Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

It is a sculpture created by Publius Cincius Salvius. It was a former Roman fountain; Fontana Della Pigna. It predates the Vatican owning the land. Mathematics Magazine The colossal bronze pine cone was cast in the 1st or 2nd century by Publius Cincius Salvius who left his name on the base. This was way before the Catholic Church was given the ...


10

From the title of the picture, I feel it is safe to assume the author had this in mind: Matthew 4:1-4 1 Then was Jesus led up of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil. 2 And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungred. 3 And when the tempter came to him, he said, If thou be the Son of ...


8

The Bible has many descriptions of angels, and in some cases they obviously appear as men, because they are mistaken for men. The angel of the LORD came and sat down under the oak in Ophrah that belonged to Joash the Abiezrite, where his son Gideon was threshing wheat in a winepress to keep it from the Midianites. When the angel of the LORD appeared to ...


8

There are likely many drawings of similar content, but I suspect by far the most famous one is this drawing of Dirk Willems, which was published in the book Martyrs Mirror in 1685. It illustrates the true story of Dirk Willems who had escaped from prison (where he was being persecuted for his faith), but when his persuer broke through some thin ice, Dirk ...


8

It is a copy or replica of a painting by Roberto Ferruzzi called "Madonnina" (commonly known as the "Madonna of the Streets"). The original has slightly different colours, different facial features, and it is in more of an impressionistic style, with thick visible brush strokes. I think the painting in the question is probably this following one, because ...


7

All so called Christian art is Biblically based; and is intended to induce some reflection of some event in Biblical History otherwise it would not be Christian art. Even going back to the old Masters, much or even most of their artworks were based on their concept of some event from the Bible. The picture you asked about along with many other paintings are ...


7

Even if the premise that Christ had longer hair is true, it would not matter as that is not the point of this passage. If it is read in context i.e. read the chapter before and after, it is clear that Paul is talking about how Jewish customs and how even though they are no longer necessary due to Christ's sacrifice, they should still be observed if you are ...


7

Popular Mechanics (of all sources) did a good article on "The Real Face of Jesus". The article discusses how the current representations of Jesus came to be. The European image with long wavy brown hair that we're all familiar with in Western cultures isn't universal at all. Rather, it seems to simply have been an image that artists rendered, and that we, ...


6

While I don't know of any other attempts to sample the Bible, I don't see any reason another method couldn't be tried. However, I would be reluctant to endorse another method that focuses on individual verses because context matters a great deal when it comes to exegesis (i.e. interpretation). Take for instance: For when they rise from the dead, they ...


6

Haloes are not limited to Christian art but have been used in depictions of key figures from lots of religions and cultures, including Ancient Greece, Buddhism, Islam and others. They don't have a Biblical basis and aren't intended to suggest there was a visible halo around the actual people depicted. The Wikipedia article on the subject is quite ...


6

Being as there is no image of Jesus that has any historical credibility, the question is based on a faulty premise. We simply do not know what Jesus' hair looked like. The paintings to which you allude tend to be those painted by the European masters in the 16th & 17th Centuries. At the time, it was fashionable for men to have longer hair, and thus it ...


5

Catholics portray, worship, and promote Jesus in all of His states of being, actions, words, etc. A strong emphasis is placed on his suffering and death on a cross because it was in this act that He atoned for the sins of all humanity. This is the single most important thing He did because without it, we have no hope. Paragraph 623 of the Catholic ...


5

Spikenard has nothing in particular to do with Joseph. What is going on, is the following. There is an apocryphal tradition to do with how Joseph and Mary were married. Variants of the story can be found in the Protoevangelium of James, Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, Armenian Infancy Gospel, Book of the Nativity of Mary, and History of Joseph the Carpenter; and ...


5

Michael the Archangel is depicted in the Bible as a warrior and leader of angel armies: Daniel 12:1 (ESV) At that time shall arise Michael, the great prince who has charge of your people. And there shall be a time of trouble, such as never has been since there was a nation till that time. But at that time your people shall be delivered, everyone whose ...


3

In the Luke account, Joseph and Mary had just walked about 60 miles from Nazareth to the Jerusalem suburbs (Bethlehem is about 5 miles away.) The countryside is hilly, and there are some dangerous places too. Personally, if I'm walking more than a mile or so, I'm going to take a stick. And, if I've got a pregnant girl I need to protect, I'm doubly sure I'm ...


3

 A drawing depicting the beauty of a person is not inherently wrong, and in the end it's the eye of the beholder that is at fault, yet how much is the artist responsible? Is it only the intent, only the result? both? It certainly is not the result. Even a Satanic Bible is just ink. Jesus answered the same kind of question: “Don’t you see that whatever ...


3

Wikipedia says: However, the cross symbol was already associated with Christians in the 2nd century, as is indicated in the anti-Christian arguments cited in the Octavius[6] of Minucius Felix,


3

Love is the Greatest Commandment While none of the Biblical authors mention art specifically, they do offer some guidance in regards to the use of our freedom. 1 Corinthians 8:13 (NASB) Therefore, if food causes my brother to stumble, I will never eat meat again, so that I will not cause my brother to stumble. Paul's statement (probably) employs ...


2

Good Question. There is a history to those Sibyl. First of all, the word Sibyl means Prophetess, and this word was originated from Greek. Erythrean Sibyl appears as the one who has prophesied the Redemption in arts. Persian Sibyl seems to be the priestess who occupied over Apollo Oracle. Libyan Sibyl was priestess who was the presiding over ...


2

It is very likely what you were seeing was a picture of a relic. From Wikipedia: "A relic usually consists of the physical remains of a saint or the personal effects of the saint or venerated person preserved for purposes of veneration as a tangible memorial." If you think seeing a picture of a limb is odd, then you would be really taken back by ...


2

I don't really think this question is on-topic for this site, since it's not about Christianity. It's probably not really on topic on any SE site, since it's just a discussion topic, and the only authoritative source for an answer died 49 years 11 months ago today. Having said that, I think the best answer I can provide to your question: When he said ...


1

The only strange animals in the Bible are the pre-historic ones mentioned in Job Leviathan Rahab (Also psalm 89) and Behemoth Imaginationless bible scholars have equated Behemoth and Leviathan with hippos and crocodiles. And I answered this question about Rahab a while back, she sounds pretty interesting, probably some sort of dragon! and the ...


1

According to Wikipedia, the halo was initially used for Jesus as a symbol of His Glory. Applied to the saints, it could be the outpouring of God's Glory, often talked about in the Bible, where the living water would flow from you, or His Light shine from you. If the position of the halo is usually from the Head of the body then I would make the assumption ...


1

Scripture doesn't address this directly. The closest relevant verses I can think of are: Psalm 101:3 (KJV) I will set no wicked thing before mine eyes: I hate the work of them that turn aside; it shall not cleave to me. This would be an example of a (good) decision to not regard (or even look at) certain things. Things that would be depictions of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible