Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Preface, this is a Protestant response. I'm not arguing the validity of it, or any claims here, just answering the question. the short Protestant response would be "Meh". A general Protestant response to each point would be: 1) Where in Scripture does it say there would be any such thing as Apostolic succession? The New Testament speaks of several ...


9

Pope Leo XIII's Bull Apostolicae Curae declared the Anglican orders invalid because the sacramental form was changed in such a way to render them invalid. There's the "Old Catholic" (they reject Vatican I) line which may be valid. I think this is in dispute. The Orthodox line is considered valid because they didn't change the sacramental form of ...


8

The Catholic Church teaches that Apostolic Succession is necessary because it was instituted by the original Apostles. Other denominations claims are similar. From the Catholic Encyclopedia: It remains to consider whether the so-called "monarchical" episcopate was instituted by the Apostles. Besides establishing a college of presbyter-bishops, did ...


7

As an Eastern Orthodox, I've never heard this line of reasoning. Instead, what is usually discussed is the difference between primacy and supremacy. In the Orthodox view, among all the bishops, there were five who were regarded as preeminent based on the importance of their sees. These were: Rome Constantinople Alexandria Antioch Jerusalem The ...


6

James Black's answer was a good, but a tad confusing. The apostolic succession is authority behind the teaching office of the bishop. The Churches in communion with Rome are various rites of the Universal Church. That is why it's such a fallacy to even use the term Roman Catholic. It's really the just the Latin Rite and the Pope is the leader of all the ...


6

When Luther was excommunicated for insubordination on January 3, 1521, he lost the ability to say he was in the chain. You cannot succeed someone who has disowned you. Note the date to which most people would ascribe the "beginning of the Protestant Reformation" (a bad term since it was really a process that had been going on since the 1300s!) is October ...


6

I won't be able to give a complete answer as I'm not that familiar with the Catholic and Orthodox church structure, but Biblical church structure is something I've been looking into recently so here is what I've found out. The Pope I believe the argument for having one man overseeing the entire church comes from Jesus statement to Peter in Matthew 16:18 ...


5

Henry Chadwick writes about this in his book The Early Church (Penguin, 1993), on page 50. First he explains that the role of the "bishop" (episkopos) evolved to be a primus among the elders (presbyters) in the late apostolic or early post-apostolic era. But it would take a while until the bishop received a more formal recognition as a separate tier of ...


4

Full Disclaimer: I am an Eastern Orthodox Christian who is a former Protestant Christian. I have addressed how Protestants might respond to these points, with the understanding that Protestants are a very broad group with many differing beliefs on these issues. With that said, these responses must necessarily be broad and somewhat varied. According to ...


4

The same way that the Catholics do. Anglicans consider themselves catholic and reformed. The Anglican church was the Catholic Church in England until the reformation when they stopped recognizing the authority of the Pope. "The roots of the Church of England go back to the time of the Roman Empire when Christianity entered the Roman province of ...


3

Yes a number of churches other than the Roman Catholic Church believe in the Apostolic succession. A good example is the Church of England, which also follows the commonly accepted definition of Protestant (though it considers itself somewhat different from most other Protestant churches, largely because of the belief in Apostolic Succession). Specifically ...


3

Christ gave St. Peter the "power of the keys" to bind or loose. Addressing the question of "Whether priests alone have the keys?," St. Thomas Aquinas writes: There are two kinds of key. One reaches to heaven itself directly, by remitting sin and thus removing the obstacles to the entrance into heaven; and this is called the key of "order." Priests ...


2

An apostle is, per the Greek ἀποστέλλω (apostollow) - that is, sent out. It is a job, not necessarily a title. Jesus, in the Great Commission of Matthew 28, literally apostolt (ie commissioned and sent out) all of his followers by telling them: Go ye therefore into all the world... While Matthew 28:16 says there were only 11 people there (all his ...


2

As a protestant...Why do churches which hold to Apostolic succession require it? The Christian churches that cling to Apostolic Succession, such as the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Catholic Church, teach that the legitimate authoritative succession of bishops is taught in both Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. History also clearly ...


2

The Protestant movement at least began as a turning to the scriptures to define belief; I think that Bible-believing Protestants would start there. The leaders of the Protestant movements all saw conflict between traditional Orthodox/Catholic teachings and the plain teachings of scripture. I'll address the 2nd issue first: Jesus instituted the sacrament of ...


2

1521 might be the Roman Catholic answer to this question, but the Eastern Orthodox answer is a bit harder to give. The Roman Catholic Church lost its apostolic succession in splitting off from the Orthodox Church (remember, this is the Orthodox perspective). As late as 1274 and then at 1438, there were still attempts at reunion between the Roman Catholics ...


2

Apparently different Lutheran churches have different practices, with two Scandinavian state churches being the most notable proponents of apostolic succession (source): Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Finland Church of Sweden These churches don't have the Sacrament of Holy Orders, as Luther rejected it. Still, bishops, priests and deacons are ordained, ...


2

There are some groups from the Eastern Catholic churches that are recognized, and in communion with Rome, but for much of the Eastern Orthodox churches this is not the case, and the issue of apostolic succession is a sticking point on full communion. From this link I will paste what is most likely the complete answer. There are some Episcopalean churches ...


1

At the time of the reformation, many of the bishops of the Church of England, including the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cramner, were already recognized as consecrated bishops by the Roman church since they had been consecrated prior to the reformation. Apostolic succession in the Anglican communion is traced through these bishops. The the Churches of ...


1

The only 3 Traditions that teach apostolic succession are Catholicism, Orthodoxy, and Anglicanism. These Traditions do not argue for prophetic succession, simply because the biblical role of prophet is inherently different from the biblical role of apostle, making it impossible to conceptually assign succession to both. First, let’s compare the words ...


1

United Methodists have a "clandestine" form of apostolic succession. John Wesley an Anglican priest and founder of the Methodism movement was secretly and illicitly consecrated a bishop by a rogue Greek Orthodox Bishop named Erasmus. There is much debate as to whether the succession from Wesley onward was validly continued or whether there is a break in the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible