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18

Even if we can't pray away someone else's free will or convince God to bend the rules regarding the requirements of salvation, there can still be merit in praying on behalf of others with a slightly different attitude. Perhaps "let them have experiences that will lead them to the truth," or "let their hearts be softened, that they may give heed to the Holy ...


11

I can only speak from a Wesleyan-Arminian perspective. A classical Arminian may have a slightly different understanding. God is both creator and ruler of the universe. As creator he has exercised complete sovereignty; God made all the decisions in setting everything up (Genesis 1), including setting up the means by which we could be saved (Romans 3:21-26). ...


8

With all due respect to Mark Hausam, the logic just doesn't hold water. That sounds like a category error. Category Errors These fallacies occur because the author mistakenly assumes that the whole is nothing more than the sum of its parts. However, things joined together may have different properties as a whole than any of them do ...


8

"Predestination" It is not that Arminians argue "against" predestination - that would be silly, since the term comes from Scripture; Arminians would have to cross out a whole bunch of verses in their Bibles if that were the case. Clearly "predestination" is a reality. The question is, what does that mean, and how does that work? In general, Calvinists ...


7

John Wesley was a five-point Arminian, but he accepted Calvinists as true Christians. He welcomed Calvinist preacher George Whitefield into the Methodist movement and sent him out to preach throughout the American colonies. In much of Wesley's own preaching he focused on the things that we have in common as Christians, but you can see examples of his ...


7

In John Piper's talks on Calvinism, he addresses this very point - why pray or even evangelise the non-saved since God has already elected who will be saved and who not. His answer is that our action is the means by which God often achieves His will. So if God has ordained that Bob will be saved through the witness of Jim, then Jim will witness and Bob will ...


6

I would say that yes, through free will a man can accept God's offer of grace and salvation. I believe God gives us the freedom to choose so that when we do choose to accept His grace, it is a conscious, humble, obedient choice. That does not mean that God cannot force someone to accept his grace, but I'm not sure there is any evidence of God doing that. ...


5

Background Although Calvinism and Arminianism are often presented as polar opposites, they have a common heritage. Jacobus Arminius studied under Calvinist teachers and was himself a Calvinist when he began his ministry. So it's not a surprise that the two systems share a common framework. But Arminius eventually questioned some of the tenets of Calvinism, ...


5

I would say your argument is entirely backwards. If the Lord has total sovereignty, then he can choose to let humans decide for themselves whether to accept salvation if that is what He wishes. Saying that God cannot possibly let humans freely choose whether or not to accept salvation is saying that God does not have total sovereignty. The question is ...


5

When I first read your question my immediate thought was it is not what is said here that shows the conflict with Calvinism but what is 'not said'. Interestingly enough I was trying to find proof of this impression and found the very same observation made my a modern Remonstrant with respect to the seventh article of the Methodist church. Original sin ...


5

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


4

Whether or not you'll find a theology that rejects everything in Calvinism and Arminianism is going to depend on how broadly you define those terms (as Calvinism can also encompass such issues as infant baptism, eschatology, and the relation of the OT civil law and modern day governance). But the closest you'll find (at least in matters of salvation) is ...


4

Baptists have historically combined the two perspectives as described in this answer. While the terms "General" and "Particular" Baptists don't have as wide a currency as they once did, they speak to the strains, as I described here: Eventually, there were two main camps of Baptists - "General" Baptists who believed in General atonement, i.e. anyone who ...


4

There are a few that attempt to do so. Both Calvinists and Arminians would say that any such attempt is internally inconsistent. I don't know of any "universally acknowledged system" of theology that does so, except perhaps for Amyraldism, which denies limited atonement but affirms the other four points of Calvinism. (Any Protestant denying a point of ...


3

That linked Wikipedia article is incorrect in it's description of free will. Both of the main views (Calvinism and Arminianism) assert a free will of sorts - man is not as bad as he could possibly be and we recognise that non-Christians can make good and bad decisions. Furthermore, both sides agree that an unregenerate sinner cannot do anything to please God ...


3

I can't speak much to the Lutheran or Calvinist view, but I can give my own perspective (Wesleyan Arminian): In the Arminian understanding, human beings were created by God as part of God's good creation, but we were given free will which enabled us to turn away from God's will. In order to bring us back, God provided the means of grace that enables us to ...


