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17

It's very easy to look back thousands of years, once time has had plenty of time to change things, and say that there's no evidence for something and so it must be false. But it's a very different matter when there aren't thousands of years in the way. The Gospels were written in the first century AD, by people who experienced it personally, to their ...


13

The Wailing Wall was not part of the Temple - it was part of the Temple Mount - and a giant retaining wall for the courtyard on which the Temple sat. Here is a model of what we think it would have all looked like: Basically, when Herod restored the Second Temple, he couldn't expand the building itself, since it's dimensions were fixed by Scripture. He ...


13

Considering that the only references to this text are on websites attempting to campaign for the legalization of marijuana, I would say that this particular person and institution are complete fabrications. Wikipedia has no reference for this particular Archaeological society. On the other hand there was a prominent Jewish Rabbi named Dr. Isaac Cohen, but ...


12

Quite honestly I think you should submit this to Snopes. Every single last references to such an organization are found on websites of people trying to promote the legalization of marijuana, and they all follow almost the same format. No further linking is every provided and the wording is always the same. It sounds like an hoax that somebody made up and ...


9

Depending on the scope of this question, it can be very difficult to give any satisfactory answer to. Archaeology primarily concerns itself with artifacts that have been left behind from ancient days, whereas the Book of Mormon deliberately avoids going into too much detail on the culture of its people and explaining details that might aid archaeological ...


9

Minor clarification. While the Temple of Jerusalem was destroyed in 70AD, the city of Jerusalem retained its general street plan until 135 AD. In 135 AD, after the Bar Jakova Revolt, the already damaged city was razed to the ground. In its place, a Greek city called Aelia Capitolina was put in its place. As such, when Constantine's mother, Helena visited ...


9

Some commentators (such as the Institute for Creation Research) have suggested that Leviathan (otherwise a Hapax Legomenon) in Job 41 is a dinosaur. Not all agree, but it is at least "out there" as a theory. Prior to the 1820s, dinosaurs were unknown to (modern) man[1], so it is not surprising the are not mentioned in the Bible. (Indeed, the term would have ...


7

In addition to the various other roles that Missouri has in LDS history and teachings (see What is the LDS meaning of the New Jerusalem?), it is believed by most to be the location of the Garden of Eden. The LDS basis for this belief is founded largely on the teachings of Joseph Smith in the context of Doctrine & Covenants section 57 which reads that ...


6

Since there was only one set of plates, we could never expect to find direct archaeological evidence of them, as they are now in angelic custody. However, there ought to be indirect evidence that suggests their likely existence, and that is all this question can seek. The Book of Mormon points to a highly literate culture that existed in the Americas for ...


6

To answer your question, I would challenge you to learn as much about the American continent as you can for the date that the Book of Mormon was compiled (~400AD). You will quickly discover that there are no other surviving records from that time period at all.1 In fact, the oldest manuscript written in the Americas known by historians–the Dresden Codex–was ...


5

The search for the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah have been a common archaeological pursuit over the years. There have been some proposals, and I do recall seeing a documentary about a couple such sites, near the Dead Sea, which may be very likely the Biblical cities stated. It is difficult to say for absolute certain whether these are the cities mentioned in ...


5

As an archaeologist of Central Europe and adherent of processual paradigm, I'd argue that it's (almost) impossible to prove existence of a person archaeologically. But here we can join study of historical texts with archaeology and ignore the boundaries between these two disciplines. Archaeology itself without aid of written texts can say very little on ...


5

Boy is that wikipedia article riddle with citation needed around the part mentioning Joseph. The thing that points to Joseph being of the Hyksos, looks to be what I thought was the best evidence against it. If you didn't think of this yourself, permit me to state the obvious, The evidence is in where the bones went. Joseph wanted his bones buried where ...


5

Well, there are still no records of Joseph himself. From an objective perspective, these Hyksos could only be considered proof of the possibility of Joseph, not of Joseph himself. Yes, there is a record which says that it is quite possible that the stories of Genesis and Exodus represents some sort of mytho-symbolic truth, but that does not mean that the ...


