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23

Yes! Errr... NO! There are three competing theories on this. Jesus went to Hell with the damned. Jesus went to paradise in Hades Jesus went to heaven. All of these beliefs are based on a few critical verses. Verse 1: 1 Peter 3:18-20 In 1 Peter 3:18-20 (NIV), we see: 18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, to ...


11

The wording of that creed has caused confusion among untold thousands of people over the past millennium and across scores of languages. For as much consternation as it has spawned, the intended meaning is really very simple. The word catholic in the a Apostle's Creed is being used as an adjective, not a proper name! A quick English dictionary search will ...


9

First, it's important to understand that a biblical understanding of hell is not as cut and dry as we might like it to be. That's another discussion. Second, the Nicene creed, which is most widely used creed across Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant, simply says: he suffered death and was buried. with no mention of hell. Third, any orthodox (that's ...


8

It was a creed that was developed by the early church. It came into existence after the age of the apostles. However, it finds its biblical basis in the apostles. From here, in its current form more likely post-Nicene Creed in the early 4th Century AD. From here, it sounds like it was a later form of the Old Roman Creed. The Nicene Creed (since that's ...


7

YES, He did. 1 Peter 3:19-20 (NIV) 19 After being made alive, he went and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits— 20 to those who were disobedient long ago when God waited patiently in the days of Noah while the ark was being built. In it only a few people, eight in all, were saved through water, Those disobedient spirits are obviously in ...


5

Did Jesus spend time in the place of eternal punishment? I would answer, "no." The Text of the Apostles' Creed (Symbolum Apostolorum) in Latin Credo in Deum Patrem omnipotentem, Creatorem caeli et terrae, et in Iesum Christum, Filium Eius unicum, Dominum nostrum, qui conceptus est de Spiritu Sancto, natus ex Maria Virgine, passus sub Pontio ...


4

As a Big 'C' Catholic I'd have to disagree with Caleb's post on principle. But no holy wars or anything, I promise. Catholics, like some Protestant congregations, truly consider themselves the Universal Church. Unlike other Protestant congregations however, we do not consider non-Catholics (or not-us'es) to not be Christians. But, when Catholics say ...


3

I can't dig up the scriptural reference right now, but it is my recollection that Jesus preached the Gospel to the souls of those already departed in Hades, which is what the creed refers to. It's not that Jesus in any way suffered in Hades, but that he went there and released souls. Also, Hades is, in Greek mythology, a place where the dead reside and ...


3

Wikipedia has a good article on the concept. The phrase means that Christians are united in the Body of Christ, a teaching based on 1 Corinthians 12 (and some other passages).


3

Catholic means universal, in that membership in the church, the people of God, isn't restricted according to ethnicity or nationality.


2

This will take a bit of work...But thankfully, the work has already been done :) If you go to Volume 2 of Charles Hodge's Systematic Theology, p 591, you will there see a pretty good treatment of Christ's Death and Burial. (Search for "Christ humbled Himself even unto death, and continued under the power of death for a time." minus the quotes in the pdf) ...


1

Luke 16:23 tells us that the rich man went to a place called Hades. "And in Hell, he lift up his eyes being in torments" The Bible describes the rich mans experience in Hades as "being in torments". Acts 2:27 clearly states that Jesus soul was not left in Hades and that implies his soul was there but was not left there permanently. Earlier in verse 24 of ...



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