3

In Luke's gospel, Jesus informs Simon (Peter) that Satan had desired to try his faith to the verge of overthrow, but that, through the prayers of Jesus, his faith would be strengthened. He was further admonished to do the same for his brethren (strengthen them) once he had been converted (see Acts Chapter 2). Luke 22:31-32 And the Lord said, Simon, ...


3

John Wesley, in his explanatory notes on John 17, says, "The son of perdition signifies one that deservedly perishes; as a son of death, 2 Samuel 12:5; children of hell, Matthew 23:15, and children of wrath, Ephesians 2:3, signify persons justly obnoxious to death, hell, wrath. Psalms 109:8." To say someone deserves to perish is not the same as saying they ...


3

From http://www.theopedia.com/Arminianism Arminianism is a school of theology based on the teachings of Dutch theologian Jacob Arminius, for whom it is named. It is perhaps most prominent in the Methodist movement and found in various other evangelical circles today. It stands in contrast to Calvinism, with which it has a long history of debate. ...


2

Before we start building theology on this statement, we need to make sure we've understood it in its original context first, and that our extrapolations are faithful to that original intent. Who were Jesus' "sheep"? In Jesus' original context, He was talking with people who had not yet embraced Him about those who had already (at that time) embraced Him. ...


2

As an Evangelical (with Wesleyan soteriology - a particular form of Arminianism), my perspective is that we actually 'become' sheep at the point of Regeneration. Though our election to 'sheephood' was done in God's foreknowledge before the foundation of the world and the basis for our entrance to that state was purchased by Christ Jesus at the cross, the ...


2

In these "What would an Arminian say about..." questions, it's important to first denote what kind of Arminian you're talking about. There are 5 points of Arminianism: Human Free Will - This states that though man is fallen, he is not incapacitated by the sinful nature and can freely choose God. His will is not restricted and enslaved by his sinful ...


2

The confusion comes in when we conflate "salvation" with "ending up in Heaven for eternity." "Salvation" has three meanings in Scripture: Initial conversion (being "born again") Sanctification (of believers) Ultimate redemption (resurrection, etc.) It is clear that the first two can happen without the person necessarily ending up in Heaven for eternity, ...


1

Reformed Theology (Calvinism) does teach that God is absolutely in control over everything, which means predetermining every tiny detail. John Piper was asked the question 'Has God Predetermined Every Tiny Detail In the Universe, Including Sin?' (video and transcript), and he begun his answer with this: Yes. There's a great quote from Spurgeon ...


1

The Wesleyan Arminians recognised the problem implied by your analogy and resolved it by proffering the Governmental Theory of Atonement. Applying it your analogy: Christ has 'made' the payment at the cross, (and he can't unmake the payment - the cost to Him was real), but rather than a completed individual transaction on behalf of each sinner (the penal ...


1

Calvinists believe that man contributes nothing on the issue of justification. God is the sole source of salvation. Monergism teaches that God creates a desire to believe the Gospel in man, spiritual sensitivity, without which he would not understand, much less accept it. It requires regeneration, being made spiritually alive. 1 Corinthians 2:14 NET The ...


1

When tend to think of God as merely a very powerful human who nevertheless operates within the rules of the universe we understand. He doesn't. God is outside the universe. He created it, every feature of it. He created time, he created causality and thus set the laws of logic. To ask, what was god doing when he created time is to ask, "What time was it ...


1

Absolutely! It's impossible for nothing to happen when you pray. (Even if it looks like nothing will happen at all.) As it is written in Romans 4:9 (NIV) Abraham's faith was credited to him as righteousness. Faith is the currency of heaven, and it is through faith and prayer that spiritual battles are won. (Including the battle for the soul of the one ...


1

I speak from a Lutheran perspective. In our confession we say this - AC II.1. 1] Also they teach that since the fall of Adam all men begotten in the natural way are born with sin, that is, without the fear of God, without trust in God, and with 2] concupiscence; and that this disease, or vice of origin, is truly sin, even now condemning and bringing eternal ...


1

Seeing as I used to go to a Lutheran seminary but now find myself at a Presbyterian church, I hope I can help! Calvinists do in fact prefer the term total depravity, however it really only dIfferentiates from Lutheran concepts of original sin in name. Martin Luther was an Augustinian monk, and so is very influenced by his understanding of original sin that ...



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