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15

We need to be careful thinking that our English (or other language) translations always reflect God's Words perfectly. The word 'Ark' when referring to Noah's ark or the ark of bullrushes that Moses was placed into is the hebrew word 'teebah'. The word used for the Ark of the Covenant is 'arown'. I believe that there are similarities between the two as ...


13

An ark isn't a boat - it is a place of refuge - a container that protects things. Jews place their Torahs in an "ark" - a special box made to preserve the contents. The ark of the covenant was a box that protected and preserved the 10 commandments, Aarons rod, and an omer of manna. More importantly, despite the fact that when you say "ark" most people ...


11

No, the Bible does not. This is the last mention of the ark in the Old Testament: 2 Chronicles 35:3 And said unto the Levites that taught all Israel, which were holy unto the LORD, Put the holy ark in the house which Solomon the son of David king of Israel did build; it shall not be a burden upon your shoulders: serve now the LORD your God, and ...


8

The mercy seat is an incredibly dense and intertextual image, with a long history in Christian culture. Below is an illustration by Michiel van der Borch from a 1332 copy of the "Rhyme Bible" (which despite the name, does not rhyme and is not a Bible), showing many facets of the concept. 1 Here, God the Father sits on a throne that might look a bit like ...


6

There are several historical hints to the location of the Ark. Many of them are contradictory. The problem isn't so much finding historical evidence that points to possible current locations of the Ark, it's that we have no way of determining which, if any, are valid, true, and reliable. For example, ChristianAnswers.Net gives several possible locations. ...


5

The Ark of the Covenant is never recorded as having flown in Scripture. There were only two means by the Ark ever moved - Per God's command, the Ark was transported by the priests, using the Acacia poles which held it through the base, for this purpose. When the Priests carried it into the Jordan River when it was still flowing in Joshua 5, for example, ...


5

In his commentary on Hebrews 9:4, John Gill notes, but how this pot, as well as Aaron's rod, can be said to be in the ark, when it is asserted, at the bringing of the ark into the temple, at the dedication of it by Solomon, that there was nothing in it but two tables of stone, (1 Kings 8:9; 2 Chr. 5:10) and both the pot of "manna," and Aaron's rod, are ...


4

Some Christian factions include the Book of Maccabees in their Biblical cannon. From Wikipedia, The Books of the Maccabees are books concerned with the Maccabees, the leaders of the Jewish rebellion against the Seleucid dynasty, or related subjects. The term mostly refers to two deuterocanonical books contained in some canons of the Bible: 1 ...


3

It is believed that the Babylonians took the Ark during their conquest of Isreal. This belief is also disputed by those who believe it was hidden by the Jews so that it would not be carried off, but that no one knows where the Jews hid it. There is no (historical and factual) written information about where the ark went after the Babylonian conquest, and ...


3

The Catholic Catechism refers to the mercy seat explicitly in one paragraph: The name of the Savior God was invoked only once in the year by the high priest in atonement for the sins of Israel, after he had sprinkled the mercy seat in the Holy of Holies with the sacrificial blood. The mercy seat was the place of God’s presence. When St. Paul ...


3

The rabbis debate the meaning of the verse in Bava Batra 14b. מִצַּד is a rare combination, but it certainly means "beside" in Jos. 3:16, Jos. 12:9, Ruth 2:14, 1 Sam. 20:25. I see no instances where it can unequivocally be asserted to mean "in," "inside," or "within." Had Moshe intended to say that it was placed "inside" the Ark, why wouldn't he have written ...


2

Depending on the translation, it could be rendered "in the side" or "by the side" or "beside". The tablets given to Moses were kept inside the Ark, as was the rod that budded, and manna (Heb 9:4).


2

I think you'll find the story in the Kebra Negast, rather than the Bible. See Littman, Dr E, The Legend of the Queen of Sheba in the Tradition of Axum, Book 1 of Biliotheca Abessinica: Studies Concerning the Languages, Literature and History of Abyssinia, Princeton, Leyden and The University Library: E J Brill, 1904, p 11. As the story goes, King Solomon ...


1

Archaeologists have unearthed many items related to the Bible that we never knew still existed. Based on that, it's possible the Ark could still be uncovered in a dig somewhere. However, the question you meant to ask, I think, is: "Do we have enough information to hunt down and find the Ark?" And the answer is simply No, we do not. We don't have even the ...


1

I believe the answer would be in the original aramiac characters themselves. The word used for ark could be spelled tebah. Each character carries different meanings. 1st tauah or tav could denote wholeness or totality a mark, contiuance etc.2nd bayit or bet could denote a house establishment , manifestation etc..3rd hauah or het could denote light, ...



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