter to your beliefs, if read earnestly, and in the spirit of truly wanting more understand should only draw you closer to your faith. For instance "The God ...


14

If it is impossible for Atheists to be moral because they don't acknowledge the same source of morality that Christians recognize, then I would argue that it is also impossible for Christians to be moral, because neither do they fully understand the source of morality that they claim to attempt to adhere to. And without full understanding, it is impossible ...


14

Romans 3:23 (NIV) for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God No one is righteous. Better is not enough. God demands 100% holiness. No one can achieve that. Therefore, we need the Blood of Jesus Christ. Only in Jesus, can we have salvation. Romans 5:12 (NIV) Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through ...


12

This is a question that is not really cut and dried. There is a huge amount of very accurate information in this article summarising different beliefs on it. Summarizing the summary: One viewpoint is the Restrictivist Position. Most Fundamentalists and many other Evangelicals continue the Restrictivist beliefs taught by traditional Christianity. They ...


11

Atheists certainly argue that they can live according to a moral standard (here is one summary of many--since atheism isn't one belief, there are many viewpoints). Indeed, some atheists (Sam Harris being one of the most prominent and vocal of these) argue that Christianity leads people to abandon common-sense morality in certain instances and thus, at least ...


11

The reason why the non-existence of something should be the default position, is that the opposite (being able to assume that something exists just because nobody has been able to disprove it) allows one to prove that anything exists.


10

My thinking on this starts with Paul: For though I am free from all, I have made myself a servant to all, that I might win more of them. To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews. To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. To those outside the law I became ...


10

Logical Existence of God There is a very cogent line of reasoning presented in the book, I don't have enough faith to be an atheist, that goes something like this. The physical universe consists of time, space, and matter. Science has proven that the universe had a beginning--the Big Bang. Nothing can create itself. Whatever caused the universe to begin ...


10

St. Thomas Aquinas outlines five ways of knowing, from reason alone, that God exists. These are tough to understand without a background in classical philosophy -- it's commonly assumed, for example, that the first and second ways (Unmoved Mover and First Cause) depend on demonstrating the absurdity of an infinite series reaching back in time. But properly ...


10

A change in doctrine, if it is possible at all, can only be expressed with a definitive statement ex cathedra. The Pope wrote in his letter Le accolga come la risposta tentativa e provvisoria, Please accept this as a tentative and provisional response so no, it does not express any change in doctrine. In the English translation, the Holy Father ...


10

Do Christian concepts of fellowship allow for a congregation to welcome atheists to participate in their community? In the most general terms, yes - most congregations are open to non-member participation. Saying that, it is possible different congregations have a nuanced stance in this regard - some of their meetings may be closed and it is best to ...


9

As an Atheist, I'd like to think I'm leading a Moral life. Some examples: I give copious amounts of my income to charity, most recently via Humble Bundle 3 I have a job that affords me many chances to make a difference in people's lives for the better, within the limits of my own physical means. When I drive; I let other drivers into my lane, don't cut ...


9

You would have been excommunicated by the church and shunned by the community. But then again, for some individuals, the solace that comes from "having the courage of your convictions" and "being right" may have made that option more palatable (see de Tocquville below). People would have thought you odd, and possibly a public health hazard. (After all, God ...


8

Clearly Faith cannot be the default position if you ask whether God exists, because if your question is not rhetorical, but strives to be balanced, then you cannot start by assuming that God exists. The same applies to Atheism. So clearly the default position is agnosticism. That said, a few points are also pretty obvious: there is no factual evidence ...


8

First, define a Christian ;p It actually isn't as simple as you'd think - for example, consider the definition this site uses: As far as the scope of this site is concerned, any group that identifies themselves as Christian are to be considered on-topic and allowed to label themselves Christian. You would perhaps need to ask the author, but "cultural ...


6

I ask this a bit tongue in cheek. But why do Christians have to make arguments starting from atheism? It seems obvious to me that God exists. However, The rationalists' view of argumentation is that one presents statements that logically cohere and are backed up by evidence that anyone can, in principle, confirm. That something "seems obvious" is not ...


6

(Disclaimer: I'm Catholic, speaking for me, but I think that this agrees with the main official/majoritarian catholic belief) Even if we could read into the mind of person, to know his most sincere and precise beliefs, we could never deduce from that he will be saved or not. In principle, it's perfectly possible - as long as the atheism of the atheist ...


6

I'm going to give a slightly different understanding of this than you may have heard before, largely because I've faced up to the same thing and wondered the exact same thing. The question comes down to this: "Isn't believing in something simply the same as doing something? Isn't it a work in and of itself?" This question always bothered me. Here's the ...


5

You seem to be missing a fundamental part of the premise of Christianity: it's not a discovered or invented religion, but a revealed religion. The precepts and doctrines exist because God actively taught them to people. And should the knowledge of the truth be lost, hypothetically speaking, he would reveal the truth to new people whose hearts were open to ...


5

I would like to quote the apologetic mandate verse 1 Corinthians 7:1-2 (New International Version) We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ. The new atheist movements books as hard as they are to swallow is good books to have under ...


5

Not exactly the answer you are looking for, but Paul clearly understands humanity to be functionally atheistic, if not in practice. From Romans 1: 18 The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness, 19 since what may be known about God is plain to them, ...


5

The inquisitors official purpose for inquisitorial penalties (which were torture, imprisonment, and not uncommonly, death) quoniam punitio non refertur primo & per se in correctionem & bonum eius qui punitur, sed in bonum publicum ut alij terreantur, & a malis committendis avocentur or roughly: for punishment does not take place ...



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