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12

I think the only answer anyone can really give is, "No one knows." The most obvious reading is that before this, serpents walked upright, and that got changed them that day as a sign of the degradation of Satan. It's also possible that the intended meaning is that serpents always looked pretty much like they do now, but with this incident God used the fact ...


11

There is an interesting passage in the Pentateuch: “If a bull gores a man or woman to death, the bull is to be stoned to death, and its meat must not be eaten. But the owner of the bull will not be held responsible. If, however, the bull has had the habit of goring and the owner has been warned but has not kept it penned up and it kills a man or woman, ...


9

The short answer is "yes, sort of". The only sub-group within Christianity that I'm aware of that cares about whether the animals in the Garden of Eden were originally carnivorous or not are the Young Earth Creationists. To other groups, it's simply a non-issue. Only within the young-earth paradigm do you get the idea that there was no physical death ...


9

This article on the Answers In Genesis website is a good introduction: https://answersingenesis.org/death-before-sin/did-death-of-any-kind-exist-before-the-fall/ One short quote: The Bible never uses the Hebrew term nephesh chayyah (living soul/creature) when referring to invertebrates, but it does when referring to humans and fish (Genesis 1:20; 2:7). ...


9

I'm not sure if the Church has an explicit doctrinal position on this question, but I can give you the view of classical philosophy, as originally expounded by Aristotle and then developed chiefly by St. Thomas Aquinas. This view undergirds the thinking of most orthodox Catholic theologians, historically speaking. In this way of thinking -- assuming you ...


9

In Genesis 2: 18-22, it states that animals were created to be companions for man, but that none of them was found worthy to be a true companion the way Eve was. It's interesting to note that God said to eat "of every tree of the garden" but nothing about eating flesh. But after the Fall introduced mortality to the world, the Lord made for Adam and Eve ...


7

As a YEC - I think David Stratton has presented a good overview of our belief regarding animals (and human beings) being herbivorous before the fall, and that we use the Bible as our only canonical writing (though as I commented on his answer, we do not believe that every word in the Bible is meant to be taken literally, there are many figurative and poetic ...


6

It's true that the Bible says that man has "dominion" over the animals: And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.” (Genesis 1:28, ESV) But there are many, many passages in the Bible ...


6

The explanation is quite simple. They had the same teeth, but they ate plants. Whether they struggled to eat plants is another question and mostly opinion based. Generally, Young Earth Creationists when challenged with this point, will note that there are examples of animals with carnivorous teeth, yet they are herbivorous. The most common example is the ...


6

"...is there any clear, unambiguous, direct statement in Scripture that tells whether or not animals/pets can go to heaven?" No. The topic isn't addressed in scripture anywhere.


6

As the only earthly critter created in the image of God, man (and woman) is the crowning act of creation by Elohim. The human species, remarkably enough, inhabits what appears to be a universe that is Planet-Earth-centered. This is not to say that our multi-galaxy universe is unimportant, or that critters other than human beings are unimportant. It is to ...


5

Just because you can't think of a reason why a wasp is useful, doesn't mean there isn't one. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2012/07/30/do-yeasts-survive-the-winter-in-the-guts-of-wasps/ Second, there are clearly species that do not exist to this day. There are species today that did not exist in the past. And yet every species that has ever ...


5

Now we define "intelligence" and "rationality" otherwise than Aquinas and other scholastic philosophers did. In Aquinas' teaching, reason or rationality is what we usually mean by intelligence - it's the ability to induce new knowledge by reasoning based on experience we get through senses. "Intelligence" was slightly trickier. According to Aquinas and his ...


5

No, there is no definitive statement in the Bible on this matter. It should be noted, however, that God asserts that both the current heaven and the current earth will pass away. Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will not pass away. Matthew 24:35 NASB But the day of the Lord will come like a thief, in which the heavens will pass away ...


