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"Eli Eli lama sabachthani?" is Greek transliteration of Aramaic words. If it was Hebrew, then azabthani would have been used instead of Aramaic word "Sabachthani." Check this link for Hebrew NT of Matthew 27. http://www.bayithamashiyach.com/Matthew_27.pdf In Hebrew, "Eli Eli lama sabachthani?" will become "Eliy ‘Eliy lamah `azab’taniy?" Here is an ...


7

This is going to sound strange, but the doctrine of preservation actually says it doesn't matter if every word was exactly preserved - what we have is what is important. As one example, there are five "variants" of the original Gettysburg Address. The text that I memorized in elementary school was actually drawn in part from each of these. I have no doubt ...


6

It's Syriac. Matthew Henry's commentary in the sidebar at this link says Christ’s prayer was bantered by them that stood by (Mark 15:35, 36); because he cried, Eli, Eli, or (as Mark has it, according to the Syriac dialect) Eloi, Eloi, they said, He calls for Elias, though they knew very well what he said, and what it signified, My God, My God. Thus did ...


6

If the narrative is followed from verse 35, one will note that the Roman soldiers were present throughout, they “sitting down they watched him”. Note not all but “some of them that stood there…said, this man calleth for Elias”. Spoken by a Roman soldiers that did not know Aramaic. Matthew 27:35 And they crucified him, and parted his garments, casting ...


5

The New Testament was written in Greek, but the Greek text records Jesus' words in Aramaic (in Mark, Hebrew in Matthew). The Gospel writers transliterated the Aramaic (Mk 15) and Hebrew (Mt 27) into the Greek script. It is important here to distinguish between script and language. For instance, I can write in Spanish, Latin, German, English, etc. all with ...


4

There is no way of knowing with 100% certainty what was actually said because we have no audio recordings, and there is no one alive to verify word for word what was said. The same goes for any religious/historical text once the speaker and listeners have died. The Gospels are not meant to be collections of sayings from Jesus; they contain sayings but that ...


3

It is clear that there is little reason to doubt that the New Testament we have was really close or even exactly what what originally written. There is a way to test the possibility of textual 'perversion' from the original texts. Historians commonly use a method called the bibliographical test. The test is quite simple and is meant to show the relative ...


1

An alternative, and somewhat simpler, explanation is that many of those present knew very well that Jesus was quoting the opening line of the 22nd Psalm; but through their willful blindness, determined to avoid seeing that Psalm's fulfillment manifested in the tableau in front of them, they allowed Satan to fill their heads with a suitably distracting ...


1

The ancient Eastern text translation, "My God, My God, for this (cause/purpose) was I spared," agrees with Jesus' own declaration to His disciples in John 12:27: "Now is My soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save Me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour." In the following verse, Jesus asks, "Father, glorify Thy name. ...


1

There are several evidences that New Testament was written in Aramaic. First century Israel spoke Aramaic. Not Greek. Jewish Historian and Priest Josephus tells us that Greek wasn't spoken in first century Israel and also "the extreme rarity" in terms of a Jew knowing Greek. Josephus wrote: "I have also taken a great deal of pains to obtain the learning of ...



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