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9

Technically, a couple of different terms are being confused in the question. Conditionalism is the teaching that immortality / eternal life is conditional upon a right standing with God. Annihilationism is the teaching that anyone who is ultimately unrepentant will cease to exist, usually after a period of torment that accommodates to the amount of evil ...


8

Jehovah's Witnesses do not believe that there is a soul that survives the death of the body. We believe that, at death, a person ceases to exist, since the body simply returns to the "dust". (Genesis 3:17-19) This makes sense if you think about people who have brain damage (a damaged body): their consciousness is affected by this. Our consciousness is not an ...


8

Short answer: Jehovah's Witnesses do not believe in Hell. Longer answer: Technically, Jehovah's Witnesses do believe in Hell, but (a) their beliefs about Hell are quite unusual, and (b) they generally don't use the name "Hell". (So it's simpler to say they don't believe in Hell.) Even longer answer: The Biblical words usually translated as "Hell" are the ...


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Q. "Do Jehovah's Witnesses believe in annihilation?" A. Yes. We whole heartedly believe in what is stated under divine inspiration of God's holy spirit found at 2 Thessalonians 1:6-10 and 2 Peter 3:7... and I quote: "This takes into account that it is righteous on God’s part to repay tribulation to those who make tribulation for YOU, 7 but, to YOU who ...


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I think the misunderstanding here is that the wicked are resurrected and then killed. I'm not sure there's a Biblical backing for the idea that those who rejected Christ will again be separated from their bodies. Their souls will be in bodies when they are cast into the lake of fire. Therefore, the punishment is eternal, physical, punishment in the ...


2

In the Summa Theologica (First Part, Question 104, Article 3), Aquinas asks "Whether God can annihilate anything?" He concludes, Some have held that God, in giving existence to creatures, acted from natural necessity. Were this true, God could not annihilate anything, since His nature cannot change. But, as we have said above, such an opinion is entirely ...


1

Opening Making a distinction between a mortal thing and to annihilate something. With the former, a mortal thing can be killed, made to die, die, with the latter, an annihilated thing is reduced to nothing. From a Catholic perspective, to create means to call [a being] into existence out of nothing. CCC IN BRIEF 318 No creature has the infinite ...


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First, the idea of the immortality of the soul comes from the Greek dualistic view of body and soul as separate, with a mortal body and an immortal soul. Immortality belongs to God alone (I Tim. 6:16) in the sense of before creation and on to eternity. God offers eternal life (John 3:15–16; 10:28; 17:2; Rom. 2:7; 6:23; 1 Cor. 15:42f; 50, 54; Gal. 6:8; 1 ...


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From the wikipedia article on Annihilationism (4th paragraph): Some Christian denominations which are annihilationist were influenced by the Millerite/Adventist movement of the mid-19th century. These include the Seventh-day Adventists, Bible Students, Christadelphians and the various Advent Christian churches. Additionally, the Church of England's ...



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