5

Today, as well as in ancient times, it depends on where you are. A grave example is Romania. Under Ceaucescu the country underwent a forced industrialization that resulted in people flooding the cities. To make room they tore down houses and built high-rises. But as apartments (generally) was small etc. dogs were left on the streets where they was left to ...


4

You can start with the finder's website and this article from The Gospel Coalition. As to where to find more, Craig Evans might know.


3

The original Hebrew term is yam suph, and the correct English translation is Sea of Reeds, as explained by this article: The translation "Red Sea" is simply a traditional translation introduced into English by the King James Version through the second century BC Greek Septuagint and the later Latin Vulgate. It is possible that this "Sea of Reeds" was ...


3

There is a large and growing body of work by LDS scholars offering archaeological and anthropological evidence in support of the Book of Mormon: an introduction to it may be found on the FairMormon Wiki, However, it is not expected that such evidence will ever be conclusive.


3

For the New Testament, yes. Though Wikipedia may not be a "scholarly" source I find it good for this sort of thing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical_manuscript#Listings Also, in at least the UBS and NA, there is a list of manuscripts used to compile the "Greek New Testament." I think that the BHS contains something somewhat similar for the Hebrew ...


3

Historians believe that dinosaurs lived before humans. Therefore dinosaurs could be simply mentioned during the 2 days when God created the animals. Gen 1:20-25 God could consider dinosaurs simply animals, and there would be no reason for him to explicitly mention them.


2

Technically it is paleontology and not archaeology that is concerned with prehistoric fossils. There is a (mostly) good book that deals with creation and evolution (among other things) in a complimentary way: http://www.amazon.com/Science-God-Convergence-Scientific-Biblical/dp/1439129584 There is also the Six Dawns essay which does essentially the same ...


2

Well, there is a lot of debate about whether there was such a gate, but the disciples apparently didn't think there was, as their response is one of surprise, asking "but then, who can be saved?" To which Jesus replied "with men it is impossible but with God, all things are possible." Yes. No. The walls of the Old City are still basically as they were in ...


2

The only time Joseph is actually mentioned in an Egyptian text is the "Osarseph" report in the "Aegyptopaea", the Egyptian history of the Egyptian/Greek historian Manetho, thought to be written on the basis of Egyptian temple documents and by direction of king Ptolemy II of Egypt in Memphis around 300 B.C. In this report, Osarseph, a renegade priest of ...


2

It's worth noting that it would appear from the text that the Cities of the Plain (which include Sodom and Gomorrah) were destroyed by some type of meteor impact. If so, it's not likely that there was much left behind for modern archaeologists to find, especially considering the primitive state of construction technology back then. If a meteor were to wipe ...


2

We have a great deal of evidence for the histricity of the Book of Mormon but nothing comparable to what exists in support of the Bible. This is because archaeology in the Middle East is far in advance of archaeology in mesoamerica. The arid sands of the Middle East are an ideal environment for the preservation of artifacts. The humid Central American ...


2

The most credible arguments against the existence of Nazareth at the beginning of the first century are that the earliest pottery remains found at the site date to the Roman period, possibly no earlier than the first century, and that Josephus never mentioned the town, although he listed almost every town and village in first-century Galilee. However, this ...


1

I researched into this and found this page, Yam suph – Hebrew words literally rendered ‘Reed Sea’ You should really visit the page for a detailed explanation on why the Hebrews called the Red Sea, Reed Sea. Basically, reeds (freshwater plants) were seen on the shoreline of the Red Sea (saltwater). I assume that Moses and the Israelites did not have ...


1

I've come back from work and meeting and am free to research. However, I will just do another one as you have accepted another answer and it would look kinda silly for me to post a 10,000 word essay on dogs :P Though, I have to say I'm not sure why I missed the very first one in Exodus 11:7, it's probably due to the fact that I searched for "dogs" first ...


1

From http://www.biblegateway.com/keyword/?search=dog&version1=KJV&searchtype=all&limit=none&wholewordsonly=no, which is searching for the word "Dog" in the "King James Version", there are only 40 verses that mention dog/dogs. It's kinda surprising! The very first mention of the word dogs is among the Lord's Law to Moses in Exodus 22 29 ...



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