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22

You don't need to (as in should), but you can if you want to. Don't allow them any special authority if they're not in your Bible; use common sense. Apocryphal books and other writings of the time might be interesting in many ways, e.g. historically. There's an important distinction to be made between 1&2 Maccabees and the Gospel of Thomas. This ...


14

Treat them as you would any other work by an author who claims to be Christian. Weigh what is said carefully against scripture and evaluate it for what value it has. Knowing why it was rejected (was it heretical or known to be falsified or simply not surely inspired) might help in such an evaluation. Personally I have found the extra-biblical works quite ...


10

Neither of your options is correct. Catholics typically refer to what Protestants call the Apocrypha (1-2 Macabees, Sirach, etc.) as deuterocanonical books, and they do include them in the Bible as inspired, God-given writings. They were in use in the church from before the NT times, and IIRC, it was Jerome that gave them the name "apocrypha" and the ...


10

There's a few notions, but no doctrine, as the domain of doctrine in the Catholic Church is encompassed entirely by the New Testament insofar as it is the fulfillment of the entire Old Testament. But, here's a sampling off the top of my head: Tobit Archangel Rapahel in the heavenly host Respect for burying the dead as a corporal work of mercy ...


8

The books known as "apocryphal" defined by Protestants are defined by Catholics as "Deuterocanonical" (a second canon) comes from Septuagint, a Greek translation (with these additional books) of Hebrew Tanakh. Which later around 4th century, was translated by St. Jerome to Vulgate, a Latin edition of the OT. Besides the Catholic Church, the Constantinople ...


8

Not part of my definition of apocrypha, but reading Wisdom leaves you with a distinct feeling that that the messiah is coming and he's going to be very badly treated. I won't post all of Wisdom 2 here, but make sure if you read it, that you don't cut up the verses, these are bad people talking bad things about a righteous Man. For, not thinking ...


7

This question would not have even made sense to anyone prior to Copernicus, let alone to anyone who originally heard or received this image. When this story was first received, there would have been no other body for him to land on. The earth was the center of all, and the "wandering stars" aka other planets, were just lights in the sky. One of the most ...


6

Yes, there are several (Sirach and Enoch for example). In fact Jude quotes the book Enoch. Jude 1:14-15 14 And Enoch also, the seventh from Adam, prophesied of these, saying, Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands of his saints, 15 To execute judgment upon all, and to convince all that are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds ...


6

Parts of this answer is taken directly from the Catechism of the Catholic Church (1994) which carries the seal of Imprimi Potest, by which the Catholic Church recognizes the publication to be free of doctrinal error (as I understand it). On the Inspiration and Truth of Sacred Scripture, attesting to divine authorship: 105 God is the author of Sacred ...


6

As has been said already, you can read (and it can be interesting) the apocrypha. Just don't consider them as authoritative. I'd like to complete the other answers by stating a difference between the Old Testament apocrypha and the New Testament apocrypha. The Old Testament apocrypha, such as the Maccabees, are not included in the Jewish Canon (and thus ...


4

I'm not sure which specific councils you're referring to, but for the sake of this answer I'll assume it's the first four ecumenical councils. The Apocryphal writings were not the primary focus of these councils; doctrinal concerns were (the Trinitarian and Christological heresies). Here is a brief summary of these councils: Nicaea I (325 CE): Summoned ...


3

The simple answer is that is was God’s permissive will to send the Devil to where He placed Adam and Eve in the garden. If Adam was on Mars then the Devil would have been sent there. So the answer is similar to ‘Why did God create the tree?’ ‘Why did God allow sin?’ ‘Why did God not turn the Devil into jelly-beans?’ ‘Why did God not prevent the temptation ...


3

Having been a Mennonite for all my adult life, and attending a Mennonite Brethren church for the last 8 years or so, I have never heard of The Shepherd of Hermas, or any of the other books you mentioned. However, Mennonites, and many other denominations, often use written resources in sermons, corporate worship (recitations, hymns, songs), etc, that are ...


2

The definition of sin is to miss the mark. So then the question is would reading those apocryphal books be missing the mark? I think that depends on your intent. If one reads those books and places their faith in them, then, yes, that is missing the mark. If one reads those books in order to learn why some people believe in them so that one can have ...


1

In Biblical cosmetology, "Heaven" is the sky, and "Earth" is the ground. Naturally, anything that falls from the sky is going to hit the ground.


1

In the Episcopal Church in the USA, excerpts from the Apocrypha are read in services. But the Apocrypha is not a source for doctrine. We pray for the dead, as do Catholics around the World. This idea is confirmed in Macabees, and it has always been part of the Church Liturgy since the beginning. In the examination for Holy Orders in the ACC it is required: ...


1

The current Jewish canon did not arise until after the time of Christ. The Old Testament apocrypha were in the Greek translation of the Bible known as the Septuagint, which is older than any existing version of the Bible except for books found relatively recently among the Dead Sea Scrolls. The standard Hebrew version of the Bible that exists is much newer ...



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