4

Yes, the canonical writings of some (most?) Christian groups does say if animals in Eden were carnivorous and when they became carnivorous; and as for your title (bible as opposed to canonical Christian writings), also yes it is addressed. That is the blunt answer and technically a full one considering your question. However, you likely want to know not ...


4

As LCIII has noted, the answer to your question is "No, there is no clear, unambiguous, direct statement" to the question. So, how can anyone say that definitively? There are easily accessed tools that you can use. This post goes over a few that would probably be useful. 1. A Concordance The first tool that just about any pastor is going to use to ...


4

Today, as well as in ancient times, it depends on where you are. A grave example is Romania. Under Ceaucescu the country underwent a forced industrialization that resulted in people flooding the cities. To make room they tore down houses and built high-rises. But as apartments (generally) was small etc. dogs were left on the streets where they was left to ...


4

Strictly speaking, no creatures are entirely "necessary." While there are few (if any) issues to which all of Christendom offers a single response with unanimous support, one belief that is professed widely across traditions as well as Protestant denominations is that the God of the Bible is omnipotent. As such, he does not rely on any particular ecological ...


4

Probably the one point that evolutionists and creationists would agree on is that there is no such thing as an "unnecessary creature". Regardless of how we view the origins - the creations of an infinitely wise creator, or the result of eons of evolutionary processes, the simple fact remains that in most ecosystems, there is a balance, and each and every ...


4

I think Malachi offers a little more insight into this: When you offer blind animals in sacrifice, is that not evil? And when you offer those that are lame or sick, is that not evil? Present that to your governor; will he accept you or show you favor? says the LORD of hosts. - Malachi 1:8 ESV These are animals that would not be eaten or bred due to ...


3

Genesis 9:5 does say that animals are held responsible but I would say that this does not mean heaven or hell. A lot of the punishments in the Torah that are meted out are of the earthly origin. As Exodus 21:28-29 (mentioned by rajah9) makes it very clear, this punishment is of an earthly nature. I don't think these texts are talking about heaven or hell at ...


3

The other answer seems to largely explain it, and I was going to comment to add this but could not for want of rep. Genesis 9:3-4 states that: Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you; and just as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything. Only, you shall not eat flesh with its life, that is, its blood. (NRSVA) This seems to often ...


3

What is an animal with a defect? According to Deuteronomy 15:21 (NIV) lameness or blindness would be considered a defect. In my personal experience around cattle not having both testicles is a defect. So to protect the quality of your herd you wouldn't want to breed that animal back into the herd. It would however be o.k. for consumption. Even though I don'...


2

This answer is based on the Christian theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), and reflects the views of the "Swedenborgian" or "New Church" denominations that accept his theology. Except for the last part, about the "Peaceable Kingdom" passages in Isaiah, this answer is extracted and edited from my article, "Will We See our Pets Again in Heaven?" ...


2

Man was created omnivorous: According to John Gill, meat was eaten even before the flood. Hence, man was created to eat herbs, fruits and flesh. . John Gill's comment on Genesis 7:2 "Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens",.... From hence it appears, that the distinction of clean and unclean beasts, at least for sacrifice, if not ...


2

As a 'Young Earth' creationist, the question of Lions having teeth doesn't really make a lot of sense. We don't believe there were any Lions or Tigers as we know them today, only big cats. Those big cats contained the genetic information for sharp teeth, not so sharp teeth, and all the way in between (just like your parents have the genetic information for ...


2

Yair Zakovitch, as cited by Bruce Feiler in Abraham, page 89, has considered the significance of the donkey. He explains: Look, the Gospels are a very good piece of Jewish literature, and they understand that one cannot have a messianic leader who is not Davidic. If you want to convince the Jews that Jesus is the one, he has to be linked with David. He ...


2

The primary passage that this incident corresponds to is Zechariah 9:9-10 (ESV) 9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey,on a colt, the foal of a donkey. 10 I will cut off the chariot from Ephraim and ...



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